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Trump reportedly drinks 12 cans of Diet Coke each day. Is that healthy?

Celebrating 1237! #Trump2016

A post shared by President Donald J. Trump (@realdonaldtrump) on May 26, 2016 at 2:29pm PDT

Those keeping tabs on President Trump’s diet know that Wendy’s and McDonald’s are staples. While campaigning, Trump inhaled Filets-o-Fish and Big Macs and snacked on Oreos.

He’d then wash it all down with a Diet Coke.

Just how much diet soda the president consumes, though, was revealed Saturday by the New York Times, which reported that Trump has a button to summon household staff for one of the 12 Diet Cokes he drinks each day.

It’s a lot of soda to consume in one day, and — were it regular soda — most research suggests the potential consequences would be alarming. A 12-ounce can of regular Coke has 140 calories and 39 grams of sugar. By instead drinking Diet Coke, which has no calories or sugar, Trump has avoided consuming 1,680 calories and 468 grams of sugar daily.

But the effects of drinking diet soda have been long debated by experts, with some studies raising concerns about long-term health consequences. Experimental research on artificial sweeteners, like the ones found in diet soda, is inconclusive. The Canadian Medical Association Journal found in July that there are very few randomly controlled studies on artificial sweeteners — just seven trials involving only about 1,000 people — that looked at what happened when people consumed artificial sweeteners for more than six months.

Nearly half of adults and a quarter of children consume artificial sweeteners each day, according to the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Diet soda might be a good short-term substitute for people trying to stay away from the high-sugar content of regular soda, when consumed in small amounts. Some dietitians and nutrition scientists believe sucralose and stevia, which can both be found in diet sodas, are a healthier alternative for people to enjoy sweet drinks without the calories.

But others say artificial sweeteners can confuse the brain and the body, desensitizing consumers to sugar and leading them to consume more sweets without being aware of their calorie intake.

There is one thing, however, most studies agree on: Even if diet soda is healthier, you probably shouldn’t be drinking 12 cans a day.

Here’s what the risks might be if — like Trump — you do.

Stroke or dementia

People who drank diet soda daily were three times more likely to develop stroke and dementia than those who consumed it weekly or less, according to a study published in April in the journal Stroke.

The study followed 2,888 people aged 45 and over for risk of stroke and 1,484 people 60 and over for dementia over 10 years. They were participants of the Framingham Heart Study, in which several thousand men and women have taken regular health tests since the 1970s.

The study found those who consumed at least one artificially sweetened drink a day, compared to less than one a week, were three times as likely to have an ischemic stroke from blood vessel blockage. They were also three times as likely to be diagnosed with dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease. The effect of diet sodas persisted even if the researchers controlled for factors such as diabetes or high blood pressure.

But Matthew Pase, a Boston University School of Medicine neurologist and the study’s lead author, emphasized that the research showed only a correlation — and not causation. While the risk of stroke and dementia was greater, the numbers were low.

“Three percent of the people had a new stroke and five percent developed dementia, so we’re still talking about a small number of people developing either stroke or dementia,” he said in a video explaining the study.

In responding to the study, the American Beverage Association said in a statement that low-calorie sweeteners have been proven safe by worldwide government safety authorities as well as “hundreds of scientific studies.”

“There is nothing in this research that counters this well-established fact,” officials said.

An unsafe amount of caffeine consumption

About 400 milligrams of caffeine a day is what’s considered safe for most healthy adults, according to the Mayo Clinic.

That amount is equal to four cups of brewed coffee and 10 cans of soda — two cans less than the amount Trump drinks.

That much caffeine can lead to migraines, insomnia, restlessness and muscle tremors.

Weight gain

Obesity rates have leveled off in the last decade in terms of BMI, while the consumption of noncaloric sweeteners increased.

Those patterns could mean that artificial sweeteners have helped curb obesity, but studies in recent years suggest those sweeteners are causing the exact thing the people consuming them are hoping to avoid: weight gain.

The Canadian Medical Association Journal study in July found there wasn’t much evidence proving sweeteners prevented weight loss. Researchers looked at 30 studies tracking people’s diets over time and found that those who consumed sweeteners were more likely to have increases in their waist and waistlines — and had a higher risk of obesity, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, Type 2 diabetes and strokes.

“I think originally it was calories were the problem, and we’ve made something that was zero calories, so we’re good,” Meghan Azad, a researcher at the University of Manitoba, told The Washington Post in July. “But we’re learning that it’s not just about the calories.”

In 2015, researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio examined data for nearly 10 years from 749 Mexican Americans and European Americans ages 65 and older and found that daily and occasional diet soda drinkers gained almost three times as much belly fat as non-drinkers.

Occasional diet soda drinkers added an average of 1.83 inches to their waist circumferences, while the non-drinkers added .8 inches over the nearly 10-year period. Those who consumed diet soda daily gained 3.16 inches.

But some reports show that the benefits or harm of artificial sweeteners depend on what they’re paired with.

For example, 2012 study by The New England Journal of Medicine found that Dutch children who consumed one artificially sweetened beverage each day for 18 months gained less weight than those who drank one sugary beverage a day.

Then, in August, Dana Small, a neuroscientist at Yale University, told Vox that her research suggests artificial sweeteners could cause weight gain if consumed with carbohydrates, because the blend of foods disrupts the body’s metabolic response. A diet drink consumed on an empty stomach could be less harmful than one consumed with, say, a Big Mac.

It’s a concerning discovery, she said, because food companies are designing “healthier” products that contain blends of sweeteners and carbohydrates. For example, Chobani’s Simply 100 yogurt contains 14 grams of carbohydrate (six of them from sugar) and stevia leaf extract, Vox reported.

