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Pi Case for OtterBox uniVERSE Connects Your iPhone to a Raspberry Pi and More

Want to use a Raspberry Pi with your iPhone? Well, you’re in luck. OtterBox pre-engineered a Raspberry Pi case just for that. The OtterBox uniVERSE smartphone case system not only protects your iPhone from drops, it allows you connect all manner of phone accessories. The OtterBox uniVERSE case system is available for iPhone 6-8, iPad Air 2 and iPad Pro (9.7”). They even made their own Raspberry Pi Enclosure for the uniVerse case system, available on YouMagine for free download. You can download and 3D print it yourself or hit the Print on 3DHubs button to find a local maker who can print it for you.

1b010_2017-09-23-12.06.03-625x625 Pi Case for OtterBox uniVERSE Connects Your iPhone to a Raspberry Pi and More

There are a host of offerings from 3rd party companies for the uniVerse case system, many of which would be very useful to makers and DIYers. Tripod mounts make it easy to photograph your projects like a pro. The Square adapter allows you to take payments on the go, when you sell your awesome creations. Thermal camera mounts, slim wallets with tool cards, battery pack and flash card mounts help you get more utility from your phone.

1b010_2017-09-23-12.06.03-625x625 Pi Case for OtterBox uniVERSE Connects Your iPhone to a Raspberry Pi and More

There’s definitely room for the inventive maker or mad scientist to come up with their own wild creations to attach to their iPhone or iPad. In addition to the Pi Enclosure, OtterBox also released other free CAD files for the uniVERSE case system. They run the gamut, ranging from simple integrated phone stands and bottle openers, to a mini-drone case, so you can keep your drone with your phone and protect them both. And if you have some ideas of your own for interesting accouterments, OtterBox released the CAD files for the uniVERSE connector through YouMagine so that you can create your own accessories.

 

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Build a cheap computer for your kids with Kano OS and a Raspberry …

Kano is a platform that’s designed to teach kids how to build a computer, what every part of a circuit board does, and finally how to code apps or games. The platform is available in predesigned kits made for kids.

50dcc_top5raspberrypi Build a cheap computer for your kids with Kano OS and a Raspberry ...

Kano’s computer kits are attractive simply because each one includes the core of what you need to get started with the kid-friendly platform. The basic kit includes a Bluetooth keyboard with touchpad and all necessary cables. The Computer Kit Complete includes a 10.1-inch display for a laptop-like setup.

However, if you have a Raspberry Pi or would prefer to let your child pick and choose the various parts of a computer just for them (yes, Minecraft is included!), then putting together your own Kano OS computer is the way to go.

What you need

  • Raspberry Pi 1, 2, or 3 (enclosure optional)
  • USB Keyboard
  • USB Mouse
  • HDMI Cable, microUSB cable with wall adapter for power
  • Monitor or television with HDMI input
  • 3.5 mm speakers or headphones
  • microSD card (8GB or bigger)

If you don’t have an extra keyboard or mouse collecting dust in a drawer somewhere, I’ve found the inexpensive Amazon Basics version of each more than sufficient. If you plan on helping your child go through the different games and lessons Kano offers, hooking up a Raspberry Pi to a television is an easy way to avoid buying a monitor.

Download, install Kano OS

50dcc_top5raspberrypi Build a cheap computer for your kids with Kano OS and a Raspberry ...


Screenshot by Jason Cipriani/CNET

Despite selling computer kits, Kano’s operating system is open-source and available for anyone to download and install. I had no idea the OS itself was available and mistakenly believed the only way for my kids to experience what Kano has to offer was to purchase hardware from the company. I was wrong.

Kano walks you through installing KanoOS on a microSD card, which is then used with your Raspberry Pi 1, 2 or 3 on this page.

The gist is this: Download the image file from Kano. Use Etcher to properly install Kano OS onto the microSD card. Once finished, place the card into the Raspberry Pi and power it up.

It’s installed… now what?

50dcc_top5raspberrypi Build a cheap computer for your kids with Kano OS and a Raspberry ...


Jason Cipriani/CNET

The first time you boot up Kano OS, your child is walked through some basic terminal commands and creates a user account. With an account setup, your child now has access to a computer he or she built (with your help, of course) as well as dozens of free educational apps and services.

Navigating through Story Mode, a character walks across the digital version of the Raspberry Pi’s circuit board, with stops at places like the power port or HDMI connection, and full explanations through games of each one’s purpose.

