Advertise here
Advertise here

travel

now browsing by tag

 
 

iPhone X is a great travel companion – Business Insider


54a2c_gettyimages-846148982 iPhone X is a great travel companion - Business Insider
The Apple iPhone X is a
near-perfect travel buddy.

Getty

  • I took my new iPhone X with me on a weeks-long vacation
    to Italy, forgoing a laptop or tablet.
  • The phone’s camera and the battery life made it an
    amazing travel buddy, and I never felt like I needed a “real”
    digital camera.
  • But the experience wasn’t perfect. Among other things,
    the nearly borderless screen on its front made the phone
    unwieldy to use at times.

Every November when my partner and I take our big annual
vacation, I take along some kind of computer, just in case I need
it.

Typically I bring along a laptop, and last year, I tried using a
hybrid tablet-notebook. On this year’s journey — a whirlwind
three-week tour of Italy — I decided to travel even lighter. The
only computer I took along was my iPhone X.

I had just replaced my trusty old iPhone 6S, and I was eager to
see how far my fancy new $999 smartphone could take me. The
answer: Pretty darn far!

Here’s what I liked and didn’t like about having the iPhone X as
my travel companion.

The iPhone X’s camera is amazing, and I never wished I had a
“real” camera

The iPhone X’s camera is really, really good. I’m not a camera
expert, so I don’t know how it stacks up against, say, that of
the Google Pixel 2. All I know is that it’s amazing, and I never
for a second wished I had brought a “real” digital camera with
me. Instead, the iPhone X makes for a perfect vacation
point-and-shoot camera.

I mean, check this out:


54a2c_gettyimages-846148982 iPhone X is a great travel companion - Business Insider
The
town of Sorrento, on Italy’s Amalfi Coast, as viewed through the
lens of the iPhone X.

Matt
Weinberger/Business Insider


I’m biased because I took that picture, but it’s pretty good,
right? 

And the iPhone X’s
Portrait Mode
, which blurs the background to create
professional-looking photos, is extra-fun when you have busy
Italian scenes in the background, like so:


54a2c_gettyimages-846148982 iPhone X is a great travel companion - Business Insider
That’s
the Castel dell’Ovo, a major Naples landmark, blurred in the
background.

Matt Weinberger/Business
Insider


Better yet, it turns out that Portrait Mode was the ideal way to
capture every noodle and dollop of sauce in the pasta we ate
across Italy:


54a2c_gettyimages-846148982 iPhone X is a great travel companion - Business Insider
Gnocchi
from Tandem, a terrific restaurant in the heart of
Naples.

Matt Weinberger/Business
Insider


I won’t bore you with another vacation photo, but I particularly
loved the iPhone X’s second rear camera, which has a zoom lens.
Its 2X optical zoom allows you to focus in on objects without
losing image quality. It’s really helpful for getting that
perfect photo.

The phone’s battery life is pretty great

The battery in my iPhone 6S left a lot to be desired. Wherever I
took it, I had to bring along at least one external battery pack.
Heck, I’d routinely run down 25% of the battery just on my normal
commute.

It was even worse when I was traveling. I typically rely on the
battery-intensive Google Maps to get around. And I’m the annoying
tourist who takes photos of everything, which curtailed my
battery life even more.

So my iPhone X was a wonderful change. I still carried around my
external battery pack out of habit, but I didn’t need to use it
once on our all-day journeys. My phone got close to running out
of battery life a few times, thanks to long days or late nights,
but every single time it held out until we got back to our room.

I haven’t done any scientific testing on the iPhone X’s battery
versus those of other smartphones. But I do know that for my
purposes, my new phone’s battery life was great. 

But the iPhone X isn’t perfect

My colleague
Dennis Green sold his iPhone X
because he hated how hard it
was for him to use with one hand. I don’t feel as strongly as he
did, but he had a point.

I’m a fan of the iPhone X’s big, nearly borderless screen. But
its design can make the phone hard to use at times. For example,
it can be difficult with one hand to access the control panel to
adjust the volume or the screen’s brightness, in part because
Apple relocated it to the top-right corner of the display.

The result of such design decisions was that instead of paying
attention to my surroundings, I had to worry about how I was
holding my phone. They also made it more likely I would drop it
when I was trying to take in the sights, such as Michelangelo’s
David.

I’ve also been underwhelmed by Apple’s FaceID facial recognition
system that you use to unlock the iPhone X. It works OK for the
most part. But when I was on a bouncing coastal bus, a poorly lit
train, or was just speed-walking to dinner, it frequently
required multiple tries to recognize me.

Getting rid of the headphone jack still stinks

Much as I like the iPhone X, I’m still not happy Apple decided to
get rid of the headphone jack in it and the other new iPhones.
Most of the time, the lack of a headphone jack isn’t a big
problem. But when you’re on an airplane and you can’t charge your
phone at the same time that you’re listening on your headphones
to the movie you’re watching? Sheesh. That’s frustrating.

Microsoft Garage launches Outings travel companion app on iOS, Android

94bf2_microsoft-outings-android Microsoft Garage launches Outings travel companion app on iOS, Android

Microsoft’s experimental Garage division has launched its latest mobile app, Outings.

Microsoft Outings is intended to act as a digital travel guide, offering up a selection of interesting places to visit based on your interests. As first spotted by Microsoft leaker WalkingCat on Twitter, the app is now available on Android and iOS after having been discovered in testing earlier in 2017.

Upon firing up Outings, you’ll be asked to select from a huge range of topics and landscapes you’re interested in. After choosing from options like marine life, leisure activities, and night skies, Outings will then serve up a list of places you may be interested in checking out on future trips with a card-like interface. You can save ideas to make a bucket list of places to visit, or just share options with friends.

Here’s a look at what to expect, according to Microsoft:

  • Stunning images: Let photos give you an immediate feel for the whole adventure that awaits you.
  • Get inspired to explore: Choose topics that interest you and swipe through travel stories tailored just for you.
  • Save and share with friends: Instantly save your next trip to a folder for safe keeping. Share them with friends and family on social media, so they can be inspired and you can get trips on the calendar.

Outings certainly looks like an interesting option if you’re bitten by the travel bug. If you want to check it out, Outings is now available to download for both Android and iOS.

See at Google Play See at the App Store

Podcast: How space travel affects human health

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to leave Earth?

Floating around the International Space Station and exploring new worlds may sound exciting, but space travel also poses a unique set of pretty intense health effects. Changes in gravitational force and radiation can cause physical harm to the body, while being in a small, isolated environment can take a toll on mental wellbeing. And that’s just the start of it!

Since the inception of our national and international space programs, researchers have been studying the myriad effects of spaceflight on health in hopes of developing better countermeasures as we venture farther into space.

In this episode of our podcast, we talked with Dr. Allie Anderson at the University of Colorado Boulder. Dr. Anderson describes “puffy face bird leg” syndrome (yes, that’s a thing) among other health impacts of space travel and what hot topics are keeping folks in space medicine busy.

Want more? Subscribe and listen on iTunes or Google Play, or check out Podbean to listen via desktop!

