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Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY

Petra Cortright makes paintings without ever touching a paintbrush, at least not in the way that painters have done for centuries.

Her brushes are digital and her easel is a computer screen. You can see what that looks like in Petra Cortright: “kinder surprise” sharky baba, her solo show at COUNTY gallery in Palm Beach.

Puzzled by the title? More on that later.

Cortright’s 21st century method might sound a lot easier than working with traditional painters’ tools. But guess again.


+
3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor

3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor


The titles for Petra Cortright’s digital paintings, such as PCMUSIC downdloads free headset review, come from her collection of spam texts. … read more

“There’s a myth that because it’s digital it’s easy to make a million of these things,” Cortright said from her home in Altadena, Calif. “People think I just punch a button and it comes out. It’s a meticulous process to make the physical work.”

Cortright harvests images from the internet, loads them into Photoshop, manipulates them and carves them up. She combines the appropriated imagery with brush strokes using digital paintbrushes.

Each series of paintings uses elements from a single “mother file” from which she constructs variations by building up hundreds of layers in meticulous order. She works with a highly skilled printer to turn her virtual paintings into one-of-a-kind physical objects printed on aluminum, linen or paper.

“Petra has a lot of buzz now,” said Dalton Freed, the gallery’s director. “She’s a really hot artist.”

She’s what Freed calls a “post-internet artist,” meaning an artist who uses the web to make art about the Internet.

Critics have compared Cortright’s digital paintings to those of Monet and the abstract expressionists. Major museums, such as the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, are starting to collect her work. She’s created six quirky video projects showcasing fashions by Stella McCartney, daughter of Paul McCartney.

The seven paintings at COUNTY, all created this year, are derived from two mother files.


+
3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor

3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor


Petra Cortright constructs digital paintings such as Vertigogo. Her work is on view in Petra Cortright: “kinder surprise” sharky baba at … read more

One set consists of sprawling horizontal pieces, measuring as big as 4 feet high and 7 feet 10 inches wide. The compositions often suggest seascapes. Backgrounds resemble gray honeycombs or coral.

The imagery on top roils. Squiggling brush stroke dance with hefty geometric shapes and fragments of identifiable imagery, such as a chair, a flowering tree pattern and a lipstick applicator. Colors set up a unifying rhythm, holding the paintings together with smears and slabs of red, yellow, aqua and black.

A second set of smaller vertical works is more fanciful. It’s dominated by showers of flowers and slender lines that resemble Japanese ink paintings floating on layered backdrops that create illusionary depth.

When she’s creating her compositions “I work very quickly at an intuitive and instinctual level,” she said. “I go with what’s working.”

As for the titles, they come from her collection of spam texts and have nothing to do with the art.

There’s a definite playful streak to Cortright’s creativity. She’s not trying to hit viewers over the head with a message.

“If people want to give my work some social or political meaning, I’m open to that,” she said. “I’m interested in making work that’s approachable to people.”

Why digital? It’s fast, gives her great control over her work, offers endless resources and is easily stored for re-use. She likes to break up old paintings to use in new work.

Also, she’s 31 and never knew a time when the internet didn’t exist.


+
3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor

3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor


Petra Cortright’s Ways to control deluxe aphids, a digital painting on linen, is 47 inches high and 92 inches wide. It’s … read more



If You Go

What: Petra Cortright: “kinder surprise” sharky baba

When: Through Jan. 14

Where: COUNTY, 350 S. County Road

For information: Call (305) 713-7588 or visit county.gallery

Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY

Petra Cortright makes paintings without ever touching a paintbrush, at least not in the way that painters have done for centuries.

Her brushes are digital and her easel is a computer screen. You can see what that looks like in Petra Cortright: “kinder surprise” sharky baba, her solo show at COUNTY gallery in Palm Beach.

Puzzled by the title? More on that later.

Cortright’s 21st century method might sound a lot easier than working with traditional painters’ tools. But guess again.


+
3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor

3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor


The titles for Petra Cortright’s digital paintings, such as PCMUSIC downdloads free headset review, come from her collection of spam texts. … read more

“There’s a myth that because it’s digital it’s easy to make a million of these things,” Cortright said from her home in Altadena, Calif. “People think I just punch a button and it comes out. It’s a meticulous process to make the physical work.”

Cortright harvests images from the internet, loads them into Photoshop, manipulates them and carves them up. She combines the appropriated imagery with brush strokes using digital paintbrushes.

Each series of paintings uses elements from a single “mother file” from which she constructs variations by building up hundreds of layers in meticulous order. She works with a highly skilled printer to turn her virtual paintings into one-of-a-kind physical objects printed on aluminum, linen or paper.

“Petra has a lot of buzz now,” said Dalton Freed, the gallery’s director. “She’s a really hot artist.”

She’s what Freed calls a “post-internet artist,” meaning an artist who uses the web to make art about the Internet.

Critics have compared Cortright’s digital paintings to those of Monet and the abstract expressionists. Major museums, such as the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, are starting to collect her work. She’s created six quirky video projects showcasing fashions by Stella McCartney, daughter of Paul McCartney.

The seven paintings at COUNTY, all created this year, are derived from two mother files.


+
3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor

3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor


Petra Cortright constructs digital paintings such as Vertigogo. Her work is on view in Petra Cortright: “kinder surprise” sharky baba at … read more

One set consists of sprawling horizontal pieces, measuring as big as 4 feet high and 7 feet 10 inches wide. The compositions often suggest seascapes. Backgrounds resemble gray honeycombs or coral.