My kids and I have found the way Kano OS teaches to be fun, interactive and insightful all at the same time. Also available on Kano OS are shortcuts to a Chrome browser, a music app, and a hackable version of Minecraft (complete with tutorials).

Build a cheap computer for your kids with Kano OS and a Raspberry Pi

Kano is a platform that’s designed to teach kids how to build a computer, what every part of a circuit board does, and finally how to code apps or games. The platform is available in predesigned kits made for kids.

b90e7_top5raspberrypi Build a cheap computer for your kids with Kano OS and a Raspberry Pi

Kano’s computer kits are attractive simply because each one includes the core of what you need to get started with the kid-friendly platform. The basic kit includes a Bluetooth keyboard with touchpad and all necessary cables. The Computer Kit Complete includes a 10.1-inch display for a laptop-like setup.

However, if you have a Raspberry Pi or would prefer to let your child pick and choose the various parts of a computer just for them (yes, Minecraft is included!), then putting together your own Kano OS computer is the way to go.

What you need

  • Raspberry Pi 1, 2, or 3 (enclosure optional)
  • USB Keyboard
  • USB Mouse
  • HDMI Cable, microUSB cable with wall adapter for power
  • Monitor or television with HDMI input
  • 3.5 mm speakers or headphones
  • microSD card (8GB or bigger)

If you don’t have an extra keyboard or mouse collecting dust in a drawer somewhere, I’ve found the inexpensive Amazon Basics version of each more than sufficient. If you plan on helping your child go through the different games and lessons Kano offers, hooking up a Raspberry Pi to a television is an easy way to avoid buying a monitor.

Download, install Kano OS

b90e7_top5raspberrypi Build a cheap computer for your kids with Kano OS and a Raspberry Pi


Screenshot by Jason Cipriani/CNET

Despite selling computer kits, Kano’s operating system is open-source and available for anyone to download and install. I had no idea the OS itself was available and mistakenly believed the only way for my kids to experience what Kano has to offer was to purchase hardware from the company. I was wrong.

Kano walks you through installing KanoOS on a microSD card, which is then used with your Raspberry Pi 1, 2 or 3 on this page.

The gist is this: Download the image file from Kano. Use Etcher to properly install Kano OS onto the microSD card. Once finished, place the card into the Raspberry Pi and power it up.

It’s installed… now what?

b90e7_top5raspberrypi Build a cheap computer for your kids with Kano OS and a Raspberry Pi


Jason Cipriani/CNET

The first time you boot up Kano OS, your child is walked through some basic terminal commands and creates a user account. With an account setup, your child now has access to a computer he or she built (with your help, of course) as well as dozens of free educational apps and services.

Navigating through Story Mode, a character walks across the digital version of the Raspberry Pi’s circuit board, with stops at places like the power port or HDMI connection, and full explanations through games of each one’s purpose.

My kids and I have found the way Kano OS teaches to be fun, interactive and insightful all at the same time. Also available on Kano OS are shortcuts to a Chrome browser, a music app, and a hackable version of Minecraft (complete with tutorials).

Size of a Raspberry Pi, power of a MacBook: The Window 10-powered LattePanda Alpha

ec79d_20171208giftideasjasonbill Size of a Raspberry Pi, power of a MacBook: The Window 10-powered LattePanda Alpha

If you’re after a computer close to the size of the tiny Raspberry Pi but approaching the power of the MacBook, then you may want to check out the LattePanda Alpha.

However, it’s worth noting the LattePanda Alpha is not a Pi competitor. While the Pi costs just $35, the LattePanda Alpha starts at $289.

The difference is reflected in the specs, with the LattePanda Alpha having more in common with a laptop than a low-cost board like the Pi.

The LattePanda Alpha uses the same class of Intel processor as found in this year’s 12-inch MacBook, a 7th generation, Intel Core m3.

Backing up this processor is 8GB of DDR3 memory and 64GB Flash storage, alongside Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11ac Wi-Fi and USB 3.0 ports, a USB Type-C port, 4K video out.

While the board’s makers DFRobot say the Alpha will ship with Windows 10 Pro, they add it will also be compatible with a range of Linux-based OSes.

The board—which is about 70% the length of the iPhone 7 Plus—is designed to be used to be used by developers working in a wide range of fields, from robotics to internet of things, and as such has the necessary electronics for adding a wide-range of custom hardware to the board.