It’s the Grim Reality of Frequent Work Travel: Health Problems

In 2011, Catherine Richards, a doctor at Boston Health Economics, and Dr. Andrew Rundle, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University, co-authored a report, “Business Travel Linked to Obesity and Poor Health,” published by the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia.

That study tracked the body mass index; levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, what’s known as “bad” cholesterol; and self-rated healthiness of more than 13,000 business travelers. Dr. Rundle, who has just completed a follow-up study, said the new findings, currently under peer review, “are pretty much the same as the old ones,” he said. ‘What we’re seeing is kind of like a U-shaped curve. People who travel the most and people who don’t travel at all have the worst health.”

An explanation for nontravelers’ poor health may be that chronic conditions prevent them from boarding planes in the first place, he said. The culprits of the poor health among constant travelers are the usual suspects: bad airport food, uneven exercise habits and jet lag. If there is a sweet spot, Dr. Rundle said, it may be with those who travel for work only a few times a year.

Dr. Rundle, who lives in western Massachusetts and commutes to Manhattan about five days a month, said he was inspired to look into the health effects of professional travel by his own experience. On a business trip, he said, he learned his options were limited to ordering dinner from a Cheesecake Factory restaurant. “I was just, like, this is not good,” he said. “Catherine and I started looking at business travelers’ B.M.I. data.”

Photo

6abb9_28ITINERARIES2-master675 It's the Grim Reality of Frequent Work Travel: Health Problems

Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky consults with a patient at the TravelWell clinic in Atlanta, where she is the director. She said patients tend to hide from their employers and families the toll that travel stress takes on them.

Credit
Melissa Golden for The New York Times

What they found in the initial study was that the average body mass index of travelers who are on the road 21 or more nights a month was higher than in travelers who were away from home one to six nights per month. “For a 6-foot-tall person, the difference amounted to a 10-pound difference in weight.

That finding supports what Dr. Rundle said he suspected was a problem for traveling employees. “If you’re in your 30s and you’re traveling a lot and you’re eating poorly and you have poor access to physical activity, that starts to catch up with you,” he said. “Over the next 10 years or so, the consequences start to become things like high blood pressure and diabetes and obesity. Long-term chronic issues.”

His yet-unpublished sequel study looks more closely at business travelers’ mental health — an area both Dr. Cetron at the C.D.C. and Dr. Chen at the International Society of Travel Medicine said was important but fell outside their purview. It includes factors like alcohol abuse and accidents and injuries caused by lack of sleep and jet lag. “These are things that can have really immediate consequences for yourself and your career,” he said.

Newsletter Sign Up

Continue reading the main story

A Harvard Business Review article in 2015 noted that frequent business travel accelerates aging and increases the likelihood of suffering a stroke or heart attack, and that more than 70 percent of business travelers report some symptoms of an unhealthy lifestyle, including poor diet, lack of exercise, excess drinking, stress, mood swings and gastrointestinal problems. “All of which impair job performance,” it said.

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

If corporations are taking note, they’re not always taking action. “Travelers themselves are concerned about their health and the amount of time they’re away from home,” said Greeley Koch, executive director of the Association of Corporate Travel Executives, a nonprofit organization with board members from companies including MasterCard and Tesla. Policies to limit travel, or to make it less toxic through measures like upgrades to business class or added time for taking in fresh air during a work trip, depend on bosses and are entirely unregulated, he said. “It’s really a mixed bag when it comes to addressing these issues. It depends on the company.”

Doctors like Phyllis Kozarsky, a professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at Emory University School of Medicine and the medical director of TravelWell, a clinic in Atlanta for international travelers, said they see the need for more company attention to the issue.

“A lot of times, I’ll have people come in and say, ‘I was in so-and-so country, and I think I have a sinus infection,’” she said. “Then when I close the door to the exam room, they’ll burst out crying. They made the appointment ostensibly for a sinus infection, but they’re so tired and worn out from traveling that they just need to see someone and talk about it. They don’t want to share it with their business because they’re concerned about walking up the corporate ladder and their ability to succeed.”

Sharing tales of travel weariness at home may not be an option, either.

“I’ll hear things like, ‘My kid had a performance last week and my husband’s upset with me because I wasn’t there,’ or ‘I can’t do this any more and I don’t know how to tell my family,’” Dr. Kozarsky said. “You’re leaving people at home who are not happy you’re gone for a number of reasons, and when you get home you’re trying to catch up on all the things that happened while you were gone, but all you can think about is how tired you are. The only thing you can do as a doctor is to reassure them, to give people permission to feel the way they’re feeling.”

A frequent traveler, Brian Kelly, founder of the Points Guy, a digital platform for travel tips, said his world had been “flipped upside-down” when his dog had an illness recently. “It makes me sick to my stomach to think of leaving him. I have this business, and I have all these events I need to go to, but all I want to do is stay home and take care of my dog. In the back of my mind I know I need to take a 30-day health break,” he said.

Such a break would set off its own work-related stressors, though, he said.

And that is in keeping with what Dr. Centron of the C.D.C. has been seeing.

“Things are merging and changing in the world of business travel,” he said. “Whether trips are frequent short ones or long ones, the intensity of travel schedules is putting people under a lot of pressure.”

Continue reading the main story

It’s the Grim Reality of Frequent Work Travel: Health Problems

In 2011, Catherine Richards, a doctor at Boston Health Economics, and Dr. Andrew Rundle, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University, co-authored a report, “Business Travel Linked to Obesity and Poor Health,” published by the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia.

That study tracked the body mass index; levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, what’s known as “bad” cholesterol; and self-rated healthiness of more than 13,000 business travelers. Dr. Rundle, who has just completed a follow-up study, said the new findings, currently under peer review, “are pretty much the same as the old ones,” he said. ‘What we’re seeing is kind of like a U-shaped curve. People who travel the most and people who don’t travel at all have the worst health.”

An explanation for nontravelers’ poor health may be that chronic conditions prevent them from boarding planes in the first place, he said. The culprits of the poor health among constant travelers are the usual suspects: bad airport food, uneven exercise habits and jet lag. If there is a sweet spot, Dr. Rundle said, it may be with those who travel for work only a few times a year.

Dr. Rundle, who lives in western Massachusetts and commutes to Manhattan about five days a month, said he was inspired to look into the health effects of professional travel by his own experience. On a business trip, he said, he learned his options were limited to ordering dinner from a Cheesecake Factory restaurant. “I was just, like, this is not good,” he said. “Catherine and I started looking at business travelers’ B.M.I. data.”

Photo

6abb9_28ITINERARIES2-master675 It's the Grim Reality of Frequent Work Travel: Health Problems

Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky consults with a patient at the TravelWell clinic in Atlanta, where she is the director. She said patients tend to hide from their employers and families the toll that travel stress takes on them.

Credit
Melissa Golden for The New York Times

What they found in the initial study was that the average body mass index of travelers who are on the road 21 or more nights a month was higher than in travelers who were away from home one to six nights per month. “For a 6-foot-tall person, the difference amounted to a 10-pound difference in weight.