The imagery on top roils. Squiggling brush stroke dance with hefty geometric shapes and fragments of identifiable imagery, such as a chair, a flowering tree pattern and a lipstick applicator. Colors set up a unifying rhythm, holding the paintings together with smears and slabs of red, yellow, aqua and black.

A second set of smaller vertical works is more fanciful. It’s dominated by showers of flowers and slender lines that resemble Japanese ink paintings floating on layered backdrops that create illusionary depth.

When she’s creating her compositions “I work very quickly at an intuitive and instinctual level,” she said. “I go with what’s working.”

As for the titles, they come from her collection of spam texts and have nothing to do with the art.

There’s a definite playful streak to Cortright’s creativity. She’s not trying to hit viewers over the head with a message.

“If people want to give my work some social or political meaning, I’m open to that,” she said. “I’m interested in making work that’s approachable to people.”

Why digital? It’s fast, gives her great control over her work, offers endless resources and is easily stored for re-use. She likes to break up old paintings to use in new work.

Also, she’s 31 and never knew a time when the internet didn’t exist.


+
3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor

3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor


Petra Cortright’s Ways to control deluxe aphids, a digital painting on linen, is 47 inches high and 92 inches wide. It’s … read more



If You Go

What: Petra Cortright: “kinder surprise” sharky baba

When: Through Jan. 14

Where: COUNTY, 350 S. County Road

For information: Call (305) 713-7588 or visit county.gallery

Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY

Petra Cortright makes paintings without ever touching a paintbrush, at least not in the way that painters have done for centuries.

Her brushes are digital and her easel is a computer screen. You can see what that looks like in Petra Cortright: “kinder surprise” sharky baba, her solo show at COUNTY gallery in Palm Beach.

Puzzled by the title? More on that later.

Cortright’s 21st century method might sound a lot easier than working with traditional painters’ tools. But guess again.


+
3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor

3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor


The titles for Petra Cortright’s digital paintings, such as PCMUSIC downdloads free headset review, come from her collection of spam texts. … read more

“There’s a myth that because it’s digital it’s easy to make a million of these things,” Cortright said from her home in Altadena, Calif. “People think I just punch a button and it comes out. It’s a meticulous process to make the physical work.”

Cortright harvests images from the internet, loads them into Photoshop, manipulates them and carves them up. She combines the appropriated imagery with brush strokes using digital paintbrushes.

Each series of paintings uses elements from a single “mother file” from which she constructs variations by building up hundreds of layers in meticulous order. She works with a highly skilled printer to turn her virtual paintings into one-of-a-kind physical objects printed on aluminum, linen or paper.

“Petra has a lot of buzz now,” said Dalton Freed, the gallery’s director. “She’s a really hot artist.”

She’s what Freed calls a “post-internet artist,” meaning an artist who uses the web to make art about the Internet.

Critics have compared Cortright’s digital paintings to those of Monet and the abstract expressionists. Major museums, such as the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, are starting to collect her work. She’s created six quirky video projects showcasing fashions by Stella McCartney, daughter of Paul McCartney.

The seven paintings at COUNTY, all created this year, are derived from two mother files.


+
3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor

3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor


Petra Cortright constructs digital paintings such as Vertigogo. Her work is on view in Petra Cortright: “kinder surprise” sharky baba at … read more

One set consists of sprawling horizontal pieces, measuring as big as 4 feet high and 7 feet 10 inches wide. The compositions often suggest seascapes. Backgrounds resemble gray honeycombs or coral.

The imagery on top roils. Squiggling brush stroke dance with hefty geometric shapes and fragments of identifiable imagery, such as a chair, a flowering tree pattern and a lipstick applicator. Colors set up a unifying rhythm, holding the paintings together with smears and slabs of red, yellow, aqua and black.

A second set of smaller vertical works is more fanciful. It’s dominated by showers of flowers and slender lines that resemble Japanese ink paintings floating on layered backdrops that create illusionary depth.

When she’s creating her compositions “I work very quickly at an intuitive and instinctual level,” she said. “I go with what’s working.”

As for the titles, they come from her collection of spam texts and have nothing to do with the art.

There’s a definite playful streak to Cortright’s creativity. She’s not trying to hit viewers over the head with a message.

“If people want to give my work some social or political meaning, I’m open to that,” she said. “I’m interested in making work that’s approachable to people.”

Why digital? It’s fast, gives her great control over her work, offers endless resources and is easily stored for re-use. She likes to break up old paintings to use in new work.

Also, she’s 31 and never knew a time when the internet didn’t exist.


+
3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor

3c10f_newsEngin.20724001_cortright3 Post-internet artist Petra Cortright shows her work at COUNTY
Daily News Arts Editor


Petra Cortright’s Ways to control deluxe aphids, a digital painting on linen, is 47 inches high and 92 inches wide. It’s … read more



If You Go

What: Petra Cortright: “kinder surprise” sharky baba

When: Through Jan. 14

Where: COUNTY, 350 S. County Road

For information: Call (305) 713-7588 or visit county.gallery

Lenovo’s ARM Windows 10 PC shows up on bechmarks

by Surur

 

University of Missouri Health Care shows why IT is an innovation hub, not a cost center

The University of Missouri Health Care has a unique way of handling technology. Its private-public partnership with Cerner created the Tiger Institute for Health Innovation in 2009, designed to address health concerns in the area and connect providers with each other to improve care quality and costs.

MU Health CIO Bryan Bliven said that mission is at the core of the organization: “It’s an intentional culture, the culture of yes.”

“Together we deliver care and serve the community,” Bliven said. “Everyone in the organization wants to deliver on that, first and foremost.”

