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University of Missouri Health Care shows why IT is an innovation hub, not a cost center

The University of Missouri Health Care has a unique way of handling technology. Its private-public partnership with Cerner created the Tiger Institute for Health Innovation in 2009, designed to address health concerns in the area and connect providers with each other to improve care quality and costs.

MU Health CIO Bryan Bliven said that mission is at the core of the organization: “It’s an intentional culture, the culture of yes.”

“Together we deliver care and serve the community,” Bliven said. “Everyone in the organization wants to deliver on that, first and foremost.”

The focus on innovation gives the IT department more freedom to be creative in its work, as IT isn’t seen as just a “cost center to be controlled and managed, it’s more of an innovation center,” he said. ” What can we do through technology to improve the lives and health of Missourians?”

That attitude and the hospital’s partnership with Cerner has yielded a long list of accolades, notably the CHIME Transformational Leadership Award in 2016.

Bliven highlighted the work MU Health does to ensure all employees are in tune with the hospital’s mission to serve the rural part of the state through education, research and exceptional care.

Indeed, it’s that culture within the organization that enables employees to leverage the latest technology to make a big difference in the community.

“It’s not just install and maintain technology. We use technology to have better quality care,” Bliven said. “That’s what people get excited about.”

Technology is tied into the entire organization. For example, the team considers its data footprint and how that can maximize value inside and outside the IT shop.

“We’ve been working on tying our IT goals into the organization’s goals moving forward,” Bliven said. “We weave our strategy into the entire organization. We’ll create a three-year plan to march out against and tie into the service lines the organization deems strategic.”

Right now, consumer engagement is top of mind, as well as revenue cycle, Bliven added, noting that a new Cerner revenue cycle platform will go live in 2019. 

The health system has also been working on improving readmissions. Bliven said that it identified the ideal goal for the project and leveraged process analytics to find gaps. Bliven’s team created a plan based on that data and reduced readmissions by 40 percent.

MU is also using analytics to improve physician documentation and reduce time spent in workflows, while using data to inform staffing needs. And the hospital offers its tech as a service to local physician practices or regional hospitals that may not be able to manage IT on their own.

But through all projects, communication is key, he said. For example, MU Health is going through a move as it’s running out of space. So it made sure its staff understood why the move was taking place.

“You have to have those tough conversations,” Bliven said. “Once they know the way you want things done, let them own it. Empower your leaders to take ownership, to be part of the mission so they’re engaged.”

Best hospital IT departments: 2017

Meet the winners and find out their winning formula.

Click here to learn more about how we chose this year’s winners.

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com

University of Illinois Health shows how C-suite, IT team alignment actually makes change happen

Many hospitals are beginning to realize that one key to successful IT deployments and security posture is to partner with leadership to get all departments on the same page.

For the University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System, this became very clear as it began to plan for its transition to an Epic electronic health record platform. UI Health considered the EHR replacement both tactical and strategic, according to CIO Audrius Polikaitis. 

“We’re positioning it as a redesign of workflows, with IT being an enabler. IT is important in rolling it out and supporting it,” Polikaitis added. “We might have some challenges with change management but if leadership owns it, it might go smoother.”

The Epic project is predicted to go live in 18 to 24 months. UI Health is replacing all clinical and revenue cycle platforms. Currently, it uses Cerner for its inpatient and ambulatory systems, while billing is on Epic. Polikaitis calls the project a “wholesale replacement.”

UI Health prides itself on being what Polikaitis called a “slack organization,” with directors and C-suite leaders mingling together with staff. Leaders have a presence within an organization and are approachable to its employees, he said – in fact, the executive level offices are right on the first floor.

The health system also recently completely redesigned its management processes, starting with its workflow. Further, UI Health has made serious investments in its leadership team. Every manager must go through a nine-month leadership program.

“Fundamentally, it’s the notion: How do people get into leadership positions? Technically, it’s because they’re the best at their job,” Polikaitis said. “But we’re realizing: We don’t prepare people for the leadership role … It’s the notion of investment into people and leaders, so we saw as an organization how we can improve.”

The result? Managers understand their roles as leaders, rather than doers, he said. And it changes how employees view leadership within the organization and will engage more with those managers.