That finding supports what Dr. Rundle said he suspected was a problem for traveling employees. “If you’re in your 30s and you’re traveling a lot and you’re eating poorly and you have poor access to physical activity, that starts to catch up with you,” he said. “Over the next 10 years or so, the consequences start to become things like high blood pressure and diabetes and obesity. Long-term chronic issues.”

His yet-unpublished sequel study looks more closely at business travelers’ mental health — an area both Dr. Cetron at the C.D.C. and Dr. Chen at the International Society of Travel Medicine said was important but fell outside their purview. It includes factors like alcohol abuse and accidents and injuries caused by lack of sleep and jet lag. “These are things that can have really immediate consequences for yourself and your career,” he said.

Newsletter Sign Up

Continue reading the main story

A Harvard Business Review article in 2015 noted that frequent business travel accelerates aging and increases the likelihood of suffering a stroke or heart attack, and that more than 70 percent of business travelers report some symptoms of an unhealthy lifestyle, including poor diet, lack of exercise, excess drinking, stress, mood swings and gastrointestinal problems. “All of which impair job performance,” it said.

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

If corporations are taking note, they’re not always taking action. “Travelers themselves are concerned about their health and the amount of time they’re away from home,” said Greeley Koch, executive director of the Association of Corporate Travel Executives, a nonprofit organization with board members from companies including MasterCard and Tesla. Policies to limit travel, or to make it less toxic through measures like upgrades to business class or added time for taking in fresh air during a work trip, depend on bosses and are entirely unregulated, he said. “It’s really a mixed bag when it comes to addressing these issues. It depends on the company.”

Doctors like Phyllis Kozarsky, a professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at Emory University School of Medicine and the medical director of TravelWell, a clinic in Atlanta for international travelers, said they see the need for more company attention to the issue.

“A lot of times, I’ll have people come in and say, ‘I was in so-and-so country, and I think I have a sinus infection,’” she said. “Then when I close the door to the exam room, they’ll burst out crying. They made the appointment ostensibly for a sinus infection, but they’re so tired and worn out from traveling that they just need to see someone and talk about it. They don’t want to share it with their business because they’re concerned about walking up the corporate ladder and their ability to succeed.”

Sharing tales of travel weariness at home may not be an option, either.

“I’ll hear things like, ‘My kid had a performance last week and my husband’s upset with me because I wasn’t there,’ or ‘I can’t do this any more and I don’t know how to tell my family,’” Dr. Kozarsky said. “You’re leaving people at home who are not happy you’re gone for a number of reasons, and when you get home you’re trying to catch up on all the things that happened while you were gone, but all you can think about is how tired you are. The only thing you can do as a doctor is to reassure them, to give people permission to feel the way they’re feeling.”

A frequent traveler, Brian Kelly, founder of the Points Guy, a digital platform for travel tips, said his world had been “flipped upside-down” when his dog had an illness recently. “It makes me sick to my stomach to think of leaving him. I have this business, and I have all these events I need to go to, but all I want to do is stay home and take care of my dog. In the back of my mind I know I need to take a 30-day health break,” he said.

Such a break would set off its own work-related stressors, though, he said.

And that is in keeping with what Dr. Centron of the C.D.C. has been seeing.

“Things are merging and changing in the world of business travel,” he said. “Whether trips are frequent short ones or long ones, the intensity of travel schedules is putting people under a lot of pressure.”

Continue reading the main story

It’s the Grim Reality of Frequent Work Travel: Health Problems

In 2011, Catherine Richards, a doctor at Boston Health Economics, and Dr. Andrew Rundle, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University, co-authored a report, “Business Travel Linked to Obesity and Poor Health,” published by the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia.

That study tracked the body mass index; levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, what’s known as “bad” cholesterol; and self-rated healthiness of more than 13,000 business travelers. Dr. Rundle, who has just completed a follow-up study, said the new findings, currently under peer review, “are pretty much the same as the old ones,” he said. ‘What we’re seeing is kind of like a U-shaped curve. People who travel the most and people who don’t travel at all have the worst health.”

An explanation for nontravelers’ poor health may be that chronic conditions prevent them from boarding planes in the first place, he said. The culprits of the poor health among constant travelers are the usual suspects: bad airport food, uneven exercise habits and jet lag. If there is a sweet spot, Dr. Rundle said, it may be with those who travel for work only a few times a year.

Dr. Rundle, who lives in western Massachusetts and commutes to Manhattan about five days a month, said he was inspired to look into the health effects of professional travel by his own experience. On a business trip, he said, he learned his options were limited to ordering dinner from a Cheesecake Factory restaurant. “I was just, like, this is not good,” he said. “Catherine and I started looking at business travelers’ B.M.I. data.”

Photo

6abb9_28ITINERARIES2-master675 It's the Grim Reality of Frequent Work Travel: Health Problems

Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky consults with a patient at the TravelWell clinic in Atlanta, where she is the director. She said patients tend to hide from their employers and families the toll that travel stress takes on them.

Credit
Melissa Golden for The New York Times

What they found in the initial study was that the average body mass index of travelers who are on the road 21 or more nights a month was higher than in travelers who were away from home one to six nights per month. “For a 6-foot-tall person, the difference amounted to a 10-pound difference in weight.

That finding supports what Dr. Rundle said he suspected was a problem for traveling employees. “If you’re in your 30s and you’re traveling a lot and you’re eating poorly and you have poor access to physical activity, that starts to catch up with you,” he said. “Over the next 10 years or so, the consequences start to become things like high blood pressure and diabetes and obesity. Long-term chronic issues.”

His yet-unpublished sequel study looks more closely at business travelers’ mental health — an area both Dr. Cetron at the C.D.C. and Dr. Chen at the International Society of Travel Medicine said was important but fell outside their purview. It includes factors like alcohol abuse and accidents and injuries caused by lack of sleep and jet lag. “These are things that can have really immediate consequences for yourself and your career,” he said.

Newsletter Sign Up

Continue reading the main story

A Harvard Business Review article in 2015 noted that frequent business travel accelerates aging and increases the likelihood of suffering a stroke or heart attack, and that more than 70 percent of business travelers report some symptoms of an unhealthy lifestyle, including poor diet, lack of exercise, excess drinking, stress, mood swings and gastrointestinal problems. “All of which impair job performance,” it said.

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

If corporations are taking note, they’re not always taking action. “Travelers themselves are concerned about their health and the amount of time they’re away from home,” said Greeley Koch, executive director of the Association of Corporate Travel Executives, a nonprofit organization with board members from companies including MasterCard and Tesla. Policies to limit travel, or to make it less toxic through measures like upgrades to business class or added time for taking in fresh air during a work trip, depend on bosses and are entirely unregulated, he said. “It’s really a mixed bag when it comes to addressing these issues. It depends on the company.”

Doctors like Phyllis Kozarsky, a professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at Emory University School of Medicine and the medical director of TravelWell, a clinic in Atlanta for international travelers, said they see the need for more company attention to the issue.