SEE: Hardware spotlight: The Raspberry Pi

The Alpha has 2 x 50-Pin headers for hooking up hardware, as well as an Arduino Leonardo co-processor.

Alongside the Alpha, the board’s makers will also release a version of the board without the eMMC storage for $269, as well as the lower-specced LattePanda Delta, which starts at $129.

The Delta runs on an Intel Celeron N4100 processor, has 4GB of RAM but still keeps many of the advantages of the Alpha board, such as 802.11ac Wi-Fi and 3 x USB 3.0 ports.

Both boards are being crowdfunded via Kickstarter, and as of publication have passed their £72,611 funding target, with just shy of £97,000 raised with 56 days left to go.

DFRobot estimate that the boards, which are also available with a 7-inch touchscreen display, will ship in May next year.

It is not the first Windows 10-based, developer board released by the company, with an earlier machine selling for around $120. That initial board was again higher specced and priced than the Pi, but also attracted some reports that the board overheated without additional cooling, resulting in the processor being throttled to a slower speed.

ec79d_20171208giftideasjasonbill Size of a Raspberry Pi, power of a MacBook: The Window 10-powered LattePanda Alpha

The LattePanda Alpha.

ec79d_20171208giftideasjasonbill Size of a Raspberry Pi, power of a MacBook: The Window 10-powered LattePanda Alpha

The specs for the LattePanda boards.

Read more about the Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi, Linux on ARM Users: Now You Get a New Browser Option with Vivaldi

Brought to you by

Vivaldi now supports Linux on ARM chips, including Raspberry Pi 3

Vivaldi said on Tuesday, December 5,  that it released an optimized version of its web browser for Linux distributions running on devices with ARM-based processors, such as the Raspberry Pi 3, the Raspberry Pi Zero, and the Asus Tinker board. The browser joins Vivaldi’s other builds for Windows, MacOS, and Linux installed on machines with x86-based chips manufactured by Intel and AMD.

“Vivaldi is a web surfer’s complete toolbox that you can personalize and make your own. We strive to add more flexibility for the thriving culture of computer hobbyists and hope that every owner of Raspberry Pi will have fun using Vivaldi,” says Jon von Tetzchner.

The browser is served up as a DEB file, and requires a superuser account to unpack and install. It’s optimized for small devices relying on single-core ARM-based processors, but users can tweak the browser’s settings to get even better performance. These include the ability to disable animated images, and setting the default viewing mode to filter out everything but text (aka Reader Mode).

Vivaldi users shouldn’t experience a “watered-down” version of the browser on ARM-based devices, though. According to Vivaldi, everything offered in the other versions are completely intact, such as cramming multiple pages under a single tab, capturing screenshots, and using the in-browser note-taking component. We took the Windows 10-based version for a spin earlier this year right here.

Vivaldi is the brainchild of former Opera CEO Jon von Tetzchner. He parted ways with the company and browser he helped create in 2013 to continue his vision of a solution built for power users. By then, the Opera browser was on a different path than what he originally envisioned, so he set out to pick up where Opera 14 left off with a completely new solution called Vivaldi.

The name stems from Italian Baroque composer and virtuoso violinist Antonio Lucio Vivaldi. Tetzchner wanted web surfers to be “composers,” enabling them to customize the web browsing experience in every way possible. The browser’s palate of editing tools span from customizing the interface colors to rearranging its components to viewing detailed statistics of where the user goes online.

Vivaldi officially hit the scene for Windows, MacOS, and Linux in 2016, and is now finally available for Linux machines running on ARM-based chips. For users running Raspbian, Vivaldi says all that’s needed to install the browser is to double-click on the downloaded installer. Instructions for all other Linux-based distributions will depend on the platform and user permissions.

“Enthusiastic Raspberry Pi users who are looking for a more feature-rich and flexible browser, will find Vivaldi a thrilling experience,” Tetzchner said.

To download Vivaldi for Linux running on ARM-based devices, head to Vivaldi.com.




Raspberry Pi clone Libre Renegade: $35 gets you Android, USB 3.0 and 4K video

84bdb_librerenegade Raspberry Pi clone Libre Renegade: $35 gets you Android, USB 3.0 and 4K video

The Renegade developer board takes on Raspberry Pi.


Libre Computer

Libre Computer, a Shenzhen-based firm, is touting a new Raspberry Pi Model B clone that also costs $35 but offers some better specs than the more famous developer board.