The focus on innovation gives the IT department more freedom to be creative in its work, as IT isn’t seen as just a “cost center to be controlled and managed, it’s more of an innovation center,” he said. ” What can we do through technology to improve the lives and health of Missourians?”

That attitude and the hospital’s partnership with Cerner has yielded a long list of accolades, notably the CHIME Transformational Leadership Award in 2016.

Bliven highlighted the work MU Health does to ensure all employees are in tune with the hospital’s mission to serve the rural part of the state through education, research and exceptional care.

Indeed, it’s that culture within the organization that enables employees to leverage the latest technology to make a big difference in the community.

“It’s not just install and maintain technology. We use technology to have better quality care,” Bliven said. “That’s what people get excited about.”

Technology is tied into the entire organization. For example, the team considers its data footprint and how that can maximize value inside and outside the IT shop.

“We’ve been working on tying our IT goals into the organization’s goals moving forward,” Bliven said. “We weave our strategy into the entire organization. We’ll create a three-year plan to march out against and tie into the service lines the organization deems strategic.”

Right now, consumer engagement is top of mind, as well as revenue cycle, Bliven added, noting that a new Cerner revenue cycle platform will go live in 2019. 

The health system has also been working on improving readmissions. Bliven said that it identified the ideal goal for the project and leveraged process analytics to find gaps. Bliven’s team created a plan based on that data and reduced readmissions by 40 percent.

MU is also using analytics to improve physician documentation and reduce time spent in workflows, while using data to inform staffing needs. And the hospital offers its tech as a service to local physician practices or regional hospitals that may not be able to manage IT on their own.

But through all projects, communication is key, he said. For example, MU Health is going through a move as it’s running out of space. So it made sure its staff understood why the move was taking place.

“You have to have those tough conversations,” Bliven said. “Once they know the way you want things done, let them own it. Empower your leaders to take ownership, to be part of the mission so they’re engaged.”

Best hospital IT departments: 2017

Meet the winners and find out their winning formula.

Click here to learn more about how we chose this year’s winners.

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com

University of Illinois Health shows how C-suite, IT team alignment actually makes change happen

Many hospitals are beginning to realize that one key to successful IT deployments and security posture is to partner with leadership to get all departments on the same page.

For the University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System, this became very clear as it began to plan for its transition to an Epic electronic health record platform. UI Health considered the EHR replacement both tactical and strategic, according to CIO Audrius Polikaitis. 

“We’re positioning it as a redesign of workflows, with IT being an enabler. IT is important in rolling it out and supporting it,” Polikaitis added. “We might have some challenges with change management but if leadership owns it, it might go smoother.”

The Epic project is predicted to go live in 18 to 24 months. UI Health is replacing all clinical and revenue cycle platforms. Currently, it uses Cerner for its inpatient and ambulatory systems, while billing is on Epic. Polikaitis calls the project a “wholesale replacement.”

UI Health prides itself on being what Polikaitis called a “slack organization,” with directors and C-suite leaders mingling together with staff. Leaders have a presence within an organization and are approachable to its employees, he said – in fact, the executive level offices are right on the first floor.

The health system also recently completely redesigned its management processes, starting with its workflow. Further, UI Health has made serious investments in its leadership team. Every manager must go through a nine-month leadership program.

“Fundamentally, it’s the notion: How do people get into leadership positions? Technically, it’s because they’re the best at their job,” Polikaitis said. “But we’re realizing: We don’t prepare people for the leadership role … It’s the notion of investment into people and leaders, so we saw as an organization how we can improve.”

The result? Managers understand their roles as leaders, rather than doers, he said. And it changes how employees view leadership within the organization and will engage more with those managers.

To Polikaitis, this also means partnerships in planning for future IT projects. Once the Epic project gets underway, UI Health will work on transitioning its imaging systems from slides to digital. It also plans to further leverage analytics, bringing data more closely into clinical workflows.

UI Health has been building dashboards and Big Data platforms for the past eight months, along with working with stakeholders to develop the right representation of data, he explained. Now, providers carry around iPads with these dashboards using analytics for real-time action.

“It’s the notion of very real-time, very numeric data,” Polikaitis said. “It was a massive, massive initiative.”

Best hospital IT departments: 2017

Meet the winners and find out their winning formula.

Click here to learn more about how we chose this year’s winners.

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com

Fracking harms the health of babies, study shows

This story was originally published by Mother Jones and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

The practice of drilling into the ground to release natural gas — known as hydraulic fracturing or fracking — first made national headlines in 2011 when drinking water taps in fracking towns in Pennsylvania began catching fire because flammable methane was seeping into water supplies.

Since then, fracking has been linked to earthquakes in Oklahoma and a myriad of health issues. Proponents of fracking say the practice has reduced energy costs and has created thousands of jobs. But environmental groups, such as the Natural Resources Defense Council, say that for people living near sites, fracking can have severe health affects such as respiratory illnesses and cancer.

A new study from the journal Science Advances found that infants born to women living near fracking sites in Pennsylvania were especially vulnerable to adverse health outcomes. “As local and state policymakers decide whether to allow hydraulic fracturing in their communities, it is crucial that they carefully examine the costs and benefits,” said Michael Greenstone, a coauthor of the study and the director of the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago, in a press release. “This study provides the strongest large-scale evidence of a link between the pollution that stems from hydraulic fracturing activities and … the health of babies.”

The researchers analyzed vital statistics of more than 1.1 million births in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2013. They studied infants born to women living 1 kilometer (or slightly over half a mile) away from fracking sites, as well as women living within 3 kilometers (or less than 2 miles), and women living between 3 to 15 kilometers (or less than 2 miles to 9 miles) away.