“A lot of times, I’ll have people come in and say, ‘I was in so-and-so country, and I think I have a sinus infection,’” she said. “Then when I close the door to the exam room, they’ll burst out crying. They made the appointment ostensibly for a sinus infection, but they’re so tired and worn out from traveling that they just need to see someone and talk about it. They don’t want to share it with their business because they’re concerned about walking up the corporate ladder and their ability to succeed.”

Sharing tales of travel weariness at home may not be an option, either.

“I’ll hear things like, ‘My kid had a performance last week and my husband’s upset with me because I wasn’t there,’ or ‘I can’t do this any more and I don’t know how to tell my family,’” Dr. Kozarsky said. “You’re leaving people at home who are not happy you’re gone for a number of reasons, and when you get home you’re trying to catch up on all the things that happened while you were gone, but all you can think about is how tired you are. The only thing you can do as a doctor is to reassure them, to give people permission to feel the way they’re feeling.”

A frequent traveler, Brian Kelly, founder of the Points Guy, a digital platform for travel tips, said his world had been “flipped upside-down” when his dog had an illness recently. “It makes me sick to my stomach to think of leaving him. I have this business, and I have all these events I need to go to, but all I want to do is stay home and take care of my dog. In the back of my mind I know I need to take a 30-day health break,” he said.

Such a break would set off its own work-related stressors, though, he said.

And that is in keeping with what Dr. Centron of the C.D.C. has been seeing.

“Things are merging and changing in the world of business travel,” he said. “Whether trips are frequent short ones or long ones, the intensity of travel schedules is putting people under a lot of pressure.”

Continue reading the main story

Popular travel app Hitlist launches Android version

SAN FRANSISCO – Hitlist, the AI based travel app that has already helped over a million people save money on airfare, has released an Android version of their popular iPhone app. After 4 years on iOS and over $20 million saved for travelers around the globe, the company made the foray into Android based on feedback from users.

CEO and founder Gillian Morris said “We’ve always wanted to have apps out there for both major platforms. Android is more complicated to support thanks to the variety of screen sizes and versions, but users of our other products, like Wandertab, have been asking for it for years, so we had to do this for them. Being live on Android gives us the opportunity to make travel more affordable and accessible for millions more people around the world. We’re excited to be able to do that.”

Hitlist for iOS has been featured in the New York Times, TIME magazine, TechCrunch, VentureBeat, The Next Web, LifeHacker, CNBC and is famous for often saving people 50% or more on flights. In the new Android app, which is free to use, users set their home airport and build a “Hitlist” of destinations. The app uses Artificial Intelligence to search through approximately 50 million flight deals a day and when it finds deals to those locations the user immediately gets a notification to purchase before the deal goes away. Within a few clicks they can book the flight and be on their way to planning next steps. The company links into Booking.com, Airbnb, HotelTonight, Hotels.com and Tablet hotels to make Hitlist more of a one stop shop for travelers as well. Find a flight deal, and book your hotel all in few clicks. The goal, Morris says is “saving you time and money so you can travel more for less.” Unlike many flight deal newsletters and websites, Hitlist users can tailor their alerts by type of destination, region, and type of trip – from specific dates to “long weekend” to “8-10 days in February”. To manually do this would literally be a full time job. Hitlist’s deal sorting algorithms are fully automated but trained by user feedback, so they become better at distinguishing what will interest each individual user over time.

“We want Hitlist to be like a trusted friend who knows everything about the travel industry but also enough about you to recommend exactly what you’re looking for,” says Morris. Don’t really know what cities you’d like to visit? Not a problem, because Hitlist is full of travel discovery and inspiration as well. Within the app, users can track friends’ trips and follow favorite travel influencers to discover new destinations based on where your network is going. With Hitlist’s Explore Lists (see image below) you can discover new destinations via unique categories like cities with amazing kiteboarding, destinations where the dollar is strong and more.

Feeling footloose on Thursday? Find an incredible deal for a weekend trip (usually several options under $100 in the U.S) in Hitlist and it will be hard to make an excuse not to leave. 

Last year the company was featured as one of TIME Magazine’s Best Apps of 2016 and was featured as ‘App of the Day’ at Apple’s WWDC. Morris is also a widely recognized travel expert who has written for Harvard Business Review and contributed to articles in Forbes, Fortune, Inc, Skift, Conde Nast Traveler, and more. The company partners with Destination Management Organizations and other travel brands to provide unique advertising options to travel and deal focused millennials.

Hitlist lands on Android to help you find bargain travel deals


4df45_hitlist Hitlist lands on Android to help you find bargain travel deals

Hitlist, an app that serves up bargain-priced flights and travels deals, has finally winged its way to Android after years on iOS and the web.

The service is simple: you tell it where you live and it will sort through millions of deals from travel partners to find you discounted flights to nearby destinations that you can go ahead and book from your phone.

A more sophisticated feature inside the app lets you keep a list of running list of destinations you’d like to visit. You key in some basic details, such as tentative dates and price, and when a related deal pops up, the app will notify you, giving you one less excuse to avoid booking that dream trip.

The advanced feature — which requires users to register for a Hitlist account — also includes social features that let you view friends’ lists, destination guides, flexiblefuzzy date searches and hotel booking options. The more info you feed Hitlist, the better it becomes at figuring out what you’re into. It’s a beautiful virtuous travel circle that’s intended to plunk you on the beach, or another exotic location, with extra cash in your pocket, too.

Histlist began four years ago out of a hackathon project and, having faithfully served iOS device owners and web users via its highly addictive Wantertab Chrome extension, it is now making the move to Android devices to reach more deal-seekers.

You can download it for Android right here.

“We’ve always wanted to have apps out there for both major platforms. Android is more complicated to support thanks to the variety of screen sizes and versions, but users of our other products, like Wandertab, have been asking for it for years, so we had to do this for them,” Gillian Morris, CEO of TripCommon — the startup that operates Hitlist — said in a statement.

Morris told TechCrunch that the service has saved its customers over $20 million in travel deals since it started out.

The ‘time travel’ 1860 painting that appears to show a woman engrossed in an IPHONE

  • Scene was spotted in 19th century Waldmüller painting at the Neue Pinakothek
  • It shows a woman walking down a path, appearing to hold a smartphone
  • Despite the uncanny resemblence experts say she’s holding a hymnbook

Cheyenne Macdonald For Dailymail.com

202

View
comments

At first glance, it appears a baffling anachronism – a woman in 19th century dress walking head down through the countryside, with her eyes glued to a smartphone.

The bizarre scene was spotted in an 1850s Waldmüller painting at the Neue Pinakothek museum in Munich by retired Glasgow local government officer Peter Russell.

While the true explanation behind the painting may be far more time-appropriate, the century-old piece bears remarkable similarity to a scene that’s become all too familiar today, as ‘distracted walkers’ dominate the sidewalks with phone in hand.

14599_464EE41200000578-0-image-m-37_1510600808189 The 'time travel' 1860 painting that appears to show a woman engrossed in an IPHONE

At first glance, it appears a baffling anachronism – a woman in 19th century dress walking head down through the countryside, with her eyes glued to a smartphone. The bizarre scene was spotted in an 1850s Waldmüller painting

THE PAINTING 

The  scene was spotted in an 1850s Waldmüller painting called The Expected One, at the Neue Pinakothek museum.