For now, the board dubbed Renegade is only available to back on Indiegogo and follows Libre Computer’s earlier Kickstarter-promoted Raspberry Pi 3 clone, Tritium.

The Renegade, spotted by CNX-Software, features up to 4GB DDR4 RAM, USB 3.0, Gigabit Ethernet, a Rockchip RK3328 quad-core Cortex A53 processor and an ARM Mali-450MP2 GPU, two USB 2.0 Type A ports, and one USB 3.0 type A port. That’s one fewer USB port than the Raspberry Pi.

As TechRepublic notes, the Renegade DDR4 memory should be faster than the Pi 3’s DDR2, and the Gigabit Ethernet should also offer faster data transfers than the Pi. The same goes for USB 3.0.

The little computer is said to support Ubuntu 16.04 with Rockchip’s Linux 4.4 Kernel and Mainline Linux 4.14 LTS Kernel. It can also run Android 7.1 Nougat.

Renegade’s maker says it has completed product design, initial software support and testing. Delivery to backers begins in January 2018. It also says it’s sorted out software support for media center, gaming and desktop computing.

The 1GB model is available to backers for $35 but if this product goes to retail it will cost $45. It’s also available in 2GB 4GB options. The 4GB model costs $70 during the campaign but is planned for retail at $80. There’s also a $100 option that includes a heatsink, active cooling case 5 volt, 2.5 amp power supply and 32GV MicroSD card.

So far the Renegade campaign has only raised $625 of the $10,000 goal, however the Tritium campaign that began in November has so far raised over $37,000 from over 600 backers.

Previous and related coverage

Raspberry Pi, Linux on ARM users: Now you get a new browser option with Vivaldi

Vivaldi has unveiled a browser for Raspberry Pi and may soon have a build for smartphones, too.

Google offers Raspberry Pi owners this new AI vision kit to spot cats, people, emotions

Google’s Vision Kit lets you build your own computer-vision system for $45, but you’ll need your own Raspberry Pi.

Raspberry Pi supercomputer: Los Alamos to use 10,000 tiny boards to test software

Los Alamos National Lab finds its answer to ‘exascale’ software development in the tiny Raspberry Pi.

Raspberry Pi, Linux on ARM users: Now you get a new browser …

002c1_59282857e4b039651ca5bce1-1280x7201may262017144126poster Raspberry Pi, Linux on ARM users: Now you get a new browser ...

Raspberry Pi users now have one more browser to choose from besides Chromium, Firefox, and Midori, with the newly-announced availability of an experimental version of power-user-focused Vivaldi.

The Blink-based browser from former Opera CEO Jon von Tetzchner is expanding beyond Windows, macOS, and Linux PCs to a range of ARM-based developer boards, including the Raspberry Pi, CubieBoard, Asus Tinker Board, and more.

Vivaldi doesn’t yet have a mobile browser but it was its work on one that helped spawn the build for Raspberry Pi, according to the company. It also points to Samsung’s DeX project as a potential new platform for Vivaldi. DeX aims to run full Linux on a Galaxy phone connected to a display.

With over 14 million Raspberry Pi units now having been sold since 2012, it and other ARM-based developer boards offer a fringe but growing market for Vivaldi.

Vivaldi developers in Oslo point out that the browser can be helpful on a Raspberry Pi connected to a TV as an alternative to the basic browsers that come with smart TVs.

The Vivaldi build for ARM is currently considered experimental and so may not get regular bug fixes. However, Vivaldi will take reports from users.

002c1_59282857e4b039651ca5bce1-1280x7201may262017144126poster Raspberry Pi, Linux on ARM users: Now you get a new browser ...

Vivaldi’s developers say their browser is better suited to Raspberry Pi users than Chromium, which ships with Raspbian, because of Vivaldi’s customization options.


Vivaldi

To install Vivaldi on the Debian-based Raspbian, users need only double-click on the downloaded installer. The company has a set-up page to help users get the browser running on non-Debian based Linux distributions, too.

Vivaldi’s developers argue that their browser is better suited to Raspberry Pi users than Chromium, which ships with Raspbian, because of Vivaldi’s customization options.

Perhaps most importantly, Vivaldi can help Raspberry Pi users scrimp on resources by turning off animated GIFs. There’s also a Reader View for easier reading, and Pi users can take advantage of other features like tab grouping, screenshot capture, and note taking.