They found that fracking reduces the health of infants born to mothers living within 3 kilometers from a fracking site. But for mothers living within 1 kilometer, the affects were acute. The probability of low infant birth weight, meaning the infant weighs less than 5.5 pounds, increased to 25 percent.

Studies show that low birth weight can lead to infant mortality, asthma, lower test scores while school-age, and lower earnings as adults. The study also found that mothers whose babies may have been exposed to nearby fracking sites tend to be younger, less educated, and less likely to be married — factors that can also lead to poor infant health.

But there are significant differences between the mothers who give birth close to fracking sites and those who don’t. Black mothers included in the study were more likely to live nearest to fracking sites, exposing their infants to higher risks of pollution. “This difference arises because over time, more wells were drilled near urban areas such as Pittsburgh, where higher numbers of African Americans live,” the authors wrote. Allegheny County, where Pittsburgh is located, has 63 active fracking wells. Many other fracking sites are located in lower-income communities.

Nationwide, between July 2012 and June 2013, as many as 65,000 infants were exposed to pollution from fracking, because their mothers lived within 1 kilometer of a fracking site.

“Given the growing evidence that pollution affects babies in utero,” said coauthor Janet Currie, who is a economics and public affairs professor at Princeton University, “it should not be surprising that fracking has negative effects on infants.”

Speedtest shows global internet speeds are up this past year

f52b1_Screen%2BShot%2B2017-12-14%2Bat%2B11.13.39%2BAM Speedtest shows global internet speeds are up this past year

According to Speedtest, mobile download speeds have increased 30.1 percent over the past 12 months, while mobile upload speed increased 38.9 percent. The tool also shows a 31.6 percent speed increase for fixed broadband downloads (along with a 25.9 percent increase for broadband upload speeds). In November, Speedtest notes that 119 countries have a faster mobile download speed than the global average of 20.28 Mbps, while 134 countries are slower. Broadband had 71 countries above that global average, with 185 countries coming in slower than that.

f52b1_Screen%2BShot%2B2017-12-14%2Bat%2B11.13.39%2BAM Speedtest shows global internet speeds are up this past year

The countries showing the greatest mobile speed increase over the last year include Laos (the most improved with a 249.5 percent increase), Vietnam, Trinidad/Tobago, Hong Kong and Lebanon. Most improved for fixed broadband includes the tiny French island off the coast of Africa, Reunion, Guatemala, Ghana, Peru and India. On the other side of the coin, many countries lost speed, notably Puerto Rico saw a drop of 39.8 percent in mobile download speeds, most likely due to the hurricane.

Google Maps Go shows up on the Play Store for Go phones, but you can give it a try anyway

Android Go, the lightweight edition of Android made for low-end hardware, officially launched about a week ago, and promised to come with several optimized versions of apps to make better use of the limited resources. We’ve already seen Files Go and Google Go but the Android Go site says there are more apps, like Assistant, Gmail, and Maps. The latter has just showed up on the Play Store, though it may have been available for a while but invisible.

If you try to download Maps Go, you’ll likely see that all your phones and tablets aren’t compatible. Even Artem couldn’t find one device compatible in his humongous list, and Cody said it didn’t show up for his Nexus 4, which is the oldest phone he has in his arsenal. However, Maps Go appears to be not more than an icon leading to a Progressive Web App. And we found it in the PWA directory.

So to give it a try, all you have to do is head to this URL on your phone (beware, your phone may redirect it to open in your existing Maps app, so copy the address and paste it in a new Chrome tab). The same app as the one shown in the Play Store will launch, but it’s a PWA. You can add it to your homescreen through the overflow menu, and just like Twitter Lite for example, it will take on the Maps Go icon. Here are a few screenshots of it running on my Nokia 8:

Previous

Next

As you can see, the PWA can detect your location, give you directions for cars and public transit and walking, search for places, show different layers, share your locations, and more. It also supports more than 70 countries. It’s like a mini Google Maps that can be very useful if your device can’t handle the full-blown Maps running on it.

If you’d still like to give the official Play Store listing a look and see if the app is mysteriously available to your device, you can find it in the widget below.

b5486_ai-a24fe4de015b5938d963520193360f1c Google Maps Go shows up on the Play Store for Go phones, but you can give it a try anyway

  • Thanks:
  • Franz

This chart shows iPhone X adoption has overtaken the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus

  • Apple stopped releasing first weekend iPhone sales figures with the iPhone 7, making it hard to tell how the iPhone X, iPhone 8, and iPhone 8 Plus are selling.
  • New analytics data suggests the iPhone X is outpacing the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus in adoption.
  • The iPhone X costs $999/£999, while the iPhone 8 starts at $699/£699, and the iPhone 8 Plus starts at $799/799.

Apple hasn’t released sales figures for the iPhone X, iPhone 8, or the iPhone 8 Plus, but a new chart shows the most expensive of the three is also the most popular.

Data from analytics firm Mixpanel shows that iPhone X adoption outpaced that of its cheaper cousins in late November. iPhone X adoption currently stands at 4.76%, ahead of the iPhone 8 Plus at 3.59% and the iPhone 8 at 2.78%.

Here’s a chart comparing the three new Apple devices:

7fc97_1651b4a9aace3167795a1b6fe09b08b0f34d7296-800x414 This chart shows iPhone X adoption has overtaken the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus

And here’s a chart showing how all three phones compare to older iPhone models – it shows most people have phones that are older than the iPhone 7:

7fc97_1651b4a9aace3167795a1b6fe09b08b0f34d7296-800x414 This chart shows iPhone X adoption has overtaken the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus

Mixpanel’s data doesn’t show sales figures, but measures people picking up the new iPhones and using apps that are integrated with Mixpanel’s software development kit.