It was painted by Austrian artist Ferdinand Georg Waldmüllerin 1850 or 60.

According to the gallery, the painting is also known as ‘Sunday Morning,’ and shows the two characters dressed in their Sunday clothes.

As the boy awaits the arrival of ‘his love,’ the girl appears engrossed in her hymnbook, leaving the viewer wondering if his feelings will be reciprocated. 

The piece, titled The Expected One, was painted by Austrian artist Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller around 1850-60.

It shows a woman walking down a rocky dirt path, as a kneeling man awaits her approach not far ahead, with a pink flower in his hand.

With her attention focused on the small rectangular object she’s clutching, the similarity to modern distracted walkers is striking.

But, the object in her hands is not a smartphone, but a hymnbook.

‘What strikes me most is how much a change in technology has changed the interpretation of the painting, and in a way has leveraged its entire context,’ Russell told Motherboard.

‘The big change is that in 1850 or 1860, every single viewer would have identified the item that the girl is absorbed in as a hymnal or prayer book.

‘Today, no one could fail to see the resemblance to the scene of a teenage girl absorbed in social media on their smartphone.’

Russell first pointed out the strange scene in response to a similar story, in which a mural of colonial America appeared to show a Native American man holding a smartphone.

14599_464EE41200000578-0-image-m-37_1510600808189 The 'time travel' 1860 painting that appears to show a woman engrossed in an IPHONE

While the true explanation behind the painting may be far more time-appropriate, the century-old piece bears remarkable similarity to a scene that’s become all too familiar today, as ‘distracted walkers’ dominate the sidewalks with phone in hand

In a tweet replying to the Motherboard article, Russell shared an image of the Waldmüller painting, writing: ‘Just like her on the dating app in Waldmüller’s Die Erwartete (c. 1850)’.

These bizarre likenesses have, in the past, sparked countless conspiracy theories about time travel and other strange phenomena.

But, there’s no question that the woman in the painting is holding a prayer book, and not a 21st century device.

According to the gallery, the painting is also known as ‘Sunday Morning,’ and shows the two characters dressed in their Sunday clothes.

As the boy awaits the arrival of ‘his love,’ the girl appears engrossed in her hymnbook, leaving the viewer wondering if his feelings will be reciprocated. 


14599_464EE41200000578-0-image-m-37_1510600808189 The 'time travel' 1860 painting that appears to show a woman engrossed in an IPHONE

Comments 200

Share what you think

The comments below have not been moderated.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Close

 

Close

We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.

You can choose on each post whether you would like it to be posted to Facebook. Your details from Facebook will be used to provide you with tailored content, marketing and ads in line with our Privacy Policy.

Aspiring astronauts: Beware of the health risks of space travel

Astronauts face the hostile space environment on their travels. How can we keep them safe in their interstellar journeys?

Space: the final frontier. But before we embark on voyages to strange new worlds, we must first find ways of keeping our astronauts’ brains from swelling and their hearts from being damaged. Researchers say we are on the right track.

Like many others, I dreamt of being an astronaut when I was younger. Inspired by a trip to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida in my early teens, I saw myself boldly going where no man had gone before.

The problem is that I don’t particularly like heights, or flying, for that matter. With my feet firmly rooted on the ground, my curiosity took me into the field of human biology instead. But my interest in all things to do with galaxies far, far away never faltered.

So, I hope you appreciate my excitement about two new papers dealing with the effects of spaceflight on the human body.

Many people will be familiar with the concept that during time in space, astronauts’ muscles shrink because of the lack of gravity. But it’s not just the muscles that are affected.

“The whole body is under stress in the space environment, and the different stressor (microgravity, radiation, psychological, etc.) are entangled,” Prof. Marco Durante, from the Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications in Italy, told me.

Prof. Durante and his colleagues published an article about the effects of space on the cardiovascular system in Nature Reviews Cardiology a couple of weeks ago.

But, before we delve into the effects of extraterrestrial experiences on the heart, let’s look first at research hot off the press on how space distorts the brain.

Brain shifts upward on long-term missions

Astronauts live in virtually weightless conditions during their space travels. The scientific term for this is microgravity.

Some astronauts aboard the International Space Station have experienced problems with their vision and increased pressure in their brains as a result of microgravity. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) call this visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome.

To explore how microgravity affects the brain, neuroradiologists Drs. Donna R. Roberts and Michael U. Antonucci — both associate professors at Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston — and colleagues studied MRI scans of astronauts before and after both short-term and long-term space missions.

The fascinating results were published yesterday in The New England Journal of Medicine.

The study involved 18 astronauts on long-term missions to the International Space Station, lasting on average 164 days, and 16 astronauts who had been on short-term space shuttle flights averaging 13 days.

The team found that 94 percent of the astronauts on long-term missions experienced a narrowing of a groove at the top of the brain, called the central sulcus, while this only happened in 19 percent of the space shuttle travelers.

Additional data showing multiple sequential brain scans were available for a subset of the astronauts. Analysis of these revealed that the brains of all of the long-term space explorers, but not of those on short-term missions, had shifted upward in response to the microgravity conditions.

6196b_mnt_history_leaderboard Aspiring astronauts: Beware of the health risks of space travel

These are not the signs you’re looking for

Of the astronauts on long-term missions, three developed severe VIIP. But the team couldn’t pinpoint any specific changes in their brains that could explain why they had developed VIIP.

Dr. Antonucci told me, “NASA has noted that approximately 60 percent of astronauts on long-duration missions experience decreased visual acuity and [roughly] 40 percent of astronauts are classified as having VIIP.”

In this study, he added, only astronauts with severe VIIP symptoms had follow-up assessments. The lack of additional data from those with less severe symptoms, made it challenging to draw conclusions about what causes the symptoms of VIIP.

“Ideally, a full complement of information would be available for each returning astronaut to allow a more thorough comparison of imaging findings with clinical symptoms and other non-imaging testing,” Dr. Antonucci said.

“Exposure to the space environment has permanent effects on humans that we simply do not understand,” Dr. Roberts comments not the findings. “What astronauts experience in space must be mitigated to produce safer space travel for the public.”

The areas most affected during long-term space missions were those that control movement of the body and higher executive function, pretty essential to an astronaut on a space mission.

What might happen on extended missions, like NASA’s journey to Mars planned for the early 2030s, is as yet unclear.

We know these long-duration flights take a big toll on the astronauts […]; however, we don’t know if the adverse effects on the body continue to progress or if they stabilize after some time in space.”

Dr. Roberts

Well, we can only hope that our intrepid explorers’ brains will acclimatize during their extended time in space. But let’s turn out attention now to matters of the heart.

Swollen veins and puffy faces

A fully functioning ticker is essential to an astronaut’s health. The two biggest risk factors for the cardiovascular system in the extraterrestrial environment are microgravity and space radiation.

The gravity that we experience on Earth causes a pressure gradient in our cardiovascular system. Take away gravity, and the pressure is the same across the body.