Vivaldi is using its new ARM browser to build its community and tap into the Pi community. The company is offering fans the chance to win a Raspberry Pi Model 3, a Vivaldi case, and 16GB microSD card with Vivaldi pre-installed in exchange for sharing a crazy Pi project on its blog.

“We are excited to unveil Vivaldi for the popular development board Raspberry Pi and other Linux-based ARM devices. Enthusiastic Raspberry Pi users who are looking for a more feature-rich and flexible browser, will find Vivaldi a thrilling experience,” said von Tetzchner.

Previous and related coverage

Google offers Raspberry Pi owners this new AI vision kit to spot cats, people, emotions

Google’s Vision Kit lets you build your own computer-vision system for $45, but you’ll need your own Raspberry Pi.

Raspberry Pi supercomputer: Los Alamos to use 10,000 tiny boards to test software

Los Alamos National Lab finds its answer to ‘exascale’ software development in the tiny Raspberry Pi.

Read more on Vivaldi

Raspberry Pi, Linux on ARM users: Now you get a new browser option with Vivaldi

ca47f_59282857e4b039651ca5bce1-1280x7201may262017144126poster Raspberry Pi, Linux on ARM users: Now you get a new browser option with Vivaldi

Raspberry Pi users now have one more browser to choose from besides Chromium, Firefox, and Midori, with the newly-announced availability of an experimental version of power-user-focused Vivaldi.

The Blink-based browser from former Opera CEO Jon von Tetzchner is expanding beyond Windows, macOS, and Linux PCs to a range of ARM-based developer boards, including the Raspberry Pi, CubieBoard, Asus Tinker Board, and more.

Vivaldi doesn’t yet have a mobile browser but it was its work on one that helped spawn the build for Raspberry Pi, according to the company. It also points to Samsung’s DeX project as a potential new platform for Vivaldi. DeX aims to run full Linux on a Galaxy phone connected to a display.

With over 14 million Raspberry Pi units now having been sold since 2012, it and other ARM-based developer boards offer a fringe but growing market for Vivaldi.

Vivaldi developers in Oslo point out that the browser can be helpful on a Raspberry Pi connected to a TV as an alternative to the basic browsers that come with smart TVs.

The Vivaldi build for ARM is currently considered experimental and so may not get regular bug fixes. However, Vivaldi will take reports from users.

ca47f_59282857e4b039651ca5bce1-1280x7201may262017144126poster Raspberry Pi, Linux on ARM users: Now you get a new browser option with Vivaldi

Vivaldi’s developers say their browser is better suited to Raspberry Pi users than Chromium, which ships with Raspbian, because of Vivaldi’s customization options.


Vivaldi

To install Vivaldi on the Debian-based Raspbian, users need only double-click on the downloaded installer. The company has a set-up page to help users get the browser running on non-Debian based Linux distributions, too.

Vivaldi’s developers argue that their browser is better suited to Raspberry Pi users than Chromium, which ships with Raspbian, because of Vivaldi’s customization options.

Perhaps most importantly, Vivaldi can help Raspberry Pi users scrimp on resources by turning off animated GIFs. There’s also a Reader View for easier reading, and Pi users can take advantage of other features like tab grouping, screenshot capture, and note taking.

Vivaldi is using its new ARM browser to build its community and tap into the Pi community. The company is offering fans the chance to win a Raspberry Pi Model 3, a Vivaldi case, and 16GB microSD card with Vivaldi pre-installed in exchange for sharing a crazy Pi project on its blog.

“We are excited to unveil Vivaldi for the popular development board Raspberry Pi and other Linux-based ARM devices. Enthusiastic Raspberry Pi users who are looking for a more feature-rich and flexible browser, will find Vivaldi a thrilling experience,” said von Tetzchner.

Previous and related coverage

Google offers Raspberry Pi owners this new AI vision kit to spot cats, people, emotions

Google’s Vision Kit lets you build your own computer-vision system for $45, but you’ll need your own Raspberry Pi.

Raspberry Pi supercomputer: Los Alamos to use 10,000 tiny boards to test software

Los Alamos National Lab finds its answer to ‘exascale’ software development in the tiny Raspberry Pi.

Read more on Vivaldi

Raspberry Pi, Linux on Arm users: Now you get a new browser option with Vivaldi

e6e18_vivaldiraspberrypi Raspberry Pi, Linux on Arm users: Now you get a new browser option with Vivaldi

Vivaldi’s developers say their browser is better suited to Raspberry Pi users than Chromium, which ships with Raspbian, because of Vivaldi’s customization options.