People who drink three or more artificially sweetened beverages a day, Small told Vox, could be more likely to drink them during meals with carbs that disrupt the body’s metabolic response.

In various Q As during his campaign, Trump expressed his love for pasta, second helpings of potatoes au gratin and steak.

If he’s drinking 12 cans of Diet Coke a day, it’s likely he’s drinking some of them with carbs.

Read more: 

New CDC head faces questions about financial conflicts of interest

A mother got the flu from her children — and was dead two days later

Get set: Your internet bill is about to soar, thanks to Trump’s FCC

Thursday’s the day that the Trump administration will overturn former President Obama’s rules protecting consumers from greedy telecom companies manipulating internet access and pricing.

I got a preview of what’s to come over the weekend as my Spectrum internet bill soared by 20% — and as I encountered the take-it-or-leave-it policy imposed by Spectrum’s owner, Charter Communications, which purchased Time Warner Cable last year.

The Republican-controlled Federal Communications Commission is expected to vote along party lines this week to end net neutrality. That’s the policy ensuring broadband providers such as phone and cable companies can’t give preferential treatment to anyone — their own streaming-video service, say, over Netflix.

The Obama administration passed regulations in 2015 prohibiting internet service companies from interfering with the content flowing over their networks or charging extra for more reliable access.

Deadline week crunch for health law sign-ups under Trump

The Trump administration came into office looking to dismantle Barack Obama’s health care law, but the Affordable Care Act survived. Now the administration is on the hook to deliver a smooth ending to sign-up season, with a crush of customers expected this week.

For millions of eligible consumers time runs out on Friday.

Dec. 15 is the last day for procrastinators to enroll in subsidized private coverage in 39 states served by the federal HealthCare.gov website. Consumer interest has remained brisk, even as the Trump administration cut the sign-up season in half, reducing it from roughly from 90 days to 45 days.

“It’s more likely than ever that they’re going to run into real volume problems in the last week because that’s when everybody is going to show up,” said Tim Jost, a legal analyst who closely follows the workings of the ACA.

Heavy traffic could slow the website, and lead to long hold times at the federal call center. For the vast majority, this is the last opportunity to secure coverage for 2018, or switch from an existing plan. One exception: People living in hurricane-affected areas can get an extension to sign up by Dec. 31 by contacting the HealthCare.gov call center. That could make a difference in states such as Texas and Florida.

Enrollment fluctuates in the course of the year, but it’s estimated that 9 million to 10 million people currently have coverage through the ACA’s marketplaces. The markets cater to people who don’t have access to a job-based plan, and participation is expected to dip somewhat next year.

In a twist, many people eligible for financial help may actually be able to pay lower premiums in 2018. Although list price premiums for the most popular plans went up sharply, so did taxpayer-provided subsidies that limit how much individuals actually have to pay. In many communities, bare-bones “bronze” plans are available for no monthly premium to those eligible for subsidies.

Sign-up season has been free of problems up to now, insurers say. Scheduled early Sunday maintenance shutdowns have not been a disruption.

Nonetheless, administration officials at the Health and Human Services department are saying little about their contingency plans for the final week. That’s a contrast from the Obama years.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which also administers the ACA, did say that the deadline hour will remain the same this year — midnight Pacific time. That means consumers on the East Coast will have until 3 a.m. on Saturday morning to enroll.

Although the Trump administration slashed the advertising budget, HealthCare.gov has been sending out targeted emails to people potentially eligible. Examples:

— “Don’t forget: Friday, December 15 is the last day to pick a 2018 Marketplace plan.”

— “FINAL DEADLINE: Enroll in a 2018 health plan before December 15 or risk going without Marketplace coverage.”

— “Come back to HealthCare.gov to select a plan before the final deadline or risk missing out on 2018 Marketplace coverage.”

During the Obama years, officials allowed a grace period for consumers who started an application before the final deadline, but were unable to finish. It’s unclear if the Trump administration will allow such extensions, or whether it will strictly enforce the deadline hour. Previous extensions allowed hundreds of thousands of consumers to enroll.

Failure to provide extensions this year would be a mistake, said Andy Slavitt, who oversaw HealthCare.gov under Obama.

“It really would not be fair to people, particularly if there are technology challenges with the last minute surge as there have been every year,” Slavitt said.

While Dec. 15 is the deadline for states served by HealthCare.gov, that’s not the case in all parts of the country. Most states that run their own health insurance websites are providing an extended period for consumers to enroll. In California and New York, for instance, the deadline remains the same as last year — Jan. 31. Other states have deadlines spanning from late December to mid-January.

Economist Joe Antos of the business-oriented American Enterprise Institute said the Trump administration has to get it right. Otherwise, it reinforces the Democrats’ charge that Trump is bent on sabotaging the health law.

“Everything that goes wrong will be attributed to White House malevolence,” said Antos. “Donald Trump should not be tweeting negative statements this week. If he were to tweet at all, I would suggest: ‘Be sure to check your plan.'”

White House faces questions about Trump’s health after slurred words

We’ve talked a couple of times this week about the dangerous consequences surrounding Donald Trump’s new policy toward Israel, which the president announced at a White House event on Wednesday. But as Rachel noted on last night’s show, there are some lingering questions not only about what he said, but also about how he said it.

There was clearly something off about the way in which Trump spoke at the event, and while I’m not going to speculate about what have been the cause for the president’s slurred speech, his apparent difficulties did not go unnoticed.

President Donald Trump will have a physical exam early next year and will make the results public, the White House said Thursday, a day after the president appeared to slur his words in a public address.

Near the end of his policy remarks Wednesday on Israel, Trump, 71, began having difficulty with words that included the letter “s,” voicing some of them as “sh.” He ended by saying what sounded like “and God bless the United Shtesh.”