Right after take-off, this means that blood rushes into the chest and head, causing swollen veins and puffy faces all around.

In microgravity, the heart doesn’t have to work as hard to pump the blood around the body. This is bad news because the system quickly becomes accommodated to what would equate to an extremely sedentary lifestyle on Earth.

Blood vessel walls thicken and become stiffer, which might predispose the astronauts to cardiovascular disease.

Radiation is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which in turn is a leading cause of death on Earth. Even quite low doses of radiation, such as 0.5 Grays (Gy or Grays are the units of absorbed radiation) are known to increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

For comparison, emergency workers involved in the cleanup after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986 were left with a higher risk for cardiovascular disease at levels as low as 0.15 Grays.

6196b_mnt_history_leaderboard Aspiring astronauts: Beware of the health risks of space travel

Radiation ‘potentially most important hazard’

Space is full of radiation, which doesn’t sit well with our ambitions of exploring distant stellar objects. But, we really don’t know enough about cosmic rays to be sure that they will have the same damaging effects as radiation back on Earth.

“Radiation is potentially the most important hazard. But this will depend very much on whether radiation effects have a threshold at low doses, say around 0.5 G[rays],” Prof. Durante told me.

Deep-space missions, like the one to Mars, would need to take the potential hazards of radiation into consideration and develop specific countermeasures, he added.

More research is needed. “Accelerator-based studies to identify cardiovascular damage at low doses are very urgent for answering this question,” Prof. Durante said.

He also told me that studying what happens to the cardiovascular system during space missions is no mean feat. “One of the main problems is that the cardiovascular system is connected to essentially all other organs, so it is not easy to make a cause-effect distinction,” he explained.

So, how will our astronauts protect themselves on their journeys into uncharted territory? Prof. Durante thinks that we are on the right track to finding out.

I am personally very optimist and we are making very fast progress. Countermeasures include physical exercise, antioxidants, nutraceuticals and, for radiation exposure, shielding.”

Prof. Durante

To infinity and beyond

Dr. Antonucci shares this sentiment. “[…] we strongly believe that [the results of our study are] the first step in making long-duration space missions safer for our astronauts and others who ultimately travel in space,” he told me.

“Now that we have demonstrated [brain changes] on MRI, we can begin to design ways of either minimizing the changes themselves or mitigating their physiological manifestation.”

He said that certain medications can counteract the symptoms of VIIP, but “whether these would work in a microgravity environment […] is uncertain.”

“[An alternative] approach might be to design a vehicle which replicates our terrestrial environment — such as a transport vehicle with artificial gravity to minimize the changes that occur in a microgravity environment,” he suggested.

Ultimately, there are so many talented people working on our space program that we are confident that our findings will facilitate extensive discussion and study to determine approaches to minimizing the changes and/or mitigating the effects of these changes on astronaut function.”

Dr. Antonucci

Before we zoom off to the stars at warp speed, there are clearly some kinks that will need to be ironed out.

With just over a decade left before a group of intrepid explorers will set to embark on the first trip to the Red Planet, I have my fingers crossed that we can address these issues and keep their brains and tickers in good enough shape to get them there and back safely.

News Brief: Health Care Deal, Travel Ban Blocked By Hawaii Judge

Senators reached a deal to stabilize the Affordable Care Act insurance markets for 2 years. President Trump’s third executive order restricting travel from some countries to the U.S. has been blocked.

Four Reasons The Apple iPhone X Is The Ultimate Travel Accessory

The iPhone X, in line with what we’ve come to expect from Apple, is at the cutting edge of smartphones today. It’s faster, sturdier and significantly more elegant than its predecessors, all without sacrificing the classic thin, light frame. Here are four reasons why the iPhone X is poised to become the top travel accessory of tomorrow, and why if you haven’t decided to get one yet, you may want to reconsider.

Seriously Impressive Cameras

If you haven’t left your DSLR behind already, the camera on the iPhone X makes a very compelling case for just that. Here’s how Apple describes the new camera on its site:

A larger and faster 12MP sensor. A new color filter. Deeper pixels. And a new telephoto camera with OIS.

Apple

Apple’s new Animoji feature, available on the iPhone X

OIS stands for Optical Image Stabilization, which is used for taking crisp shots in transit or capturing a scene in motion. It also means low-light photos are also getting a boost, a big bonus for the adventurous night owl. The front-facing camera on the iPhone X, now called the TrueDepth Camera, is 7 megapixels and offers portrait lighting as well, so selfies are only going to get better. Perhaps the most exciting addition, though, is Animoji, which uses the TrueDepth Camera to mirror your facial movements and transpose those onto an emoji. “Reveal your inner panda, pig, or robot,” Apple says. Yes, it’s silly, but I think Animoji is going to be a big, big hit.

Massive Durability Upgrade

A phone’s durability is very important when you’re traveling, but not everyone wants to invest in a clunky, heavy “life-proof” case to protect their delicate phone from the turbulent conditions of being on the road. Despite their efficacy, recent iPhones have been accused of flimsiness, so it’s nice to see that Apple has built the iPhone X with “surgical-grade stainless steel” plus an added reinforcing layer. “Bendgate” seems to be behind us.

Apple

The Apple iPhone X is dust- and water-resistant, and features surgical-grade stainless steel

The iPhone X also has the hardest glass ever put on a smartphone, though you’ll probably still want to invest in a good screen protector, given the phone’s hefty $1,000+ price tag. It’s dust- and water-resistant, though not yet waterproof, so leave it on the boat when you go snorkeling, for now.

Face ID

Biometric technology was once the stuff of sci-fi films, but after introducing fingerprint technology several years ago, Apple is raising the bar again with its brand new Face ID.

Face ID leverages the iPhone X’s dual cameras, infrared technology and real-time 3D rendering to identify you as its owner. 3D rendering, though it may sound over-the-top, is necessary to check for signs of life, preventing a well-taken photograph of you from unlocking your phone. Since infrared light is a non-visible illuminator just outside the visible spectrum of light, Face ID won’t be uncomfortable to use, nor will it be any less effective at night or outdoors.

Apple

Apple’s iPhone X comes equipped with Face ID technology

Face ID holds a lot of potential benefits for travelers, though many of these will depend on the apps that choose to employ it. I expect airlines will start using Face ID for boarding passes, hotels will begin offering staffless Face ID check-ins, and a host of other third-party planning, flight and hotel apps will jump on the bandwagon as well.

Even though Face ID protects your data if your iPhone X is lost or stolen, it’s good to have a financial backup plan for those situations as well. I recommend buying your phone with a credit card like the American Express Platinum or the N26 Black card, both of which offer comprehensive insurance protection on your purchases to ensure you’re covered if anything goes awry.

Brighter, Bolder Display

Possibly the most talked-about feature of the iPhone X is its monstrous, edge-to-edge OLED (organic light-emitting diode) display. With OLED, each pixel produces its own illumination, as opposed to something like an LCD display, which is illuminated by an LED backlight. The result: a bright, luminous display that looks good from every angle.