It’s still hard to tell how well the three new devices are selling compared to previous launches. Apple stopped announcing first weekend sales figures with the iPhone 7, because it said the number usually reflected supply rather than customer demand. Apple chief executive Tim Cook ducked iPhone X sales questions during the firm’s third quarter call, when analysts asked about pre-orders for the device, saying only that demand was “very strong.”

Collectively, it looks like the three devices are selling well and on track to overtake iPhone 7 Plus adoption over the next few months. But early rumours of iPhone X supply constraints may be putting people off buying in these early months, even if Apple is reportedly ramping up production in time for Christmas.

Whiteboard is in preview on Windows 10 and shows promise for …

e47d6_Whiteboard-hero_0 Whiteboard is in preview on Windows 10 and shows promise for ...

Microsoft’s Whiteboard app was released in preview last week and it shows a lot of promise for online collaboration.

Microsoft has added the ability to collaborate in real time over the internet to a number of their apps and services. Last week, Microsoft released Whiteboard in preview which allows users to ink on a digital whiteboard with multiple users from different devices. We took a hands-on look of the app earlier this year before it was available to the public and now have some more thoughts after using it some more in its public preview release.

Since the app is in preview it wouldn’t be fair to do a complete review, but here’s what stands out and what we hope to see in the future. The app is free but to use multi-party collaboration at least one person needs to have an Office 365 personal, work, or school account.

See in Microsoft Store

A natural evolution

e47d6_Whiteboard-hero_0 Whiteboard is in preview on Windows 10 and shows promise for ...

The concept of Whiteboard just works. Sure, there are some performance hiccups but the app is in preview so that isn’t an issue. Being able to draw on a virtual whiteboard and have others join in with very little delay seems like something that should have been a key feature on tablets years ago.

Whiteboard supports multiple ink colors, tools that help you draw shapes and charts, and the ability to type notes. These options make it easy to work together on math problems or any type of handwritten work or just play tic-tac-toe with a friend. Whiteboard will fit in very well in classrooms, workplaces, and could even be used for games and doodling with friends.

The app also lets you insert photos and galleries which help it be more versatile. Whiteboard combines the standard inking tools from many other Microsoft apps such as OneNote and brings in real-time collaboration. Eventually, it might even work as a baked-in part of other Microsoft apps.

A wish list

e47d6_Whiteboard-hero_0 Whiteboard is in preview on Windows 10 and shows promise for ...

Whiteboard already has a good set of features in its preview form. Over time it’s certain to grab some more. There are a few specific features we’d love to see added in the future as the app comes out of preview and is developed over time. First up is releasing the app on other platforms. Whiteboard feels handmade for tablets and the reality is that while tablets powered by Windows 10 are popular, the iPad is still a major player in the tablet space. Being able to collaborate in real time using a Surface Pro, an iPad, and a Surface Hub would be a very attractive option for schools and businesses using a number of devices. Microsoft has a plethora of apps on iOS and Android so it’s certainly a possibility that Whiteboard will come as well.

Another feature that would help would be some orientation markers. When drawing on my device and sharing it with my friend, it opened to a different part of the same digital whiteboard. This could be a bug of being in preview but even if it that’s the case, having some markers to make sure you can find an area on the page would be nice. A potential solution would be the option to have the whiteboard be marked with rows and columns. For example, you could tell your coworker to jump to C7 on the grid.

Summary

e47d6_Whiteboard-hero_0 Whiteboard is in preview on Windows 10 and shows promise for ...

Whiteboard feels very natural and makes working with other people easier. It supports some nice inking features and the delay between you writing on your device and a friend seeing it is very low.

It’s a very promising preview and it’ll be exciting to see what Microsoft does with it in the future.

See in Microsoft Store

High electric or internet bills? Let Joe Know shows you how to investigate

Did you have a couple of crazy electricity bills this summer?

Are you paying more for the internet than you thought you would?

What are the first steps you need to take to resolve the issues?

I took those questions to APS, SRP and CenturyLink recently.

Beth McFall with APS says if you have a bill issue, start with their online energy analyzer.

She says it allows you to see spikes day by day.

Maybe it was a very hot weekend.

Or maybe there’s no explanation and it needs further investigation.

At SRP, Artie Whiting says while there’s usually a different reason, you can test the meter for accuracy.

It basically means turning off electricity.

That should stop the meter from moving.

Then turn on an appliance and if the meter is moving, there could be an issue SRP needs to know about.

When it comes to the internet, maybe it’s a billing issue.

Do you think you were promised one deal, but are paying more?

I usually use the online chat feature with any business.

That allows me to take screen shots of promises made for proof later.

Dan Cook with Century Link says it is important if you have an issue, to also have as much proof as possible backing up what you tell them.

Cook says it’s great to keep notes of who you spoke to and the date because those phone call records can be examined.

All the businesses say if you have any issues, contact their customer service departments.

 

The reaction to “Cat Person” shows how the internet can even ruin fiction

ff348_vnmts40ekopeld4stv3n The reaction to “Cat Person” shows how the internet can even ruin fiction
Photo:SSPL/Getty Images

For reasons that people are now trying to determine, this weekend the internet turned its collective gaze to a short story called “Cat Person.” Published in the December 11 issue of The New Yorker, and now the publication’s most-read short story of the year, “Cat Person” by Kristen Roupenian follows the short relationship between a 20-year-old college student named Margot and a 34-year-old man named Robert. Told in close third-person from Margot’s perspective, the story deals with how emotions can be conveyed and hidden and misinterpreted, especially through texting. The story hinges on an awkward date that ends in the central pair having consensual sex, despite Margot having been turned off along the way. Later, when she ends things between the two of them—over text, of course—Robert reacts poorly.