To Polikaitis, this also means partnerships in planning for future IT projects. Once the Epic project gets underway, UI Health will work on transitioning its imaging systems from slides to digital. It also plans to further leverage analytics, bringing data more closely into clinical workflows.

UI Health has been building dashboards and Big Data platforms for the past eight months, along with working with stakeholders to develop the right representation of data, he explained. Now, providers carry around iPads with these dashboards using analytics for real-time action.

“It’s the notion of very real-time, very numeric data,” Polikaitis said. “It was a massive, massive initiative.”

Best hospital IT departments: 2017

Meet the winners and find out their winning formula.

Click here to learn more about how we chose this year’s winners.

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com

University of Washington celebrates fundraising and construction …

December 13, 2017

UW News

University of Washington celebrates fundraising and construction milestones for second computer science building

December 13, 2017

UW News

Duke University Hospital president leaving for Johns Hopkins Health System

Kevin Sowers, who started his health care career at Duke University Medical Center as an oncology nurse 32 years ago and rose to president of Duke University Hospital, has been named president of the $8 billion Johns Hopkins Health System in Baltimore.

Sowers, 56, was selected by Johns Hopkins trustees on Friday and will assume his new position on Feb. 1 as president of the Johns Hopkins Health System and as executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Sowers will replace Ronald Peterson, who headed Johns Hopkins for 44 years, as president of a health care system that comprises six hospitals in Maryland, Washington and Florida, and includes a staff of more than 40,000.

“It’s an honor to be selected as the CEO of a world-class hospital with such highly skilled and dedicated faculty and staff,” Sowers said in a DukeHealth release. “I’m committed to furthering the hospital’s mission of providing excellence in patient care through the clinical translation of innovative research, while maintaining a health operational and financial foundation.”

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Paul Rothman, CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine and dean of the medical faculty, called Sowers a “visionary leader” with a deep understanding of academic medical centers. Sowers will work with Rothman in overseeing the hospital system that includes more than 40 outpatient primary health care sites, managed care plans, and global management and consulting services.

Fresh out of college in 1985 with a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the Capital University School of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio, Sowers joined Duke as an staff oncology nurse and received his first of many promotions, to assistant head nurse, the following year. In 1989, Sowers got a Master of Science in Nursing from Duke. In recent years he has been an adjunct professor at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business.

Before he became president of of the 957-bed flagship Duke University Hospital, Sowers had been the hospital’s chief operating officer and interim CEO for Durham Regional Hospital. His 43-page resume includes extensive publications, national and international consulting roles, research, honors, presentations and professional affiliations.

Sowers will be joined in Baltimore by his partner, Anthony Evans.

Duke University Hospital president leaving for Johns Hopkins Health System

Kevin Sowers, who started his health care career at Duke University Medical Center as an oncology nurse 32 years ago and rose to president of Duke University Hospital, has been named president of the $8 billion Johns Hopkins Health System in Baltimore.

Sowers, 56, was selected by Johns Hopkins trustees on Friday and will assume his new position on Feb. 1 as president of the Johns Hopkins Health System and as executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Sowers will replace Ronald Peterson, who headed Johns Hopkins for 44 years, as president of a health care system that comprises six hospitals in Maryland, Washington and Florida, and includes a staff of more than 40,000.

“It’s an honor to be selected as the CEO of a world-class hospital with such highly skilled and dedicated faculty and staff,” Sowers said in a DukeHealth release. “I’m committed to furthering the hospital’s mission of providing excellence in patient care through the clinical translation of innovative research, while maintaining a health operational and financial foundation.”

Never miss a local story.

Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access.

Paul Rothman, CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine and dean of the medical faculty, called Sowers a “visionary leader” with a deep understanding of academic medical centers. Sowers will work with Rothman in overseeing the hospital system that includes more than 40 outpatient primary health care sites, managed care plans, and global management and consulting services.

Fresh out of college in 1985 with a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the Capital University School of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio, Sowers joined Duke as an staff oncology nurse and received his first of many promotions, to assistant head nurse, the following year. In 1989, Sowers got a Master of Science in Nursing from Duke. In recent years he has been an adjunct professor at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business.