Vivaldi

Raspberry Pi users now have one more browser to choose from besides Chromium, Firefox and Midori, with the newly announced availability of an experimental version of power-user focused Vivaldi.

The Blink-based browser from former Opera CEO Jon von Tetzchner is expanding beyond Windows, macOS and Linux PCs to a range of Arm-based developer boards, including the Raspberry Pi, CubieBoard, Asus Tinker Board, and more.

Vivaldi doesn’t yet have a mobile browser but it was its work on one that helped spawn the build for Raspberry Pi, according to the company. It also points to Samsung’s DeX project as a potential new platform for Vivaldi. DeX aims to run full Linux on a Galaxy phone connected to a display.

With over 14 million Raspberry Pi units now having been sold since 2012, it and other Arm-based developer boards offer a fringe but growing market for Vivaldi.

Vivaldi developers in Oslo point out that the browser can be helpful on a Raspberry Pi connected to a TV as an alternative to the basic browsers that come with smart TVs.

The Vivaldi build for Arm is currently considered experimental and so may not get regular bug fixes. However, Vivaldi will take reports from users.

To install Vivaldi on the Debian-based Raspbian, users need only double-click on the downloaded installer. The company has a set-up page to help users get the browser running on non-Debian based Linux distributions, too.

Vivaldi’s developers argue that their browser is better suited to Raspberry Pi users than Chromium, which ships with Raspbian, because of Vivaldi’s customization options.

Perhaps most importantly, Vivaldi can help Raspberry Pi users scrimp on resources by turning off animated GIFs. There’s also a Reader View for easier reading, and Pi users can take advantage of other features like tab grouping, screenshot capture, and note taking.

Vivaldi is using its new Arm browser to build its community and tap into the Pi community. The company is offering fans the chance to win a Raspberry Pi Model 3, a Vivaldi case, and 16GB microSD card with Vivaldi pre-installed in exchange for sharing a crazy Pi project on its blog.

“We are excited to unveil Vivaldi for the popular development board Raspberry Pi and other Linux-based ARM devices. Enthusiastic Raspberry Pi users who are looking for a more feature-rich and flexible browser, will find Vivaldi a thrilling experience,” said von Tetzchner.

Previous and related coverage

Google offers Raspberry Pi owners this new AI vision kit to spot cats, people, emotions

Google’s Vision Kit lets you build your own computer-vision system for $45, but you’ll need your own Raspberry Pi.

Raspberry Pi supercomputer: Los Alamos to use 10,000 tiny boards to test software

Los Alamos National Lab finds its answer to ‘exascale’ software development in the tiny Raspberry Pi.

Raspberry Pi 4: A specs wishlist for the next $35 computer

b2015_starterkit Raspberry Pi 4: A specs wishlist for the next $35 computer

The Raspberry Pi 4 doesn’t exist—the Raspberry Pi 3 is the most recent board—but there are still no shortage of posts from Pi enthusiasts, listing the must-have tech they want to see in the next iteration of the $35 computer.

Here are some of the most-requested upgrades for the Raspberry Pi 4.

However, it’s worth noting several caveats. Eben Upton, the co-creator of the Raspberry Pi, has said not to expect the Pi 4 until at least 2019—as it is likely to be a major overhaul based around a new system-on-chip (SoC)—and has also stated how important the $35 price tag has been to the success of the Pi, so it’s unlikely to have earth-shattering specs.

Faster CPU

The Raspberry Pi 3’s mobile-phone based hardware is nippy compared to its predecessors—some 10x faster than the first-gen Raspberry Pi. However, the 1.2GHz, quad-core, ARM Cortex A53-based processor in the Pi 3 is today rather long in the tooth compared to those found in recent phones.

Boards released after the Pi 3 was launched in 2016 have packed in faster and newer processors, ranging up to Octa core. While the need to keep costs below $35 would limit the spec of the CPU, a modest bump to the clockspeed to, say, 1.5GHz or so seems feasible, and would deliver a nice performance boost when paired with a system-on-a-chip with a newer, more efficient architecture.

SEE: Hardware spotlight: The Raspberry Pi

More memory

A boost to the Pi 3’s RAM would make sense, as the current board is capable of running 64-bit software but its 1GB memory limits the range of 64-bit operating systems that can be run on the machine.