At the very end of yesterday’s briefing, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders responded to questions about Trump’s difficulties in speaking by saying, “I know that there were a lot of questions on that – frankly, pretty ridiculous questions. The president’s throat was dry. Nothing more than that.”

But that only fueled additional conversation about the subject. I can think of plenty of times in which I’ve had a dry throat, but it’s never caused me to struggle with the letter “s.”

What’s more, Sanders’ pushback notwithstanding, there’s nothing “ridiculous” about the questions. On his inauguration day, Trump was already the oldest elected president in American history; the issue wasn’t dealt with especially well during the campaign; there have been a variety of questions raised about his stability throughout his first year in office; and during important remarks on foreign policy this week, he seemed to have difficulty saying the words “United States.”

It’s hardly outrageous to think some will have questions about Trump’s health given the circumstances. Indeed, Trump himself invested an enormous amount of time last year questioning Hillary Clinton’s health, so it’s not as if he can plausibly say this is an irrelevant issue that’s somehow off-limits.

For what it’s worth, Sanders added that Trump will have a routine medical exam “early next year” at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center – where most modern presidents have received care – and the results “will be released by the doctor following that taking place.”

Watch this space.

Is Donald Trump’s mental health becoming dangerous? Medical …

President Donald Trump’s temperament has always been a big part of his political brand. Depending on who you ask, he is either refreshingly frank or shockingly unpresidential. But increasingly, critics of the president have gone from criticizing his rhetoric to worrying about his mental fitness for office. His critics now include mental health professionals after several news stories, as well as the president’s own tweets, revealed Trump continues to believe in several thoroughly debunked conspiracy theories.

At no other time in U.S. history has a group of mental health professionals been so collectively concerned about a sitting president. This is not because he is an unusual person — his presentation is almost typical for a forensic psychiatrist like myself whose patients are mostly violence offenders — but it is highly unusual to find such a person in the office of presidency. For the U.S., it may be unprecedented; for many parts of the world where this has happened before, the outcome has been uniformly devastating.

A group of us put our concerns into a book, “The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President.” That book became an instant New York Times bestseller. Within days, it was out of stock at the big outlets and sold out in bookstores around the country. One of the nation’s largest publishers could not keep up with the demand for weeks. Clearly, our concerns were resonating with the public.

0c776_171207-dangerous-case-book-njs-527p_0f9c0d32737a7112dcb51602e0178566.focal-320x417 Is Donald Trump's mental health becoming dangerous? Medical ...
 Diagnosing Donald. Thomas Dunne Books

One way or another, the consequences of Trump’s presidency are affecting pretty much all of us. Much of this has to do with his effects on our own mental health.

For one, Americans are exhausted. The 24/7 news cycle may be part of the reason why, but there’s potentially another explanation. Pathology is confusing to the healthy. There is a reason why staying in close quarters with a person suffering from mental illness usually induces what is called a “shared psychosis.” Vulnerable or weakened individuals are more likely to succumb, and when their own mental health is compromised, they may develop an irresistible attraction to pathology, destruction, and even death (of self or others). The resulting harm is how we tell illness from health.

Politics has nothing to do with medicine, which is why a liberal health professional would not ignore a kidney stone in a patient just because he is Republican. Similarly, health professionals would not call liver cancer something else because it is afflicting the president. When signs of illness become apparent, it is natural for the physician to recommend an exam. But when the ailment goes so far as to affect an individuals ability to perform his duty, and in some cases risks harm to the public as a result, then the health professional has a duty to sound the alarm.

Human beings are an enviably adaptable species. However, when mechanisms go awry and reach a state of disorder, the capacity for variety and diversity diminishes and behavior becomes very predictable. This diminishing of flexibility is as consistent in the failing heart as it is in the cancer cell or the disordered human mind.

It is in this context that we should view Trump’s latest exploits. Special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation is not just a matter of criminal indictments; as Trump feels increasingly walled in, his mental stability is likely to suffer and hence also public safety. Mental impairment and criminal-mindedness are not mutually exclusive; not only can they happen at the same time, when combined, these two characteristics become particularly dangerous. Trump has shown marked signs of impairment and psychological disability under ordinary circumstances, hardly able to cope with basic criticism or unflattering news. Presumably, additional stressors will make his condition worse. So far the signs have been almost too predictable.

It does not take a mental health professional to see that a person of Trump’s impairments, in the office of the presidency, is a danger to us all. What mental health experts can offer is affirmation that these signs are real, that they may be worse than the public suspects, and that the patterns indicate the need for an urgent evaluation (simply trying to “contain” him or asking him to “get over” them will not work).

Simply put, Trump has already exceeded our usual threshold for evaluation. Just some of the signs that have raised red flags include: verbal aggressiveness, boasting about sexual assaults, inciting violence in others, an attraction to violence and powerful weapons and the taunting of hostile nations with nuclear power. Specific traits that are highly associated with violence include: impulsivity, recklessness, paranoia, a loose grip on reality and poor understanding of consequences, a lack of empathy and belligerence toward others, rage reactions and a constant need to demonstrate power. Such traits interfere with the ability to think rationally, to take in needed information or advice, to weigh consequences and to make sound, logical decisions based on reality.

Melania Trump wishes to go to “deserted island” for Christmas, internet agrees

One 10-year-old named asked the first lady, “If you could spend the holidays anywhere in the world, where would you go?” To which she responded: “I would spend my holidays on a deserted island, a tropical island — with my family.” Sounds nice, both for her and the balance of humanity.