Before he became president of of the 957-bed flagship Duke University Hospital, Sowers had been the hospital’s chief operating officer and interim CEO for Durham Regional Hospital. His 43-page resume includes extensive publications, national and international consulting roles, research, honors, presentations and professional affiliations.

Sowers will be joined in Baltimore by his partner, Anthony Evans.

Duke University Hospital president leaving for Johns Hopkins Health System

Kevin Sowers, who started his health care career at Duke University Medical Center as an oncology nurse 32 years ago and rose to president of Duke University Hospital, has been named president of the $8 billion Johns Hopkins Health System in Baltimore.

Sowers, 56, was selected by Johns Hopkins trustees on Friday and will assume his new position on Feb. 1 as president of the Johns Hopkins Health System and as executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Sowers will replace Ronald Peterson, who headed Johns Hopkins for 44 years, as president of a health care system that comprises six hospitals in Maryland, Washington and Florida, and includes a staff of more than 40,000.

“It’s an honor to be selected as the CEO of a world-class hospital with such highly skilled and dedicated faculty and staff,” Sowers said in a DukeHealth release. “I’m committed to furthering the hospital’s mission of providing excellence in patient care through the clinical translation of innovative research, while maintaining a health operational and financial foundation.”

Never miss a local story.

Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access.

Paul Rothman, CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine and dean of the medical faculty, called Sowers a “visionary leader” with a deep understanding of academic medical centers. Sowers will work with Rothman in overseeing the hospital system that includes more than 40 outpatient primary health care sites, managed care plans, and global management and consulting services.

Fresh out of college in 1985 with a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the Capital University School of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio, Sowers joined Duke as an staff oncology nurse and received his first of many promotions, to assistant head nurse, the following year. In 1989, Sowers got a Master of Science in Nursing from Duke. In recent years he has been an adjunct professor at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business.

Before he became president of of the 957-bed flagship Duke University Hospital, Sowers had been the hospital’s chief operating officer and interim CEO for Durham Regional Hospital. His 43-page resume includes extensive publications, national and international consulting roles, research, honors, presentations and professional affiliations.

Sowers will be joined in Baltimore by his partner, Anthony Evans.

Ball State University responds to Governor’s call for computer literacy in Indiana classrooms with proposed new …

Topic: College of Applied Sciences and Technology

December 8, 2017

To create a larger pool of workers who are prepared to meet the needs of a 21st century economy, Indiana Governor Eric J. Holcomb wants all Indiana students to have access to computer science instruction. Ball State University is answering his challenge by working to create a new undergraduate degree in Computer Science Education. A team of Ball State faculty and staff are working closely to develop a degree that aligns with the Governor’s vision to link education to workforce training. Ball State’s proposed Computer Science Education Degree will provide the requirements of a major in computer science with the core requirements of an undergraduate degree in education.

“To be prepared for the demands of our rapidly changing economy, Indiana students need quality STEM instruction throughout their K-12 educational journey,” Gov. Holcomb said. “Putting computer and information science in every Indiana school is a big part of that. A new degree in Computer Science Education from Ball State University has great potential to help us get more teachers with computer science training into our classrooms.”

The proposed degree will build on Ball State’s existing computer science curricula. Students majoring in secondary education will be encouraged to pursue a minor in Foundation of Computer Systems. This minor provides 22 to 24 credit hours in computer science, analytics, software and hardware, and it can also be packaged as a concentration in the Elementary Education degree.

“I’m proud of our team at Ball State University who saw a major gap in Indiana’s educational system and came up with a long term solution,” said President Geoffrey Mearns. “This new degree will continue Ball State’s commitment to increasing the number of Indiana students who graduate with basic computer science skills, making them better equipped to enter the workforce when they graduate high school. Although we have training activities planned for current educators this summer, we realized this issue cannot be fixed by simply having events. We knew we needed do something more strategically which led to this new degree. Eventually, this degree will have positive ramifications both here in Indiana and across the nation.”

Ball State also plans to offer computer science modules online to assist individual teachers throughout the school year and develop course-based outreach programs for elementary, middle and high school students.

