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Vice Media has a clever plan for the end of net neutrality — it’s building a renegade community-owned internet service


1d1a1_rtr3zwdf Vice Media has a clever plan for the end of net neutrality — it's building a renegade community-owned internet serviceJonathan
Alcorn/Reuters

  • Vice’s Motherboard is attempting to build its own
    community-based internet network in hopes of inspiring a
    nationwide grassroots movement.
  • Motherboard will begin building their community-owned
    internet network sometime next year. 

Vice Media isn’t just grumbling about the
FCC’s move to kill net neutrality,
it’s doing something about
it.

Motherboard, the tech and science website owned by Vice, is
building a community-owned internet network in its Brooklyn home
turf. And it’s documenting the process every step of the way in
hopes of inspiring a nationwide movement.  

The initiative is spearheaded by Motherboard’s
editor-in-chief, Jason Koebler, who has
reported extensively on community internet networks in the US.
Koebler describes community-owned networks as a core coverage
area for Motherboard. “As a publication, we believe that the
internet should remain free and open,” Koebler said in an
interview with Business Insider. “Telecom monopolies have made it
much more difficult for people to access the internet, especially
in rural or underserved communities.”

The Motherboard effort comes as the FCC rolls back Obama-era
regulations that prevented broadband internet providers from
blocking certain websites and from charging more for internet
“fast lanes.”

Koebler’s plan for building a community-based network out of
Vice’s Williamsburg headquarters was
inspired by the success o
f an underserved Detroit community
that built their own internet network earlier this year.
According to Koebler, the connection now provides internet to
three Detroit neighborhoods that were historically ignored by big
telecom. 

All you need is a router

Motherboard is teaming
up with NYC Mesh
, a community-owned internet network in New
York that currently has about 100 monthly users in Bushwick. “The
plan is for us to become another node in their network,” says
Koebler, “We’ll own and operate this node out of their network
and provide internet to more people both in Williamsburg and over
the East River.”

Koebler says that in order to connect to the network, users will
need to purchase a special router, but beyond that it will be
completely free. 

But Koebler’s vision for the network is bigger than providing
free internet to a local neighborhood: he hopes to inspire a
nationwide movement in the light of Thursday’s net neutrality
repeal.

Koebler knows his plan is ambitious. “It’s a daunting task to
replicate the internet across the country,” he said, “But what
we’re seeing is that this is working for pockets of people all
over the country at a pricepoint that’s affordable.”

By building an internet network of its own, Vice plans to
highlight a DIY solution an internet market that’s almost
entirely monopolized by big telecom. “This will be an editorial
initiative for Motherboard for all of 2018,” said Koebler.

Motherboard will extensively document the creation of Vice’s
community network so that others can learn how to make their own.
We want to support what’s
already been done in this area, and do it from a journalistic
endeavor to see how it’s done,” said Koebler, “We’re attempting
to create a playbook for doing this in other towns.”

Koebler says that he hopes to
dispel the myth that internet users must rely entirely on an
internet service provider to obtain online access.

My overall vision for the
internet is that it’s locally owned, it serves the people who
connect to it, and that the people who connect to it own it, or
know the owner who lives down the street.”

You can learn more about Vice’s
community network internet initiative
here
.

Vice Media has a clever plan for the end of net neutrality — it’s building a renegade community-owned internet service


1d1a1_rtr3zwdf Vice Media has a clever plan for the end of net neutrality — it's building a renegade community-owned internet serviceJonathan
Alcorn/Reuters

  • Vice’s Motherboard is attempting to build its own
    community-based internet network in hopes of inspiring a
    nationwide grassroots movement.
  • Motherboard will begin building their community-owned
    internet network sometime next year. 

Vice Media isn’t just grumbling about the
FCC’s move to kill net neutrality,
it’s doing something about
it.

Motherboard, the tech and science website owned by Vice, is
building a community-owned internet network in its Brooklyn home
turf. And it’s documenting the process every step of the way in
hopes of inspiring a nationwide movement.  