Right-wing media hypocrisy: Suddenly Trump’s health is off limits

Alex Jones, Hannity’s rival in conspiracy conservatism, and his Infowars team have also been outraged at the idea of questioning Trump’s physical fitness for office. Last year, however, Jones and his colleagues hyped numerous unsupported stories about Clinton suffering health problems. Like Hannity, they argued that Clinton might be suffering from Parkinson’s disease, but they also claimed that a Secret Service official had told them Clinton suffers seizures from camera flashes, asserted that she might have a brain tumor, said that Clinton required injections to treat seizures, and suggested she might have epilepsy or syphilis. The site even wondered if Clinton might die before Election Day or be forced to drop out of the race for health reasons.

Right-wing media hypocrisy: Suddenly Trump’s health is off limits

Alex Jones, Hannity’s rival in conspiracy conservatism, and his Infowars team have also been outraged at the idea of questioning Trump’s physical fitness for office. Last year, however, Jones and his colleagues hyped numerous unsupported stories about Clinton suffering health problems. Like Hannity, they argued that Clinton might be suffering from Parkinson’s disease, but they also claimed that a Secret Service official had told them Clinton suffers seizures from camera flashes, asserted that she might have a brain tumor, said that Clinton required injections to treat seizures, and suggested she might have epilepsy or syphilis. The site even wondered if Clinton might die before Election Day or be forced to drop out of the race for health reasons.

Right-wing media hypocrisy: Suddenly Trump’s health is off limits

Alex Jones, Hannity’s rival in conspiracy conservatism, and his Infowars team have also been outraged at the idea of questioning Trump’s physical fitness for office. Last year, however, Jones and his colleagues hyped numerous unsupported stories about Clinton suffering health problems. Like Hannity, they argued that Clinton might be suffering from Parkinson’s disease, but they also claimed that a Secret Service official had told them Clinton suffers seizures from camera flashes, asserted that she might have a brain tumor, said that Clinton required injections to treat seizures, and suggested she might have epilepsy or syphilis. The site even wondered if Clinton might die before Election Day or be forced to drop out of the race for health reasons.

Right-wing media hypocrisy: Suddenly Trump’s health is off limits

Alex Jones, Hannity’s rival in conspiracy conservatism, and his Infowars team have also been outraged at the idea of questioning Trump’s physical fitness for office. Last year, however, Jones and his colleagues hyped numerous unsupported stories about Clinton suffering health problems. Like Hannity, they argued that Clinton might be suffering from Parkinson’s disease, but they also claimed that a Secret Service official had told them Clinton suffers seizures from camera flashes, asserted that she might have a brain tumor, said that Clinton required injections to treat seizures, and suggested she might have epilepsy or syphilis. The site even wondered if Clinton might die before Election Day or be forced to drop out of the race for health reasons.

Right-wing media hypocrisy: Suddenly Trump’s health is off limits

Alex Jones, Hannity’s rival in conspiracy conservatism, and his Infowars team have also been outraged at the idea of questioning Trump’s physical fitness for office. Last year, however, Jones and his colleagues hyped numerous unsupported stories about Clinton suffering health problems. Like Hannity, they argued that Clinton might be suffering from Parkinson’s disease, but they also claimed that a Secret Service official had told them Clinton suffers seizures from camera flashes, asserted that she might have a brain tumor, said that Clinton required injections to treat seizures, and suggested she might have epilepsy or syphilis. The site even wondered if Clinton might die before Election Day or be forced to drop out of the race for health reasons.

How Much Will We Find Out About Trump’s Health?

It was only in the 1970s, after Watergate, that there was a sense the presidency should be more transparent, including when it comes to health matters, said John Rogan, a law professor at Fordham University.

Still, there’s no legal requirement that the president get a physical, or that the physical include neurological exams. There’s no requirement that he disclose all of the physical’s contents to the public. Presidents, like everyone else, are protected by medical-privacy laws.

Past presidents’ medical exams have sometimes reported that they are “fit for duty.” That’s a term of art—there’s no quantifiable bar of good health that “fit for duty” implies.

Even if the president’s doctor told him he was suffering from a condition that might impair his functioning in office, like the early stages of dementia, it’s unclear what would happen next. The White House doctor would probably tell an aide or advisor about Trump’s diagnosis, but he also might not. If such a diagnosis were publicly disclosed, the Twenty-Fifth Amendment leaves it to the Cabinet and Vice President Pence to decide whether Trump is unfit to serve. The Cabinet could opt to do nothing. If the Cabinet determines that he’s incapacitated, Trump could contest its finding. If Congress fails to approve the Cabinet’s decision​, it would put the president back in power​.

A Fordham Law Review article, which Rogan oversaw, recommended adding a full-time psychologist to the White House Medical Unit, the medical personnel who already serve the president. But, the article notes, presidents and their staff would probably resist that move, since it would invite rumors that the president needs psychological help.

Others have recommended creating a panel of doctors who would evaluate the president every year. But who would sit on the panel? Two Republicans and two Democrats, and you might have a stalemate as to whether the president’s verbal slip means he is unfit. Two Republicans and one Democrat, or vice versa, and it would look biased.

“So, even if he had Alzheimer’s, we might never know?” I asked McDermott.

“We’d probably know,” she said. “After he dies.”

How Much Will We Find Out About Trump’s Health?

It was only in the 1970s, after Watergate, that there was a sense the presidency should be more transparent, including when it comes to health matters, said John Rogan, a law professor at Fordham University.

Still, there’s no legal requirement that the president get a physical, or that the physical include neurological exams. There’s no requirement that he disclose all of the physical’s contents to the public. Presidents, like everyone else, are protected by medical-privacy laws.

Past presidents’ medical exams have sometimes reported that they are “fit for duty.” That’s a term of art—there’s no quantifiable bar of good health that “fit for duty” implies.