The new program still must gain approval from the Ball State Board of Trustees, the Indiana Commission for Higher Education, and the college accreditor.

University study shows iPhones can miss 21% of your steps – but half of it is your fault

If you use the Activity or Health app on your iPhone to keep track of the number of steps you walk each day, you’re probably doing better than you think. A study by the University of British Columbia found that the iPhone underestimates the number of steps people take by up to 21.5% …


3b66d_screen-shot-2017-03-30-at-14-48-26 University study shows iPhones can miss 21% of your steps – but half of it is your fault

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The study tested iPhones against the gold standard for measuring steps: a waist-mounted pedometer. The team also performed laboratory tests where the number of steps walked on a treadmill were counted manually, to provide an absolute measure.

What they found was interesting. For faster walking speeds, in a lab environment, the iPhone was off by less than 5% – an accuracy considered acceptable even in a dedicated pedometer.

For slower walking paces, however, the iPhone underestimated the number of steps by as much as 9.4%. And in real-life use, the iPhone missed 21.5% of steps – an average of 1,340 per day. The UBC says this is explained both by slow walking and by the fact that people don’t take their phones with them everywhere when they are at home or work. Trips to the bathroom and water cooler are two examples where study participants left their phones behind.

The good news, though, is that the study found that inaccuracies consistently resulted from under-reads, not over-reads.

“For people who are already tracking their steps, they can rest assured that if their phone says they’re getting the recommended 10,000 steps in a day, they are probably getting at least that many, and they are working toward better health,” said lead author Mark Duncan. “From a public health point of view, it’s better that it underestimates than overestimates.”

The study was published in the Journal of Sports Sciences.


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Opioid Reduction After Surgery At University Of Michigan : Shots …

02712_pills-32-0aa37f2904b91e3cab2a45707fd261de224336af-s1100-c15 Opioid Reduction After Surgery At University Of Michigan : Shots ...

Surgeons at the University of Michigan are prescribing fewer opioids to reduce the risk of addiction.

John Moore/Getty Images


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Surgeons at the University of Michigan are prescribing fewer opioids to reduce the risk of addiction.

John Moore/Getty Images

It may not be rocket science, but a group of surgeons at the University of Michigan has devised an approach to help curb the nation’s opioid epidemic — starting at their own hospital.

Opioid addiction has been deemed a “public health emergency” by the White House. It’s estimated to have claimed 64,000 lives in 2016 alone. And research shows that post-surgical patients are at an increased risk of addiction because of the medicine they receive to help manage pain during recovery.

To lower the risk, there’s a simple remedy: Surgeons should give patients fewer pills after surgery — the time when many people are first introduced to what can be highly addictive painkillers. They should also talk to patients about the proper use of opioids and the associated risks.

That seemingly small intervention could lead to significant changes in how opioids are prescribed and make inroads against the current epidemic, said the researchers. Their findings were published Wednesday in the journal JAMA Surgery.

“The way we’ve been prescribing opioids until this point is we’ve basically been taking a guess at how much patients would need,” said Jay Lee, a research fellow and general surgery resident at the University of Michigan, and one of the paper’s authors. “We’re trying to prevent addiction and misuse by making sure patients themselves who are receiving opioids know how to use them more safely — that they are getting a more consistent amount and one that will reduce the risk of them getting addicted.”

The researchers identified 170 patients who underwent gallbladder surgery and surveyed them within a year of the operation about how many pills they actually used, what pain they experienced after surgery and whether they had used other painkillers, such as ibuprofen.

They used the findings to create new hospital guidelines that cut back on the standard opioid prescription for gallbladder surgeries.

Then, they analyzed how patients fared under the new approach, tracking 200 surgery patients who received substantially fewer pills — an average of 75 milligrams of opioid painkillers, specifically oxycodone or hydrocodone/acetaminophen. Previously, the average dose was 250 milligrams.

Despite getting less medication, patients didn’t report higher levels of pain, and they were no more likely than the previously studied patients to ask for prescription refills. They were also likely to actually use fewer pills.

The takeaway: After surgery, patients are getting prescribed more opioids than necessary and doctors can reduce the amount without patients experiencing negative side effects.