From a traveler’s standpoint, the new display holds a very tangible benefit: it’s better for viewing content on long-haul flights. Even when you’re flying business class, most airlines’ entertainment systems don’t hold a candle to Netflix, so pop open your iPhone X and enjoy. For the bookworms like me, the phone’s True Tone Display adjusts white balance for a more paper-like experience, which makes long bouts of reading much easier on the eyes.

Apple

The Apple iPhone X has a brighter, bolder display with true blacks and deeper colors than ever before

The iPhone X feels like the future. There’s plenty of burgeoning technology packed into this small piece of real estate, and much of it will noticeably improve the lives of travelers in the not-too-distant future. It also makes good on the less flashy items that travelers still have to be aware of, items like durability and data security. Occasionally, it does both at the same time. The iPhone X’s wireless charging capabilities, for example, mean pesky charging cables are on the way out, and it’s not difficult to imagine a future where airports are equipped with wireless charging stations around every corner.

A thoughtful and exciting new model from Apple, whether the iPhone X will truly make us think different will only become clear in time.

Sennheiser has created the perfect travel companion

2a240_Sennheiser-PXC-550-Wireless-Headphones-2 Sennheiser has created the perfect travel companion

If you travel a lot – whether by plane, train, or automobile – you will spend hours sitting in dull stillness. To get through all that time with your sanity intact, you’ll want to be able to listen to music, watch a movie, or check out the latest podcast with a high degree of audio quality. A good set of wireless headphones can provide that, but many of them just don’t have the battery life needed to last a long trip.

When you’re faced with that kind of dilemma, the folks at Sennheiser have developed a product that’s right up your alley. The Sennheiser PXC 550 Wireless Headphones is a device designed for the discerning, jetset, businessman. Not only will it give you an excellent audio experience, but its battery life will last up to 30 hours. That’s more than enough for a long road trip, train ride, or cross-country flight. Even transpacific!

The Sennheiser PXC 550 Wireless Headphones include a earcup-mounted touch control panel along with a voice prompt system. This allows you to have access to a convenient selection of settings. In addition, the headphones can automatically pause any music or calls when you remove them from your head. The headphones support quick and easy NFC pairing to your smartphone or other Bluetooth device, and the audio transmission can be adjusted to your own preferences.

The Sennheiser PXC 550 Wireless Headphones is a device designed for the discerning, jetset, businessman.

In addition to the headphones, Sennheiser also has a mobile app, CapTune, that can be used to give you even more control of your PXC 550 Wireless Headphones. The app, for Android and iOS, offers precise sound adjustments with its equalizer. It also has a feature called SoundCheck that allows you to tune your music’s sound by A/B-testing different set-ups.
The PXC 550 Wireless Headphones also supports a plug-in for the app to help access features such as adaptive noise cancellation, audio prompts, and the activation of Smart Pause. The headphones also have four presets for adjusting sound, along with a Director mode that’s control with the CapTune app.

2a240_Sennheiser-PXC-550-Wireless-Headphones-2 Sennheiser has created the perfect travel companion

For those travelers who have to make calls while globetrotting, the Sennheiser PXC 550 handles that with aplomb. It contains a beamforming array of three microphones for crystal-clear speech support. In addition, the headphones support the company’s NoiseGard noise cancellation technology, which both monitors and adapts to changes in outside sounds so that you get just the right level of noise cancellation.

Ready to stop enduring travel and start relaxing like the pros?

Of course, if you are going to wear headphones for hours, they should also be very comfortable. The Sennheiser PXC 550 Wireless Headphones fit this bill well. They are precision-designed to be extremely ergonomic and are made of premium-quality, lightweight materials. The earpads were created with the help of the company’s research into ear shape ergonomics so you won’t have to feel uncomfortable while you listen to your music for long stretches.

Finally, after the trip is over, the headphones are designed to be collapsed and folded flat so they can be easily transported and contained in their own travel case.
If this sounds like the perfect set of travel headphones for you, you can purchase the Sennheiser PXC 550 Wireless Headphones at the company’s web site, at Amazon.com, as well as at a number of Duty Free retail stores.

Ready to stop enduring travel and start relaxing like the pros? Use the buttons below to shop for the PXC 550 at your preferred retailer!

Shop on Sennheiser

Shop on Amazon

Trump health secretary to repay cost of private jet travel

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price promised on Thursday to repay the nearly $52,000 cost of his seats on private charter flights, as expensive air travel by Trump administration officials drew sharp scrutiny from Congress.

“Today, I will write a personal check to the U.S. Treasury for the expenses of my travel on private charter planes,” said Price, a former member of Congress, in a statement. “The taxpayers won’t pay a dime for my seat on those planes.”

Price was one of a handful of senior officials in President Donald Trump’s administration put on the defensive over reports about their use of charter flights and government aircraft, sometimes for personal travel, when they could have flown commercial for less money.

Price told Fox News on Thursday that Trump had spoken to him about the matter and was not happy. Asked if he retained Trump’s confidence, Price said he worked at the president’s pleasure.

Washington media outlet Politico reported that Price had taken at least two dozen private charter flights since May at a cost to U.S. taxpayers of more than $400,000.

Politico in a report on Thursday night said the White House had approved the use of military aircraft for other trips by Price to Africa, Europe and Asia in the spring and summer that cost taxpayers more than $500,000.

“Secretary Price will write a personal check to the U.S. Treasury for $51,887.31,” a spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Human Services said on Thursday.

Price is paying his individual share of the charter flight cost, an HHS official said. Price said earlier on Thursday he believed he retained Trump’s confidence.

Senior U.S. government officials travel frequently, but are generally expected to keep the costs down by taking commercial flights or the train when possible.

Price, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin were all in the spotlight for their travel habits.

Politico reported late on Thursday that Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke took a charter flight from Las Vegas to Glacier Park International Airport in Montana in June that cost $12,375. The route is served by commercial flights.

Zinke also took charter flights between St. Croix and St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands in March and used a military aircraft to travel to Norway in May, according to Politico.

“As with previous interior secretaries, the Secretary traveled on charter flights when there were no commercial options available,” Interior Department spokeswoman Heather Swift said in a statement. “All travel is pre-approved by the ethics office before booking and the charter flights went through an additional level of due diligence.”

Republican Senator Chuck Grassley urged Trump in a statement ”to emphasize to cabinet secretaries the necessity of using reasonable and cost-effective modes of travel in accordance with federal restrictions.”

PRICES EXPRESSES REGRET

In his statement, Price said his travel had been approved by legal and departmental officials. But he expressed regret over the concerns raised and pledged to take no more private charter flights while health secretary.

“I was not sensitive enough to my concern for the taxpayer,” said Price, an orthopedic surgeon. He was confirmed in February as health secretary despite questions about how he had been buying shares in publicly traded healthcare companies while working on legislation affecting them.

As a conservative Republican U.S. representative in 2009, Price chastised “the fiscal irresponsibility” of private-plane use by government officials in an appearance on CNBC television that he also posted on Twitter.

Price’s travels and those of the entire Trump Cabinet are being probed by a U.S. House of Representatives committee. Senate Democrats wrote to Price on Thursday demanding information about his flights.