Response to the story has varied from praise for its relatability to flat dismissal to jokes about how everyone is talking about a—Who’da thunk it?short story of all things, with much of the conversation focusing on who is the more sympathetic character between Margot and Robert. On Sunday, someone created a “Men React To Cat Person” Twitter account, compiling screenshots of responses to the story, wherein some men express confusion over its merits, others defend Robert as the story’s victim, and one wonders if the story should exist at all, stating that the events depicted don’t just happen to women:

It’s the same kind of thinking that, after hearing a real-life story of a woman being catcalled or harassed or worse, prompts some to declare, “Not all men.” As though that’s what a woman were trying to prove—that all men are horrible—when she shares such an account. She is instead saying, “This happened, because this kind of thing happens.” So it goes with this story: This is but one depiction of one instance in which one fictional man and one fictional woman fail to relate to or understand each other, a depiction that nevertheless aligns with very real contemporary gender dynamics.

Debating over who’s the bigger jerk in this, or any, work of fiction misses the point. Neither character is perfect, and what drives Roupenian’s story is how their flaws rub up against each other. Robert lets his insecurities overtake him, and Margot, who, again, is only 20 years old, cannot yet vocalize what she wants or needs, having come of age in a society that expects women to perform a great deal of emotional work to protect others’, especially men’s, feelings. “Cat Person” illustrates how such a gendered scenario might play out, but again, it must be said, in this one very specific imagined situation.

And yet because so many people came to the story through social media, as opposed to having the print issue delivered to their mail boxes, they clicked through and read without seeing its “fiction” designation. This no doubt encouraged some people to read the story not only as nonfiction but also as something that was up for debate, something they should or should not agree with. “Ours is an age where the reductive aesthetics of the broadsheet prevail, so it’s inevitable that some readers view ‘Cat Person’ as weighing in on a timely issue and offering up lessons, the way personal essays are so often inclined to do,” Laura Miller writes in a piece for Slate. This has, for better or worse, become the way we read nearly everything on the internet, as texts that must engage with a predominant conversation, then be fought over and nitpicked ad nauseum, as though each article, tweet, or Facebook post might somehow be the last word on a subject.

But even those who knew the story was fiction might be forgiven for treating “Cat Person” like an essay. Subverting the old maxim of show don’t tell, the story explains itself as it goes along, in a way that can make it feel overly determined and like the author is indeed trying to argue something. Consider this sentence, which comes during the pair’s date after Margot is refused entry into a bar and Robert kisses her: “With the drinks in front of him and the kiss behind him, and also maybe because she had cried, Robert became much more relaxed, more like the witty person she knew through his texts.” Not to Gordon Lish this thing, but what if everything but “Robert became much more relaxed” were deleted? Presenting the characters’ actions without the attendant interpretation would have required readers to come to their own conclusions about what those actions mean. The prose’s “when this happened, it made Margot feel this” one-two rhythm conjures the kind of confessions one finds in personal essays. Claire Fallon goes further in a piece for HuffPost, saying, “Roupenian’s story is the fiction version of ‘It Happened To Me: I Had Bad Sex Because It Felt Awkward To Say No.’” Snark aside, Fallon is onto something. “Cat Person” feels familiar, just not as a short story.

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Both the prose style and the social media context in which many people arrived at the story may help explain why “Cat Person” was treated as both an essay and as an argument about how men and women relate to one another. But “Cat Person” is not an argument. No short story is. And if it were an argument for anything, it would be an argument only for itself, for its existence as a work of art—which, in this case, is both reinforced and diluted with each click, opinion, and share.

Whiteboard is in preview on Windows 10 and shows promise for collaboration

1c04a_Whiteboard-hero_0 Whiteboard is in preview on Windows 10 and shows promise for collaboration

Microsoft’s Whiteboard app was released in preview last week and it shows a lot of promise for online collaboration.

Microsoft has added the ability to collaborate in real time over the internet to a number of their apps and services. Last week, Microsoft released Whiteboard in preview which allows users to ink on a digital whiteboard with multiple users from different devices. We took a hands-on look of the app earlier this year before it was available to the public and now have some more thoughts after using it some more in its public preview release.

Since the app is in preview it wouldn’t be fair to do a complete review, but here’s what stands out and what we hope to see in the future. The app is free but to use multi-party collaboration at least one person needs to have an Office 365 personal, work, or school account.

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A natural evolution

1c04a_Whiteboard-hero_0 Whiteboard is in preview on Windows 10 and shows promise for collaboration

The concept of Whiteboard just works. Sure, there are some performance hiccups but the app is in preview so that isn’t an issue. Being able to draw on a virtual whiteboard and have others join in with very little delay seems like something that should have been a key feature on tablets years ago.

Whiteboard supports multiple ink colors, tools that help you draw shapes and charts, and the ability to type notes. These options make it easy to work together on math problems or any type of handwritten work or just play tic-tac-toe with a friend. Whiteboard will fit in very well in classrooms, workplaces, and could even be used for games and doodling with friends.

The app also lets you insert photos and galleries which help it be more versatile. Whiteboard combines the standard inking tools from many other Microsoft apps such as OneNote and brings in real-time collaboration. Eventually, it might even work as a baked-in part of other Microsoft apps.