Within five months of the new guidelines taking effect at Michigan’s University Hospital, surgeons reduced the volume of prescribed opioids by about 7,000 pills. It’s now been a year since the change took effect, and the researchers estimate they have curbed prescriptions by about 15,000 pills, said Ryan Howard, a general surgery resident and the paper’s lead author.

The reduction has real implications.

“This really shows in a very methodological way that we are dramatically over-prescribing,” said Michael Botticelli, who spearheaded drug control policy under the Obama White House, including the administration’s response to the opioid crisis.

“Not only do we have to reduce the supply to prevent future addiction, but we really have to minimize opportunities for diversion and misuse,” he said.

More hospitals are starting to turn in this direction, Botticelli said. He now runs the Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center, which is also trying to systematically reduce opioid prescriptions after surgeries.

Meanwhile, 24 states have passed laws to limit how many pills a doctor prescribes at once, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

The researchers also created “common sense” talking points for doctors and nurses to use with patients. They include:

  1. Encouraging patients to use lower-strength, non-addictive painkillers first;
  2. Warning them about the risks of addiction; and
  3. Reminding them that even a sufficient opioid prescription would leave them feeling some pain.

The talking points also offer tips for patients on safely storing and disposing of extra pills.

“So much of this problem can be addressed with solutions that are not complicated,” said Julie Gaither, an instructor at Yale School of Medicine. Gaither has researched the opioid epidemic’s consequences, though she was not involved with this study.

Kaiser Health News is a nonprofit news service covering health issues. It is an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation that is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

UW-Madison computer sciences grad helped craft a galaxy far, far away – University of Wisconsin

4df95_star-wars-the-last-jedi-resistance-bomber_51fd90aa-1024x429 UW-Madison computer sciences grad helped craft a galaxy far, far away - University of Wisconsin

A scene from Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi, which comes out December 15. Rose helped design a new virtual camera system that moves like a film camera but allows the director to see the results of his movements within a digital scene. Image courtesy of Star Wars

As a child, Rachel Rose wore clothes emblazoned with C-3PO and drifted off to sleep on Star Wars sheets. And while the adventures of Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia and the Jedi knights may have filled her dreams, she never imagined she’d grow up to help bring stories like theirs to life.

Yet Rose does exactly that as an engineer at Industrial Light Magic, the motion picture visual effects company founded by Star Wars creator George Lucas. And the UW–Madison computer sciences department played a key role in her path from young fan to one with the Force.

Growing up in Orlando, Rose nurtured a love of Star Wars and also discovered a budding fascination with computers.

4df95_star-wars-the-last-jedi-resistance-bomber_51fd90aa-1024x429 UW-Madison computer sciences grad helped craft a galaxy far, far away - University of Wisconsin

UW-Madison alumna Rachel Rose works at Industrial Light Magic in San Francisco, where she’s helped bring the latest Star Wars movies to life. Submitted image

“It started really, really early, even though we didn’t have a computer until I was a junior in high school,” she says. “Just the whole idea of computers being able to execute on ideas fascinated me.”

Rose didn’t learn to code until she was an undergrad at Grinnell College, but by the time graduation neared, she was seeking out a strong computer sciences graduate program. Drawn to the reputation of UW–Madison’s CS department, Rose earned a master’s degree in 2003 and a Ph.D. in 2007 there, focusing on computer animation.

“The CS program is full of fantastic professors who were really motivating,” she says. “They helped me make connections so by the time I was out of grad school, I already knew a lot of people.”

One of those connections, fellow computer sciences grad Lucas Kovar, worked at Industrial Light Magic in San Francisco and put in a good word for Rose. She was hired right out of school as an engineer in research and development, the group that builds technology — or improves its quality or efficiency — so artists can bring images to the screen.

4df95_star-wars-the-last-jedi-resistance-bomber_51fd90aa-1024x429 UW-Madison computer sciences grad helped craft a galaxy far, far away - University of Wisconsin

A scene is filmed for Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi. Image courtesy of Star Wars

She especially enjoyed working on computer animation, devising ways to animate a character. It’s a role she likens to the person who builds a puppet, who must think through what the puppeteer will need to make the character move in certain ways.