The inspectors general at HHS, EPA and Treasury are investigating to see if government travel rules were followed.

The EPA’s inspector general said last month it was investigating Pruitt’s frequent travels to his home state of Oklahoma. The Washington Post reported on Thursday that Pruitt had taken at least four noncommercial and military flights since mid-February, costing taxpayers more than $58,000.

EPA spokeswoman Liz Bowman said Pruitt did use one charter flight but that other commissioned flights were done on government planes.

“The administrator flies commercial, unless there is a necessity to do otherwise, and with approvals from EPA’s ethics office,” said EPA spokesman Jahan Wilcox.

At the Treasury Department, the inspector general is reviewing Mnuchin’s use of a government plane to fly to Kentucky in August for a visit to Louisville and Fort Knox. Mnuchin and his wife viewed the solar eclipse during the trip.

On the “CBS This Morning” program on Thursday, Mnuchin said he would use military planes in the future only when there are national security issues or “there’s no other means” of travel.

Additional reporting by Valerie Volcovici and Eric Beech; Editing by Kevin Drawbaugh and Peter Cooney

Trump unhappy with top health official over travel

President Donald Trump declared Wednesday that he’s “not happy” with his top health official, putting Tom Price’s job in jeopardy after his costly charter flights triggered a congressional investigation of administration travel.

Asked whether he’s planning on firing Price, Trump responded: “We’ll see.”

A former GOP congressman from Georgia, Price played a supporting role in the fruitless Republican effort to repeal Barack Obama’s health care law, which has been another source of frustration for the president. Price is known as a conservative policy expert, but his penchant for taking private charter aircraft on the taxpayer’s dime is creating new headaches for the White House.

Late in the day, Price’s office said he’s heard the criticism and has taken it to heart. There was no indication he’d be stepping down.

Prompted partly by controversy over Price, the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Wednesday sent requests for detailed travel records to the White House and 24 departments and agencies, dating back to Trump’s first day in office.

The letters were signed by the committee’s chairman, Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., and its ranking Democrat, Elijah Cummings of Maryland. Lawmakers are demanding information on political appointees’ use of government planes for personal travel, as well as their use of private charters for official travel. The committee wants details by Oct. 10.

The president vented his displeasure with Price to reporters as he left the White House for a trip to sell his tax overhaul in Indianapolis.

“I was looking into it, and I will look into it, and I will tell you personally I’m not happy about it,” Trump responded when asked about Price’s travel. “I am not happy about it. I’m going to look at it. I’m not happy about it and I let him know it.”

Trump’s comments seemed to take the health secretary’s office by surprise. For hours there was no response from the Health and Human Services Department, but Wednesday evening a spokeswoman released a statement.

“As the secretary said over the weekend, he’s heard the criticism and the concerns,” said spokeswoman Caitlin Oakley. “He takes that very seriously and has taken it to heart.” Previously Price’s office had said it’s cooperating with a review by the HHS inspector general, and he will stop flying on charters until that investigation is complete.

Price’s travels were first reported last week by Politico, which said it had identified 26 charter flights at a cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars. Cheaper commercial flights were a viable option in many cases.

On a June trip to Nashville, Price also had lunch with his son, who lives in that city, according to Politico. Another trip was from Dulles International Airport in the Washington suburbs to Philadelphia International Airport, a distance of 135 miles.

The HHS inspector general’s office is looking to see if Price complied with federal travel regulations, which generally require officials to minimize costs.

Price’s office said the secretary’s demanding schedule sometimes does not permit the use of commercial airline flights.

Trump’s publicly expressed displeasure — or ambivalence — has been a sign in the past that the tenure of a key aide will soon be over.

Back in August, the president was asked if he still had confidence in Steve Bannon, then a senior strategist in the White House. “He’s a good person. He actually gets very unfair press in that regard. But we’ll see what happens with Mr. Bannon,” Trump said. Bannon was out three days later.

Price, an ally of House Speaker Paul Ryan, is a past chairman of the House Budget Committee, where he was known as a frequent critic of wasteful spending. As HHS secretary, he has questioned whether the Medicaid health insurance program for low-income people delivers results that are worth the billions of dollars taxpayers spend for the coverage. He’s a former orthopedic surgeon who once practiced in an inner city hospital.

A group of Democratic lawmakers on Wednesday called for Price’s resignation. Reps. Ruben Gallego of Arizona, Ted Lieu of California, Brenda Lawrence of Michigan, Jamie Raskin of Maryland and Pramila Jayapal of Washington said in a letter that Price breached the public’s trust.

Republicans, however, largely remained mum. GOP lawmakers know Price as a colleague and regard him as a serious student of policy who can instill conservative priorities in the vast bureaucratic apparatus of HHS.

Other members of the Cabinet contacted by The Associated Press last week said they personally foot the bill for chartered travel or reimburse taxpayers the difference between commercial and chartered travel. The exceptions are when they are traveling with the president or vice president, who fly aboard government planes.

Trump ‘not happy’ with US health chief Price over private travel

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday he was “not happy” with Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price amid reports he used expensive private charter jets to travel for government business rather than cheaper commercial flights.

Asked if he would fire Price, Trump told reporters: “We’ll see.”

The House of Representatives Oversight and Government Reform Committee opened an investigation on Wednesday into travel by top officials. The panel wrote to the White House and 24 federal agencies requesting information about senior officials’ aircraft use.

Asked if he had confidence in Price after the reports on his travel, Trump said: “I am looking at that very closely. I am not happy with it. I will tell you I am not happy with it.”

Price has taken at least two dozen private charter flights since May at a cost to taxpayers of about $300,000, according to Politico, which first reported the travel.

There was no immediate comment from HHS.

On Friday, the HHS inspector general said it “is conducting a review of Secretary Price’s government travel using chartered aircraft. The review focuses on whether the travel complied with Federal Travel Regulations, but may encompass other issues related to the travel,” said Tesia Williams, a spokeswoman.

As a U.S. lawmaker in 2009, Price chastised “the fiscal irresponsibility” of private plane use by government officials in an appearance on CNBC television that he also posted on Twitter.

Another top official, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, is facing scrutiny over his use of a government plane to fly to Kentucky for a visit to Louisville and Fort Knox in Kentucky.

Mnuchin and his wife viewed the solar eclipse during the trip.

The House committee’s announcement followed calls for a probe by its top Democrat, Representative Elijah Cummings. He wrote to Price last week requesting documents related to Price’s flights.

“The amount of taxpayer funds you reportedly spent on just one single flight earlier this month is more than some of my constituents make in an entire year,” Cummings wrote to Price.

Republican Senator Ron Johnson, who chairs the Homeland Security Committee, said: “I know the HHS inspector general is looking at this and I’ll wait for the report before I comment further.”

Asked if action should be taken against Price, Republican Senator Johnny Isakson, the senior senator from Price’s home state of Georgia, said: “I think that’s the president’s prerogative for any member of the Cabinet.”

Additional reporting by Susan Heavey and Eric Walsh; Editing by Jeffrey Benkoe and Peter Cooney