Even if the president’s doctor told him he was suffering from a condition that might impair his functioning in office, like the early stages of dementia, it’s unclear what would happen next. The White House doctor would probably tell an aide or advisor about Trump’s diagnosis, but he also might not. If such a diagnosis were publicly disclosed, the Twenty-Fifth Amendment leaves it to the Cabinet and Vice President Pence to decide whether Trump is unfit to serve. The Cabinet could opt to do nothing. If the Cabinet determines that he’s incapacitated, Trump could contest its finding. If Congress fails to approve the Cabinet’s decision​, it would put the president back in power​.

A Fordham Law Review article, which Rogan oversaw, recommended adding a full-time psychologist to the White House Medical Unit, the medical personnel who already serve the president. But, the article notes, presidents and their staff would probably resist that move, since it would invite rumors that the president needs psychological help.

Others have recommended creating a panel of doctors who would evaluate the president every year. But who would sit on the panel? Two Republicans and two Democrats, and you might have a stalemate as to whether the president’s verbal slip means he is unfit. Two Republicans and one Democrat, or vice versa, and it would look biased.

“So, even if he had Alzheimer’s, we might never know?” I asked McDermott.

“We’d probably know,” she said. “After he dies.”

How Much Will We Find Out About Trump’s Health?

It was only in the 1970s, after Watergate, that there was a sense the presidency should be more transparent, including when it comes to health matters, said John Rogan, a law professor at Fordham University.

Still, there’s no legal requirement that the president get a physical, or that the physical include neurological exams. There’s no requirement that he disclose all of the physical’s contents to the public. Presidents, like everyone else, are protected by medical-privacy laws.

Past presidents’ medical exams have sometimes reported that they are “fit for duty.” That’s a term of art—there’s no quantifiable bar of good health that “fit for duty” implies.

Even if the president’s doctor told him he was suffering from a condition that might impair his functioning in office, like the early stages of dementia, it’s unclear what would happen next. The White House doctor would probably tell an aide or advisor about Trump’s diagnosis, but he also might not. If such a diagnosis were publicly disclosed, the Twenty-Fifth Amendment leaves it to the Cabinet and Vice President Pence to decide whether Trump is unfit to serve. The Cabinet could opt to do nothing. If the Cabinet determines that he’s incapacitated, Trump could contest its finding. If Congress fails to approve the Cabinet’s decision​, it would put the president back in power​.

A Fordham Law Review article, which Rogan oversaw, recommended adding a full-time psychologist to the White House Medical Unit, the medical personnel who already serve the president. But, the article notes, presidents and their staff would probably resist that move, since it would invite rumors that the president needs psychological help.

Others have recommended creating a panel of doctors who would evaluate the president every year. But who would sit on the panel? Two Republicans and two Democrats, and you might have a stalemate as to whether the president’s verbal slip means he is unfit. Two Republicans and one Democrat, or vice versa, and it would look biased.

“So, even if he had Alzheimer’s, we might never know?” I asked McDermott.

“We’d probably know,” she said. “After he dies.”

Innovation of Blockchain: Xunlei’s Trump Card at 4th World Internet Conference

WUZHEN, China, Dec. 8, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Lei Chen, CEO of Xunlei Ltd. (NASDAQ: XNET) and Onething Technologies Co., Ltd., has just wrapped up his journey at the 4th World Internet Conference held in the scenic town of Wuzhen near Shanghai from December 3 to 5. Themed “developing digital economy for openness and shared benefits, building a community of common future in cyberspace”, this annual gathering highlighted global innovation leaders including Apple CEO Tim Cook and Google CEO Sundar Pichai. Mr. Lei Chen was invited to attend the opening ceremony for his innovation in crowd sourced computing and blockchain. He was also interviewed as a representative of technology innovation companies by China Central Television on the same day.

797ad_photo Innovation of Blockchain: Xunlei's Trump Card at 4th World Internet Conference

Having experience exploring crowd sourced computing and blockchain technology for years, Xunlei and its subsidiary Onething Technologies are highly recognized for the achievements they have made. Just in the past two years, Xunlei and OneThing have invested more than USD 100 million in crowd sourced computing and innovative technologies, aiming to resolve the computing resource dilemma. In Onething’s crowd sourced computing mode, smart hardware is deployed in millions of homes to establish the world’s first infinite-node distribution network, so the huge amount of idle bandwidth, storage and other computing resources that are scattered around the network can be aggregated through the exclusive crowd sourced computing technology and timely relocated to Internet-related corporate users at a price far lower than the traditional mode, which not only helps meet the industry’s computing resource demand but also helps them slash costs.

In the third quarter of 2017, Mr. Lei Chen launched OneThing Cloud, a product integrating crowd sourced computing and blockchain, which is revolutionary in using the crowd sourced computing service accessible to individual users. While users can enjoy the enterprise-level personal cloud storage service provided by crowd sourced computing technology, they are also contributors of computing resources and are rewarded for sharing resources. With the innovative integration of blockchain and crowd sourced computing, Xunlei is tapping the potential of crowd sourced computing and accelerating the mass utilization of the blockchain technology to give China a leading position in this respect.

Lei Chen noted in the interview by China Central Television, “The Internet makes the world a village, so the technology of connecting people becomes the core technology. The historic mission of Chinese Internet companies against this backdrop is to establish a closely connected and sophisticated Internet economic community with technology innovation and development. We think that blockchain, cloud computing and sharing economy will play a crucial role in this process.”

China’s technology innovation in blockchain, cloud computing and sharing economy will boost the efficiency of the Internet digital economy. More importantly, it will expand the spectrum of digital economy from enterprise-to-enterprise connection to people-to-people connection, drastically boosting the efficiency of the digital economy.