A wish list

1c04a_Whiteboard-hero_0 Whiteboard is in preview on Windows 10 and shows promise for collaboration

Whiteboard already has a good set of features in its preview form. Over time it’s certain to grab some more. There are a few specific features we’d love to see added in the future as the app comes out of preview and is developed over time. First up is releasing the app on other platforms. Whiteboard feels handmade for tablets and the reality is that while tablets powered by Windows 10 are popular, the iPad is still a major player in the tablet space. Being able to collaborate in real time using a Surface Pro, an iPad, and a Surface Hub would be a very attractive option for schools and businesses using a number of devices. Microsoft has a plethora of apps on iOS and Android so it’s certainly a possibility that Whiteboard will come as well.

Another feature that would help would be some orientation markers. When drawing on my device and sharing it with my friend, it opened to a different part of the same digital whiteboard. This could be a bug of being in preview but even if it that’s the case, having some markers to make sure you can find an area on the page would be nice. A potential solution would be the option to have the whiteboard be marked with rows and columns. For example, you could tell your coworker to jump to C7 on the grid.

Summary

1c04a_Whiteboard-hero_0 Whiteboard is in preview on Windows 10 and shows promise for collaboration

Whiteboard feels very natural and makes working with other people easier. It supports some nice inking features and the delay between you writing on your device and a friend seeing it is very low.

It’s a very promising preview and it’ll be exciting to see what Microsoft does with it in the future.

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Twitter data shows Samsung users are happier with their phones than iPhone users

Are you loyal to your iPhone?  Ever thought about getting a different device but don’t know if you will be happy with it or not? According to LikeFolio analysis of consumer sentiment on Twitter, Samsung Galaxy phone owners are happier with their phones than Apple (AAPL) iPhone customers.   

LikeFolio uses social-data research to discover consumer trends on public companies, in this case measuring how positively consumers are reacting to the iPhone and Samsung Galaxy phones. The chart below shows that tweets about a Samsung Galaxy phone are significantly more positive than tweets about an Apple iPhone.

3fbb3_spaceball Twitter data shows Samsung users are happier with their phones than iPhone users3fbb3_spaceball Twitter data shows Samsung users are happier with their phones than iPhone users

iPhone vs Galaxy

That huge dip on the chart for Samsung in the fall of 2016 is from the S7 exploding battery recall. Although iPhone’s sentiment has been very consistent around 60%-70% positive, Samsung has recovered in the eyes of consumers and has had a higher percentage of positive sentiment throughout the last year.

Bottom line, Samsung is creating happy consumers with its Galaxy line of phones.

Lower sentiment for the iPhone X

While the new X has a beautiful display, outstanding camera capabilities and new facial recognition, Apple still might have some work to do. The lower sentiment for the iPhone is likely due in part to the X still having a lackluster battery life and it not being very durable, which can result in costly repairs or replacements. 

After all the hype around the release of the iPhone X, we are now finding out that,  according to Consumer Reports, the iPhone X ($999.99-$1,149) is not the best smartphone you can buy despite being Apple’s best iPhone yet.

Samsung still took the first three spots in the Consumer Reports ranking, with the Galaxy S8 ($724.99), S8 Plus ($849.99), and S7 ($594.99). These large price differences could be one reason that iPhone customers seem less thrilled with their device than Samsung Galaxy owners.

The good news for Apple is that the shortcomings of the iPhone X could actually benefit the company. Analysts encourage investors to buy Apple because the iPhone X will lead to a super long cycle for the company. 

Analyst Michael Olson, from Piper Jaffray, expects Apple will release three iPhones next year with the X’s better OLED displays. In addition, he notes 3D sensing component suppliers are being asked to increase their volume by three times next year, according to the firm’s checks.  “iPhone X ‘offspring’ can expand upgrade interest to a larger portion of iPhone Users in Fall-18,” he wrote. “As options for the ‘X’ generation iPhone expand, the ‘shots on goal’ for upgrading increases.”

We still think Apple will continue to dominate with their iPhone X but when it comes to creating happy smartphone users, Samsung seems to be doing things right.

See also:

New retail winners emerged in the Black Friday fight against Amazon  

Here’s a big clue that Amazon will continue to dominate with the iPhone X

These 2 companies could be bucking the devastating real-estate trend

Highland Park HS shows computer science not just about writing code

Computer science teachers at Highland Park High School wanted to show the student body that programming is far less intimidating than they might imagine.

So they planned a week of activities specifically for students not enrolled in the school’s four computer science courses.

Mathematics teachers gave up class time during Computer Science Education Week to expose students to computer programming — perhaps opening windows to career possibilities that hadn’t been in their lines of sight.

“These students have no experience with computer science. We are just trying to give them a bit of a flavor,” said Theresa Edwards, one of the school’s computer science teachers.

New mega-deal shows how health insurers are taking over your access to medical care

The nation’s largest insurer, UnitedHealth Group, announced Wednesday that it would buy a network of 300 primary care and specialist clinics from dialysis giant DaVita for $4.9 billion, in the latest deal reshaping the business of health insurance.

The deal, which does not include DaVita’s main kidney-care business, comes days after CVS Health agreed to buy health insurer Aetna for $69 billion. Both acquisitions reflect strategies to try to own major entry points into health care, whether it is primary care doctors or pharmacists, so that insurers can better coordinate care, keep people healthy and hopefully control rising costs.

“If you think about what Aetna and United are trying to do, basically they’re trying to own the quarterback of care,” said Brian Tanquilut, an equity analyst at investment firm Jefferies. “At the end of the day, the beauty of owning these practices is you have greater control over a person’s whole health-care picture.”

Each strategy is slightly different. United’s business segment, Optum, will acquire DaVita Medical Group, which includes 300 clinics that provide primary and specialist care, as well as urgent care centers and half a dozen surgery care centers. Those clinics serve 1.7 million patients each year in California, Colorado, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico and Washington. The acquisition – set to close next year – will expand the company’s move into clinics and surgical care centers.