The initiative is spearheaded by Motherboard’s
editor-in-chief, Jason Koebler, who has
reported extensively on community internet networks in the US.
Koebler describes community-owned networks as a core coverage
area for Motherboard. “As a publication, we believe that the
internet should remain free and open,” Koebler said in an
interview with Business Insider. “Telecom monopolies have made it
much more difficult for people to access the internet, especially
in rural or underserved communities.”

The Motherboard effort comes as the FCC rolls back Obama-era
regulations that prevented broadband internet providers from
blocking certain websites and from charging more for internet
“fast lanes.”

Koebler’s plan for building a community-based network out of
Vice’s Williamsburg headquarters was
inspired by the success o
f an underserved Detroit community
that built their own internet network earlier this year.
According to Koebler, the connection now provides internet to
three Detroit neighborhoods that were historically ignored by big
telecom. 

All you need is a router

Motherboard is teaming
up with NYC Mesh
, a community-owned internet network in New
York that currently has about 100 monthly users in Bushwick. “The
plan is for us to become another node in their network,” says
Koebler, “We’ll own and operate this node out of their network
and provide internet to more people both in Williamsburg and over
the East River.”

Koebler says that in order to connect to the network, users will
need to purchase a special router, but beyond that it will be
completely free. 

But Koebler’s vision for the network is bigger than providing
free internet to a local neighborhood: he hopes to inspire a
nationwide movement in the light of Thursday’s net neutrality
repeal.

Koebler knows his plan is ambitious. “It’s a daunting task to
replicate the internet across the country,” he said, “But what
we’re seeing is that this is working for pockets of people all
over the country at a pricepoint that’s affordable.”

By building an internet network of its own, Vice plans to
highlight a DIY solution an internet market that’s almost
entirely monopolized by big telecom. “This will be an editorial
initiative for Motherboard for all of 2018,” said Koebler.

Motherboard will extensively document the creation of Vice’s
community network so that others can learn how to make their own.
We want to support what’s
already been done in this area, and do it from a journalistic
endeavor to see how it’s done,” said Koebler, “We’re attempting
to create a playbook for doing this in other towns.”

Koebler says that he hopes to
dispel the myth that internet users must rely entirely on an
internet service provider to obtain online access.

My overall vision for the
internet is that it’s locally owned, it serves the people who
connect to it, and that the people who connect to it own it, or
know the owner who lives down the street.”

You can learn more about Vice’s
community network internet initiative
here
.

Vice Media has a clever plan for the end of net neutrality — it’s building a renegade community-owned internet service


1d1a1_rtr3zwdf Vice Media has a clever plan for the end of net neutrality — it's building a renegade community-owned internet serviceJonathan
Alcorn/Reuters

  • Vice’s Motherboard is attempting to build its own
    community-based internet network in hopes of inspiring a
    nationwide grassroots movement.
  • Motherboard will begin building their community-owned
    internet network sometime next year. 

Vice Media isn’t just grumbling about the
FCC’s move to kill net neutrality,
it’s doing something about
it.

Motherboard, the tech and science website owned by Vice, is
building a community-owned internet network in its Brooklyn home
turf. And it’s documenting the process every step of the way in
hopes of inspiring a nationwide movement.  

The initiative is spearheaded by Motherboard’s
editor-in-chief, Jason Koebler, who has
reported extensively on community internet networks in the US.
Koebler describes community-owned networks as a core coverage
area for Motherboard. “As a publication, we believe that the
internet should remain free and open,” Koebler said in an
interview with Business Insider. “Telecom monopolies have made it
much more difficult for people to access the internet, especially
in rural or underserved communities.”

The Motherboard effort comes as the FCC rolls back Obama-era
regulations that prevented broadband internet providers from
blocking certain websites and from charging more for internet
“fast lanes.”

Koebler’s plan for building a community-based network out of
Vice’s Williamsburg headquarters was
inspired by the success o
f an underserved Detroit community
that built their own internet network earlier this year.
According to Koebler, the connection now provides internet to
three Detroit neighborhoods that were historically ignored by big
telecom. 