As a pioneer of blockchain technology in China, Xunlei is endeavoring to make this technology reach more people in China and will be an active promoter to integrate China’s blockchain technology into the global blockchain eco-system. Meanwhile, as cloud computing is becoming the bond linking each country’s Internet technology, the crowd sourced computing mode initiated by Xunlei will effectively address the contradiction between Internet company development and high computing cost. Through crowd sourced computing technology, the computing resources at the hands of massive consumers can be effectively shared, so as to eliminate the resource imbalance in cloud computing brought about by economic imbalance.

Statistics show that by the end of 2016, the crowd sourced computing business of Xunlei and Onething Technologies saved around USD 120 million worth of idle bandwidth, 32 million kilowatt hours of power, and 26,800 tons of carbon dioxide emission.

View original content with multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/innovation-of-blockchain-xunleis-trump-card-at-4th-world-internet-conference-300568877.html

SOURCE Onething Technologies Co., Ltd.

Innovation of Blockchain: Xunlei’s Trump Card at 4th World Internet Conference

WUZHEN, China, Dec. 8, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Lei Chen, CEO of Xunlei Ltd. (NASDAQ: XNET) and Onething Technologies Co., Ltd., has just wrapped up his journey at the 4th World Internet Conference held in the scenic town of Wuzhen near Shanghai from December 3 to 5. Themed “developing digital economy for openness and shared benefits, building a community of common future in cyberspace”, this annual gathering highlighted global innovation leaders including Apple CEO Tim Cook and Google CEO Sundar Pichai. Mr. Lei Chen was invited to attend the opening ceremony for his innovation in crowd sourced computing and blockchain. He was also interviewed as a representative of technology innovation companies by China Central Television on the same day.

797ad_photo Innovation of Blockchain: Xunlei's Trump Card at 4th World Internet Conference

Having experience exploring crowd sourced computing and blockchain technology for years, Xunlei and its subsidiary Onething Technologies are highly recognized for the achievements they have made. Just in the past two years, Xunlei and OneThing have invested more than USD 100 million in crowd sourced computing and innovative technologies, aiming to resolve the computing resource dilemma. In Onething’s crowd sourced computing mode, smart hardware is deployed in millions of homes to establish the world’s first infinite-node distribution network, so the huge amount of idle bandwidth, storage and other computing resources that are scattered around the network can be aggregated through the exclusive crowd sourced computing technology and timely relocated to Internet-related corporate users at a price far lower than the traditional mode, which not only helps meet the industry’s computing resource demand but also helps them slash costs.

In the third quarter of 2017, Mr. Lei Chen launched OneThing Cloud, a product integrating crowd sourced computing and blockchain, which is revolutionary in using the crowd sourced computing service accessible to individual users. While users can enjoy the enterprise-level personal cloud storage service provided by crowd sourced computing technology, they are also contributors of computing resources and are rewarded for sharing resources. With the innovative integration of blockchain and crowd sourced computing, Xunlei is tapping the potential of crowd sourced computing and accelerating the mass utilization of the blockchain technology to give China a leading position in this respect.

Lei Chen noted in the interview by China Central Television, “The Internet makes the world a village, so the technology of connecting people becomes the core technology. The historic mission of Chinese Internet companies against this backdrop is to establish a closely connected and sophisticated Internet economic community with technology innovation and development. We think that blockchain, cloud computing and sharing economy will play a crucial role in this process.”

China’s technology innovation in blockchain, cloud computing and sharing economy will boost the efficiency of the Internet digital economy. More importantly, it will expand the spectrum of digital economy from enterprise-to-enterprise connection to people-to-people connection, drastically boosting the efficiency of the digital economy.

As a pioneer of blockchain technology in China, Xunlei is endeavoring to make this technology reach more people in China and will be an active promoter to integrate China’s blockchain technology into the global blockchain eco-system. Meanwhile, as cloud computing is becoming the bond linking each country’s Internet technology, the crowd sourced computing mode initiated by Xunlei will effectively address the contradiction between Internet company development and high computing cost. Through crowd sourced computing technology, the computing resources at the hands of massive consumers can be effectively shared, so as to eliminate the resource imbalance in cloud computing brought about by economic imbalance.

Statistics show that by the end of 2016, the crowd sourced computing business of Xunlei and Onething Technologies saved around USD 120 million worth of idle bandwidth, 32 million kilowatt hours of power, and 26,800 tons of carbon dioxide emission.

View original content with multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/innovation-of-blockchain-xunleis-trump-card-at-4th-world-internet-conference-300568877.html

SOURCE Onething Technologies Co., Ltd.

Innovation of Blockchain: Xunlei’s Trump Card at 4th World Internet Conference

WUZHEN, China, Dec. 8, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Lei Chen, CEO of Xunlei Ltd. (NASDAQ: XNET) and Onething Technologies Co., Ltd., has just wrapped up his journey at the 4th World Internet Conference held in the scenic town of Wuzhen near Shanghai from December 3 to 5. Themed “developing digital economy for openness and shared benefits, building a community of common future in cyberspace”, this annual gathering highlighted global innovation leaders including Apple CEO Tim Cook and Google CEO Sundar Pichai. Mr. Lei Chen was invited to attend the opening ceremony for his innovation in crowd sourced computing and blockchain. He was also interviewed as a representative of technology innovation companies by China Central Television on the same day.

797ad_photo Innovation of Blockchain: Xunlei's Trump Card at 4th World Internet Conference

Having experience exploring crowd sourced computing and blockchain technology for years, Xunlei and its subsidiary Onething Technologies are highly recognized for the achievements they have made. Just in the past two years, Xunlei and OneThing have invested more than USD 100 million in crowd sourced computing and innovative technologies, aiming to resolve the computing resource dilemma. In Onething’s crowd sourced computing mode, smart hardware is deployed in millions of homes to establish the world’s first infinite-node distribution network, so the huge amount of idle bandwidth, storage and other computing resources that are scattered around the network can be aggregated through the exclusive crowd sourced computing technology and timely relocated to Internet-related corporate users at a price far lower than the traditional mode, which not only helps meet the industry’s computing resource demand but also helps them slash costs.