These days, Rose leads the group that handles research and development in the burgeoning area of virtual production.

“Virtual production at ILM is the set of tools and workflows that we use to do digital production in similar ways to what one would do in live action production,” she says.

For instance, she’s credited on Rogue One, the first standalone Star Wars film released last year, for helping to design and develop a new virtual camera system that moves like a film camera but allows the director to see the results of his movements within a digital scene.

“[Director] Gareth Edwards used the virtual camera to record digital camera moves during the space battle in a handheld way that better matched the feel of the rest of the film — but at a huge scale, since the space battle is humongous,” she says.

“Being able to collaborate and work with others is the most important thing no matter where in the company you are. The ability to both listen and change your own thoughts on a project is crucial.

Rachel Rose

Rose and her team have also contributed to the franchise’s upcoming releases — Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi, which picks up the action from The Force Awakens starting December 15, and Solo: A Star Wars Story, offering the backstory of Han Solo and opening in May 2018.

“In RD, we tend to work on every film,” she says, adding that she’s not at liberty to divulge details about the forthcoming movies.

But Rose is proud to talk about working at a company long known for employing women in leadership roles, and also honest about the work that still needs to be done to make her industry more equitable.

“I feel really lucky to be able to work with a bunch of women at the top,” she says. “But there are still times when I’m the only woman in a meeting.”

It’s important to her that others — colleagues both younger and older, as well as children like her seven-year-old daughter and four-year-old son — notice someone like her doing cutting-edge work and leading a team in tech.

“I try to do a lot of outreach, a lot of presentations, a lot of standing in front of people to let them see I’m out there,” she says.

Most days, though, Rose focuses on the work at hand, the latest creative problem to be tackled and the people with which to solve it.

“One of the most awesome and one of the most challenging parts of my job is this place is full of extraordinarily talented people — the best artists you can find, the best technologists you can find,” she says. “We don’t always agree on everything, but ideally we come up with something that’s better than we’d do on our own.”

The key to success at work, she says, is quite simple. “Being able to collaborate and work with others is the most important thing no matter where in the company you are,” she says. “The ability to both listen and change your own thoughts on a project is crucial.”

It can also help to have common ground to refer back to — and Rose and her coworkers share a passion for Star Wars and the sense of wonder and adventure it instilled in them as children.

“It was special,” she says of growing up with the films. “So many of us are here at ILM in part because of that love.”

4df95_star-wars-the-last-jedi-resistance-bomber_51fd90aa-1024x429 UW-Madison computer sciences grad helped craft a galaxy far, far away - University of Wisconsin

The space battles in the Star Wars film series are done with the help of Industrial Light Magic, where Rachel Rose works. Image courtesy of Star Wars

University of Maryland start-up bought by global health tech company

A start-up company launched with technology licensed from the University of Maryland School of Medicine was bought by Royal Philips, the global health technology firm announced.

Baltimore-based Analytical Informatics Inc. and its technology will be rolled into the Philips unit Philips Radiology Solutions, expanding its offerings more quickly.

“Integrating Analytical Informatics’ software tools and applications into our current offerings will enable us to accelerate the delivery of next-generation technology, software and services, to bring the power of operational intelligence and decision support to radiology,” said Sham Sokka, general manager of radiology solutions at Philips.

Netherlands-based Philips did not disclose the financial details of the deal. Philips is a global giant with more than $20 billion in annual sales that employs 73,000 people.

University of Maryland start-up bought by global health tech company

A start-up company launched with technology licensed from the University of Maryland School of Medicine was bought by Royal Philips, the global health technology firm announced.

Baltimore-based Analytical Informatics Inc. and its technology will be rolled into the Philips unit Philips Radiology Solutions, expanding its offerings more quickly.

“Integrating Analytical Informatics’ software tools and applications into our current offerings will enable us to accelerate the delivery of next-generation technology, software and services, to bring the power of operational intelligence and decision support to radiology,” said Sham Sokka, general manager of radiology solutions at Philips.

Netherlands-based Philips did not disclose the financial details of the deal. Philips is a global giant with more than $20 billion in annual sales that employs 73,000 people.