All you need is a router

Motherboard is teaming
up with NYC Mesh
, a community-owned internet network in New
York that currently has about 100 monthly users in Bushwick. “The
plan is for us to become another node in their network,” says
Koebler, “We’ll own and operate this node out of their network
and provide internet to more people both in Williamsburg and over
the East River.”

Koebler says that in order to connect to the network, users will
need to purchase a special router, but beyond that it will be
completely free. 

But Koebler’s vision for the network is bigger than providing
free internet to a local neighborhood: he hopes to inspire a
nationwide movement in the light of Thursday’s net neutrality
repeal.

Koebler knows his plan is ambitious. “It’s a daunting task to
replicate the internet across the country,” he said, “But what
we’re seeing is that this is working for pockets of people all
over the country at a pricepoint that’s affordable.”

By building an internet network of its own, Vice plans to
highlight a DIY solution an internet market that’s almost
entirely monopolized by big telecom. “This will be an editorial
initiative for Motherboard for all of 2018,” said Koebler.

Motherboard will extensively document the creation of Vice’s
community network so that others can learn how to make their own.
We want to support what’s
already been done in this area, and do it from a journalistic
endeavor to see how it’s done,” said Koebler, “We’re attempting
to create a playbook for doing this in other towns.”

Koebler says that he hopes to
dispel the myth that internet users must rely entirely on an
internet service provider to obtain online access.

My overall vision for the
internet is that it’s locally owned, it serves the people who
connect to it, and that the people who connect to it own it, or
know the owner who lives down the street.”

You can learn more about Vice’s
community network internet initiative
here
.

Raspberry Pi clone Libre Renegade: $35 gets you Android, USB 3.0 and 4K video

84bdb_librerenegade Raspberry Pi clone Libre Renegade: $35 gets you Android, USB 3.0 and 4K video

The Renegade developer board takes on Raspberry Pi.


Libre Computer

Libre Computer, a Shenzhen-based firm, is touting a new Raspberry Pi Model B clone that also costs $35 but offers some better specs than the more famous developer board.

For now, the board dubbed Renegade is only available to back on Indiegogo and follows Libre Computer’s earlier Kickstarter-promoted Raspberry Pi 3 clone, Tritium.

The Renegade, spotted by CNX-Software, features up to 4GB DDR4 RAM, USB 3.0, Gigabit Ethernet, a Rockchip RK3328 quad-core Cortex A53 processor and an ARM Mali-450MP2 GPU, two USB 2.0 Type A ports, and one USB 3.0 type A port. That’s one fewer USB port than the Raspberry Pi.

As TechRepublic notes, the Renegade DDR4 memory should be faster than the Pi 3’s DDR2, and the Gigabit Ethernet should also offer faster data transfers than the Pi. The same goes for USB 3.0.

The little computer is said to support Ubuntu 16.04 with Rockchip’s Linux 4.4 Kernel and Mainline Linux 4.14 LTS Kernel. It can also run Android 7.1 Nougat.

Renegade’s maker says it has completed product design, initial software support and testing. Delivery to backers begins in January 2018. It also says it’s sorted out software support for media center, gaming and desktop computing.

The 1GB model is available to backers for $35 but if this product goes to retail it will cost $45. It’s also available in 2GB 4GB options. The 4GB model costs $70 during the campaign but is planned for retail at $80. There’s also a $100 option that includes a heatsink, active cooling case 5 volt, 2.5 amp power supply and 32GV MicroSD card.

So far the Renegade campaign has only raised $625 of the $10,000 goal, however the Tritium campaign that began in November has so far raised over $37,000 from over 600 backers.

Previous and related coverage

Raspberry Pi, Linux on ARM users: Now you get a new browser option with Vivaldi

Vivaldi has unveiled a browser for Raspberry Pi and may soon have a build for smartphones, too.

Google offers Raspberry Pi owners this new AI vision kit to spot cats, people, emotions

Google’s Vision Kit lets you build your own computer-vision system for $45, but you’ll need your own Raspberry Pi.

Raspberry Pi supercomputer: Los Alamos to use 10,000 tiny boards to test software

Los Alamos National Lab finds its answer to ‘exascale’ software development in the tiny Raspberry Pi.




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