University study shows iPhones can miss 21% of your steps – but half of it is your fault

If you use the Activity or Health app on your iPhone to keep track of the number of steps you walk each day, you’re probably doing better than you think. A study by the University of British Columbia found that the iPhone underestimates the number of steps people take by up to 21.5% …


3b66d_screen-shot-2017-03-30-at-14-48-26 University study shows iPhones can miss 21% of your steps – but half of it is your fault

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The study tested iPhones against the gold standard for measuring steps: a waist-mounted pedometer. The team also performed laboratory tests where the number of steps walked on a treadmill were counted manually, to provide an absolute measure.

What they found was interesting. For faster walking speeds, in a lab environment, the iPhone was off by less than 5% – an accuracy considered acceptable even in a dedicated pedometer.

For slower walking paces, however, the iPhone underestimated the number of steps by as much as 9.4%. And in real-life use, the iPhone missed 21.5% of steps – an average of 1,340 per day. The UBC says this is explained both by slow walking and by the fact that people don’t take their phones with them everywhere when they are at home or work. Trips to the bathroom and water cooler are two examples where study participants left their phones behind.

The good news, though, is that the study found that inaccuracies consistently resulted from under-reads, not over-reads.

“For people who are already tracking their steps, they can rest assured that if their phone says they’re getting the recommended 10,000 steps in a day, they are probably getting at least that many, and they are working toward better health,” said lead author Mark Duncan. “From a public health point of view, it’s better that it underestimates than overestimates.”

The study was published in the Journal of Sports Sciences.


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Report shows why Apple should have launched iPhone X sooner

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7c21a_104819324-GettyImages-869824588-1.530x298 Report shows why Apple should have launched iPhone X sooner

Apple’s delayed launch of the iPhone X hurt the iPhone market share around the world, research firm Kantar Worldpanel said on Tuesday.

Apple launched the iPhone X in the beginning of November, instead of in September when it launched the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus.

It’s this window that Kantar believes may have hurt Apple’s market share. Data from Kantar shows that Apple’s share fell by 7.6 percentage points in the U.S. during the October quarter, compared to the same period last year. Likewise, it slipped 8.5 percentage points in Great Britain, 1.6 percentage points in Germany, 6.9 percentage points in Japan and 2.1 percentage points in the European Union Five. Android saw growth in all of those markets except in China.

“It was somewhat inevitable that Apple would see volume share fall once we had a full comparative month of sales taking into account the non-flagship iPhone 8 vs. the flagship iPhone 7 from 2016,” said Dominic Sunnebo, global business unit director for Kantar Worldpanel ComTech. “This decrease is significant and puts pressure on the iPhone X to perform. Considering the complete overhaul that the iPhone X offers, consumers may be postponing their purchase decisions until they can test the iPhone X and decide whether the higher price, compared to the iPhone 8, is worth the premium to them.”

Despite this, Apple said earlier this year that sales during the last quarter exceeded expectations and were up 3 percent year-on-year. The iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus quickly became Apple’s most popular iPhone models and remained the best-selling until the iPhone X went on sale. Also, Apple’s iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus rollout wasn’t completed until the end of October, so some markets didn’t yet have those phones.

Early reports had suggested Apple pushed the launch of the iPhone X due to supply issues, though that hasn’t seemed to be much of an issue. While supply did seem limited initially, the iPhone X is now much easier to buy without much of a wait.

Read the full report from Kantar Worldpanel.

7c21a_104819324-GettyImages-869824588-1.530x298 Report shows why Apple should have launched iPhone X sooner



Report shows why Apple should have launched iPhone X sooner

<!– –>


7c21a_104819324-GettyImages-869824588-1.530x298 Report shows why Apple should have launched iPhone X sooner

Apple’s delayed launch of the iPhone X hurt the iPhone market share around the world, research firm Kantar Worldpanel said on Tuesday.

Apple launched the iPhone X in the beginning of November, instead of in September when it launched the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus.

It’s this window that Kantar believes may have hurt Apple’s market share. Data from Kantar shows that Apple’s share fell by 7.6 percentage points in the U.S. during the October quarter, compared to the same period last year. Likewise, it slipped 8.5 percentage points in Great Britain, 1.6 percentage points in Germany, 6.9 percentage points in Japan and 2.1 percentage points in the European Union Five. Android saw growth in all of those markets except in China.

“It was somewhat inevitable that Apple would see volume share fall once we had a full comparative month of sales taking into account the non-flagship iPhone 8 vs. the flagship iPhone 7 from 2016,” said Dominic Sunnebo, global business unit director for Kantar Worldpanel ComTech. “This decrease is significant and puts pressure on the iPhone X to perform. Considering the complete overhaul that the iPhone X offers, consumers may be postponing their purchase decisions until they can test the iPhone X and decide whether the higher price, compared to the iPhone 8, is worth the premium to them.”

Despite this, Apple said earlier this year that sales during the last quarter exceeded expectations and were up 3 percent year-on-year. The iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus quickly became Apple’s most popular iPhone models and remained the best-selling until the iPhone X went on sale. Also, Apple’s iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus rollout wasn’t completed until the end of October, so some markets didn’t yet have those phones.

Early reports had suggested Apple pushed the launch of the iPhone X due to supply issues, though that hasn’t seemed to be much of an issue. While supply did seem limited initially, the iPhone X is now much easier to buy without much of a wait.

Read the full report from Kantar Worldpanel.

7c21a_104819324-GettyImages-869824588-1.530x298 Report shows why Apple should have launched iPhone X sooner