University of Maryland start-up bought by global health tech company

A start-up company launched with technology licensed from the University of Maryland School of Medicine was bought by Royal Philips, the global health technology firm announced.

Baltimore-based Analytical Informatics Inc. and its technology will be rolled into the Philips unit Philips Radiology Solutions, expanding its offerings more quickly.

“Integrating Analytical Informatics’ software tools and applications into our current offerings will enable us to accelerate the delivery of next-generation technology, software and services, to bring the power of operational intelligence and decision support to radiology,” said Sham Sokka, general manager of radiology solutions at Philips.

Netherlands-based Philips did not disclose the financial details of the deal. Philips is a global giant with more than $20 billion in annual sales that employs 73,000 people.

UVA Health Professional Says University Not to Blame for High Insurance Costs

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (WVIR) –

An administrator in the University of Virginia Health System says healthcare costs in Charlottesville are not going up for one of the reasons cited by the Washington Post.

The post reported that the Charlottesville area has the highest insurance premiums through the Affordable Care Act.

Richard Shannon, executive vice president for health affairs, says in an editorial he wrote for the Post, the rates for services at UVA are inaccurately cited as a reason for the increase.

He claims it has more to do with the fact that Optima is the only insurer left in the market for people who get coverage through the government.

He says that since Optima is the only insurer, that allows it to increase premiums and the University of Virginia is not to blame.

UVA Health Professional Says University Not to Blame for High Insurance Costs

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (WVIR) –

An administrator in the University of Virginia Health System says healthcare costs in Charlottesville are not going up for one of the reasons cited by the Washington Post.

The post reported that the Charlottesville area has the highest insurance premiums through the Affordable Care Act.

Richard Shannon, executive vice president for health affairs, says in an editorial he wrote for the Post, the rates for services at UVA are inaccurately cited as a reason for the increase.

He claims it has more to do with the fact that Optima is the only insurer left in the market for people who get coverage through the government.

He says that since Optima is the only insurer, that allows it to increase premiums and the University of Virginia is not to blame.

Police: Man Steals Apple Computer, Laptop From Columbia University Building

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Police have released surveillance images of a man wanted in connection with two burglaries at Columbia University.

Both incidents occurred at the School of International and Public Affairs on West 118th Street in Manhattan.

Police say the suspect made off with more than $10,000 in Apple computers and accessories back on Sept. 29.

He struck again last month, stealing an Apple MacBook and charger worth nearly $3,000.

Anyone with information in regards to this incident is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 800-577-TIPS or for Spanish 1-888-57-PISTA (74782)

The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or texting their tips to 274637(CRIMES) then enter TIP577.

University degrees combine computer science and ag, music

URBANA, Ill. (AP) — The University of Illinois plans to offer new degrees that combine computer science with music or crop sciences.

University officials say the new bachelor of science in computer and crop sciences will be the first degree of its kind in the U.S.

They say it’s a natural fit for the University of Illinois because the state is routinely one of the top producers of corn and soybeans in the country. It’s also home to major agricultural companies such as Deere Co. and Archer Daniels Midland Co.

German Bollero is the head of the Department of Crop Sciences. Bollero says there’s an increasing need in agriculture for people who have expertise in data analytics.

The computer science and music degree will prepare students for careers in music technology or composition.

 

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

University degrees combine computer science and ag, music


URBANA, Ill. (AP) — The University of Illinois plans to offer new degrees that combine computer science with music or crop sciences.

University officials say the new bachelor of science in computer and crop sciences will be the first degree of its kind in the U.S.

They say it’s a natural fit for the University of Illinois because the state is routinely one of the top producers of corn and soybeans in the country. It’s also home to major agricultural companies such as Deere Co. and Archer Daniels Midland Co.

German Bollero is the head of the Department of Crop Sciences. Bollero says there’s an increasing need in agriculture for people who have expertise in data analytics.

The computer science and music degree will prepare students for careers in music technology or composition.

University Health System partners with Alamodome

University Health System is partnering with the Alamodome but not just for naming rights, to reach out to people that need care and advise the venue on healthy food options.




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