The Pi also uses DDR2 memory, and even though DDR5 memory will likely be available by the time the Pi 4 launches, a move to DDR3 would allow the Pi to shift data around the board noticeably faster than existing RAM. If the Pi 4 doesn’t launch until 2019 then at least 2GB of DDR3 would make a difference while still keeping the Pi 4 within budget.

Gigabit Ethernet

The Raspberry Pi has had 10/100 Ethernet since the first Pi was launched in 2012. While this network connection is typically fast enough for those using the Pi as a desktop, those using the Pi with network-attached storage report middling speeds. The bigger issue than the lack of Gigabit Ethernet is the Pi 3 has a bottleneck in its shared USB and networking data bus.

One way to offset this limitation is to buy a USB Gigabit LAN adapter for the Pi, with tests showing certain models can reach 321Mbps throughput, far faster than the 94.4Mbps connection reached by the Pi’s 10/100 connection. This won’t be an incremental upgrade, as again it will require a new SoC so that the Gigabit Ethernet isn’t held back by the shared USB and Ethernet bus.

USB 3.0/3.1

Support for USB 3.1 would make USB-attached drives far more attractive, with a maximum speed of 10Gbps, 20x that of the Pi’s existing USB 2.0 ports. It would also make a range of other peripherals feasible for use with the Pi. The downside would be the cost this would add to the Pi.

Again this change would require a completely new SoC, so is unlikely to see the light of day before the move to the Raspberry Pi 4. Its addition is also somewhat uncertain due to the need to stay within the $35 price point, so maybe USB 3.0 would be more likely.

4K video

Currently the Pi doesn’t support 4K video playback, and is only capable of smooth video playback at resolutions up to 1080p and a HDMI 1.3 output. As 4K screens start to take off, support for 4K video would be a real boon, particularly for those who want to use the Pi 3 as a media center. Perhaps the Pi 4 could include the ARM Mali-450 GPU, which can accelerate the playback of 10bit 4K HEVC(H265)-encoded video, as well as supporting HDMI 2.0. Again though, this is hardly an essential for a machine originally designed to teach kids to code. That said there is already a developer board with support for 4K video, USB 3.0 and 2GB RAM, due to begin shipping in December.

802.11ac Wi-Fi

Since the Pi 4 will likely not be released until 2019, it seems almost certain that the next Pi will have 802.11ac Wi-Fi, offering speeds of up to 1.3Gbps, significantly quicker than the 0.45Gbps available in the Pi 3. This probably falls under the category of a nice to have, rather than essential, particularly if Gigabit Ethernet is added and the networking/USB bottleneck removed.

SATA

A high-speed interface like SATA or SATA II would give the Pi a welcome boost to how quickly it could pull data from storage. The Pi 3 is currently limited to pulling data from an SD card, a far slower form of storage, or external an SSD hooked to the Pi 3 via USB 2.0, where transfers are bottlenecked by the USB connection, or from network-attached storage.

That said, if the USB were updated to 3.0, or even better 3.1, there would be less need for SATA due to availability of USB-attached SSDs.

What else would you like to see included in the Pi 4? Tell us in the comments below.

Read more about the Raspberry Pi

Vivaldi Browser Now Available For Raspberry Pi And ARM Based Linux Hardware

4ddea_Vivaldi-Browser Vivaldi Browser Now Available For Raspberry Pi And ARM Based Linux Hardware

Raspberry Pi enthusiasts and those of you using ARM based Linux devices, may be interested to know that Vivaldi has this week released an experimental build of the Vivaldi browser which is now available to download for Linux on ARM devices, including the awesome Pi mini PC. In addition to the Windows, macOS and Linux (x86/x86-64), operating systems. The Vivaldi browser is now available for a range of ARM based Linux devices and is now supported by the Raspberry Pi Zero, Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3 systems as well as CubieBoard, ASUS Tinker Board and more. Jon von Tetzchner, CEO at Vivaldi Technologies explains :

We are excited to unveil Vivaldi for the popular development board Raspberry Pi and other Linux based ARM devices. Enthusiastic Raspberry Pi users who are looking for a more feature-rich and flexible browser, will find Vivaldi a thrilling experience.