In the third quarter of 2017, Mr. Lei Chen launched OneThing Cloud, a product integrating crowd sourced computing and blockchain, which is revolutionary in using the crowd sourced computing service accessible to individual users. While users can enjoy the enterprise-level personal cloud storage service provided by crowd sourced computing technology, they are also contributors of computing resources and are rewarded for sharing resources. With the innovative integration of blockchain and crowd sourced computing, Xunlei is tapping the potential of crowd sourced computing and accelerating the mass utilization of the blockchain technology to give China a leading position in this respect.

Lei Chen noted in the interview by China Central Television, “The Internet makes the world a village, so the technology of connecting people becomes the core technology. The historic mission of Chinese Internet companies against this backdrop is to establish a closely connected and sophisticated Internet economic community with technology innovation and development. We think that blockchain, cloud computing and sharing economy will play a crucial role in this process.”

China’s technology innovation in blockchain, cloud computing and sharing economy will boost the efficiency of the Internet digital economy. More importantly, it will expand the spectrum of digital economy from enterprise-to-enterprise connection to people-to-people connection, drastically boosting the efficiency of the digital economy.

As a pioneer of blockchain technology in China, Xunlei is endeavoring to make this technology reach more people in China and will be an active promoter to integrate China’s blockchain technology into the global blockchain eco-system. Meanwhile, as cloud computing is becoming the bond linking each country’s Internet technology, the crowd sourced computing mode initiated by Xunlei will effectively address the contradiction between Internet company development and high computing cost. Through crowd sourced computing technology, the computing resources at the hands of massive consumers can be effectively shared, so as to eliminate the resource imbalance in cloud computing brought about by economic imbalance.

Statistics show that by the end of 2016, the crowd sourced computing business of Xunlei and Onething Technologies saved around USD 120 million worth of idle bandwidth, 32 million kilowatt hours of power, and 26,800 tons of carbon dioxide emission.

View original content with multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/innovation-of-blockchain-xunleis-trump-card-at-4th-world-internet-conference-300568877.html

SOURCE Onething Technologies Co., Ltd.

Innovation of Blockchain: Xunlei’s Trump Card at 4th World Internet Conference

WUZHEN, China, Dec. 8, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Lei Chen, CEO of Xunlei Ltd. (NASDAQ: XNET) and Onething Technologies Co., Ltd., has just wrapped up his journey at the 4th World Internet Conference held in the scenic town of Wuzhen near Shanghai from December 3 to 5. Themed “developing digital economy for openness and shared benefits, building a community of common future in cyberspace”, this annual gathering highlighted global innovation leaders including Apple CEO Tim Cook and Google CEO Sundar Pichai. Mr. Lei Chen was invited to attend the opening ceremony for his innovation in crowd sourced computing and blockchain. He was also interviewed as a representative of technology innovation companies by China Central Television on the same day.

797ad_photo Innovation of Blockchain: Xunlei's Trump Card at 4th World Internet Conference

Having experience exploring crowd sourced computing and blockchain technology for years, Xunlei and its subsidiary Onething Technologies are highly recognized for the achievements they have made. Just in the past two years, Xunlei and OneThing have invested more than USD 100 million in crowd sourced computing and innovative technologies, aiming to resolve the computing resource dilemma. In Onething’s crowd sourced computing mode, smart hardware is deployed in millions of homes to establish the world’s first infinite-node distribution network, so the huge amount of idle bandwidth, storage and other computing resources that are scattered around the network can be aggregated through the exclusive crowd sourced computing technology and timely relocated to Internet-related corporate users at a price far lower than the traditional mode, which not only helps meet the industry’s computing resource demand but also helps them slash costs.

In the third quarter of 2017, Mr. Lei Chen launched OneThing Cloud, a product integrating crowd sourced computing and blockchain, which is revolutionary in using the crowd sourced computing service accessible to individual users. While users can enjoy the enterprise-level personal cloud storage service provided by crowd sourced computing technology, they are also contributors of computing resources and are rewarded for sharing resources. With the innovative integration of blockchain and crowd sourced computing, Xunlei is tapping the potential of crowd sourced computing and accelerating the mass utilization of the blockchain technology to give China a leading position in this respect.

Lei Chen noted in the interview by China Central Television, “The Internet makes the world a village, so the technology of connecting people becomes the core technology. The historic mission of Chinese Internet companies against this backdrop is to establish a closely connected and sophisticated Internet economic community with technology innovation and development. We think that blockchain, cloud computing and sharing economy will play a crucial role in this process.”

China’s technology innovation in blockchain, cloud computing and sharing economy will boost the efficiency of the Internet digital economy. More importantly, it will expand the spectrum of digital economy from enterprise-to-enterprise connection to people-to-people connection, drastically boosting the efficiency of the digital economy.

As a pioneer of blockchain technology in China, Xunlei is endeavoring to make this technology reach more people in China and will be an active promoter to integrate China’s blockchain technology into the global blockchain eco-system. Meanwhile, as cloud computing is becoming the bond linking each country’s Internet technology, the crowd sourced computing mode initiated by Xunlei will effectively address the contradiction between Internet company development and high computing cost. Through crowd sourced computing technology, the computing resources at the hands of massive consumers can be effectively shared, so as to eliminate the resource imbalance in cloud computing brought about by economic imbalance.

Statistics show that by the end of 2016, the crowd sourced computing business of Xunlei and Onething Technologies saved around USD 120 million worth of idle bandwidth, 32 million kilowatt hours of power, and 26,800 tons of carbon dioxide emission.

View original content with multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/innovation-of-blockchain-xunleis-trump-card-at-4th-world-internet-conference-300568877.html

SOURCE Onething Technologies Co., Ltd.

Is Donald Trump’s mental health becoming dangerous? Medical experts weigh in.

President Donald Trump’s temperament has always been a big part of his political brand. Depending on who you ask, he is either refreshingly frank or shockingly unpresidential. But increasingly, critics of the president have gone from criticizing his rhetoric to worrying about his mental fitness for office. His critics now include mental health professionals after several news stories, as well as the president’s own tweets, revealed Trump continues to believe in several thoroughly debunked conspiracy theories.

At no other time in U.S. history has a group of mental health professionals been so collectively concerned about a sitting president. This is not because he is an unusual person — his presentation is almost typical for a forensic psychiatrist like myself whose patients are mostly violence offenders — but it is highly unusual to find such a person in the office of presidency. For the U.S., it may be unprecedented; for many parts of the world where this has happened before, the outcome has been uniformly devastating.

A group of us put our concerns into a book, “The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President.” That book became an instant New York Times bestseller. Within days, it was out of stock at the big outlets and sold out in bookstores around the country. One of the nation’s largest publishers could not keep up with the demand for weeks. Clearly, our concerns were resonating with the public.

d12a8_171207-dangerous-case-book-njs-527p_0f9c0d32737a7112dcb51602e0178566.focal-320x417 Is Donald Trump's mental health becoming dangerous? Medical experts weigh in.
 Diagnosing Donald. Thomas Dunne Books

One way or another, the consequences of Trump’s presidency are affecting pretty much all of us. Much of this has to do with his effects on our own mental health.

For one, Americans are exhausted. The 24/7 news cycle may be part of the reason why, but there’s potentially another explanation. Pathology is confusing to the healthy. There is a reason why staying in close quarters with a person suffering from mental illness usually induces what is called a “shared psychosis.” Vulnerable or weakened individuals are more likely to succumb, and when their own mental health is compromised, they may develop an irresistible attraction to pathology, destruction, and even death (of self or others). The resulting harm is how we tell illness from health.

Politics has nothing to do with medicine, which is why a liberal health professional would not ignore a kidney stone in a patient just because he is Republican. Similarly, health professionals would not call liver cancer something else because it is afflicting the president. When signs of illness become apparent, it is natural for the physician to recommend an exam. But when the ailment goes so far as to affect an individuals ability to perform his duty, and in some cases risks harm to the public as a result, then the health professional has a duty to sound the alarm.

Human beings are an enviably adaptable species. However, when mechanisms go awry and reach a state of disorder, the capacity for variety and diversity diminishes and behavior becomes very predictable. This diminishing of flexibility is as consistent in the failing heart as it is in the cancer cell or the disordered human mind.

Lawmakers Press Trump Health Official On Marijuana As Opioid Alternative

A bipartisan group of members of Congress is pushing the Trump administration to consider medical marijuana as a safer alternative to opioids.

“As you know, our country is grappling with an opioid epidemic that is now taking 91 lives every single day,” the lawmakers wrote in a letter to Acting Health and Human Services Secretary (HHS) Eric D. Hargan. “Recent studies published by qualified academic researchers suggest that marijuana may prove to be a useful alternative treatment for chronic pain instead of harmful, addictive prescription opioids, and that marijuana may reduce the overall number of opioid overdose deaths.”

After citing a number of studies demonstrating cannabis’s efficacy and that legal marijuana access is associated with reduced opioid issues, the House members lay out a series of questions they want answered:

The evidence that marijuana may have a positive therapeutic warrants additional attention from the federal government. We request that you provide answers to the following questions:

1. Please describe in detail what the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is doing to fill the gap in our knowledge about the use, uptake, and effectiveness of medical marijuana as an alternative to opioids for pain treatment in states where it is legal.

a. Please describe in detail any federal efforts to conduct research the impact of state medical and recreational marijuana laws on opioid overdose deaths.

b. Please also describe in detail efforts by other federal agencies under the jurisdiction of HHS.

2. Please describe in detail what HHS and other federal agencies are doing to work with states that have implemented medical marijuana laws to collect data on the impact of these laws on opioid overdose deaths.

3. Is HHS committed to implementing evidence-based policies regarding the use of medical marijuana as an alternative pain treatment in an effort to promote public health?

4. Is HHS committed to making any research on the therapeutic benefits of marijuana available to states including as a more benign alternative to opioids for pain management, so that they can implement evidence-based policies to address the opioid epidemic?

5. Please describe in detail any ongoing efforts to share this research on marijuana’s potential as an alternative pain treatment to addictive and dangerous prescription medications with other federal agencies, including but not limited to the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the Drug Enforcement Administration, and the Department of Justice.

“We should not ignore any information that suggests there may be a tool available to fight the opioid epidemic that we are not using to the fullest extent,” the legislators conclude in the letter, which is dated Tuesday. “While it is clear that more research is necessary, it is equally clear that medical marijuana is an alternative pain treatment that merits the attention of the federal government.”

Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) posted a series of tweets about the issue on Thursday evening.

The letter comes amid increasingly prominent discussion about marijuana’s potential to reduce opioid overdoses. The federal government’s top health research official was asked about the topic in two separate Senate hearings this week.

Legal Marijuana Tied To Opioid Death Reductions, Federal Health Official Says

Last week, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) sent questions about marijuana and opioids to Alex Azar, President Trump’s nominee for HHS secretary.

See the full text of the House lawmakers’ new letter below:

Members of Congress: Marijuana Is An Opioid Alternative by tomangell on Scribd

31cd4_become_a_patron_button Lawmakers Press Trump Health Official On Marijuana As Opioid Alternative




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