Features of the Vivaldi browser include :

– Advanced tab management – ability to group, tile, move and pin tabs.
– Side Panel with easy access to bookmarks, downloads, a “tree-style” access to tabs, notes, browsing history and websites of users’ choice.
– Built-in functionality such as the screenshot Capture tool, Notes and Image Properties.
– Powerful History overview that lets users explore their browsing patterns, backed by statistics and visual clues.
– Unique and customizable look and feel of the browser interface with custom Themes and more.
– Keyboard Shortcuts and Mouse Gestures for quick browser commands.

Running on Raspberry Pi, Vivaldi lets users optimize settings to boost overall performance. To reduce resource usage, they can turn off animated GIFs or use the advanced Reader View for a clutter-free reading environment. Vivaldi also has built-in functionality such as tab grouping, screenshot capture, ability to take notes right in the browser and so on – in combination, resulting in a speedy browsing experience.

The Vivaldi web browser is available to download free of charge and more information and download links are available from the official Vivaldi website which is accessible by following the link below.

Source: VB

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Google is Making a Computer Vision Kit for Raspberry Pi

Computer vision promises to revolutionize everything from smartphone security to document scanning, but the concepts aren’t the easiest to wrap your head around. To help budding data scientists get experimenting, Google, one of the field’s foremost authorities, is releasing a machine learning development kit for computer vision. Google says it’s the first device to bring offline, on-device neural network acceleration to consumers.

Google’s AIY Vision Kit, which will be available for purchase later this month, comes with most (but not all) of what you need to get programming. It includes a circuit board, a computer vision kit software, a speaker, RGB lights, and a cardboard box to house all of the hardware. Unfortunately, you’ll have to buy the camera — specifically the Raspberry Pi Camera, which is designed to play nicely with the Raspberry Pi’s hardware — separately.

85c90_Capture Google is Making a Computer Vision Kit for Raspberry Pi

The kit uses a VisionBonnet board for Raspberry Pi, a low-power visual processing unit powered by Google’s TensorFlow AI platform. And it ships with three pre-trained computer vision models: MobileNets, which recognizes up to a thousand common objects; a facial recognition and expression detection algorithm that distinguishes between people; and a pet-detecting model that picks out humans, cats, and dogs in the camera’s field of view.

Optionally, you can deploy your own TensorFlow models and retrain them, or use the AIY’s Python application programming interface (API) to customize parameters. If you’re in need of ideas, Google’s supplied a few suggestions:

  • Identify all kinds of plant and animal species
  • See when your dog is at the back door
  • See when your car left the driveway
  • See that your guests are delighted by your holiday decorations
  • See when your little brother comes into your room 

The kit is a build-it-yourself affair, and it’ll cost $45 when it ships on December 31.

It’s the second AIY kit to come out of Google’s machine learning labs, the first being the search giant’s AIY Voice Kit. It, much like the AIY Vision Kit, let hobbyists play with machine learning using a Raspberry Pi and a few extra components.

Looking to get started? Check out the Google Blog post down below.


Source: Google Blog

Google is making a computer vision kit for Raspberry Pi – The Verge

Google is offering a new way for Raspberry Pi tinkerers to use its AI tools. It just announced the AIY Vision Kit, which includes a new circuit board and computer vision software that buyers can pair with their own Raspberry Pi computer and camera. (There’s also a cute cardboard box included, along with some supplementary accessories.) The kit costs $44.99 and will ship through Micro Center on December 31st.

The AIY Vision Kit’s software includes three neural network models: one that recognizes a thousand common objects; one that recognizes faces and expressions; and a “a person, cat and dog detector.” Users can train their own models with Google’s TensorFlow machine learning software.

Google touts this as a cheap and simple computer vision system that doesn’t require access to cloud processing, because of the extra processing unit. It suggests several simple uses, including setting up cameras to detect your dog or car. But it also offers more interesting possibilities, like identifying plants and animals with the kit.

This is the second project released through Google’s AIY program, a partnership with Raspberry Pi’s creators. The first was called Voice HAT, and it added microphones that let users issue Google Assistant commands to Raspberry Pi-controlled devices.

Google is making a computer vision kit for Raspberry Pi

Google is offering a new way for Raspberry Pi tinkerers to use its AI tools. It just announced the AIY Vision Kit, which includes a new circuit board and computer vision software that buyers can pair with their own Raspberry Pi computer and camera. (There’s also a cute cardboard box included, along with some supplementary accessories.) The kit costs $44.99 and will ship through Micro Center on December 31st.

The AIY Vision Kit’s software includes three neural network models: one that recognizes a thousand common objects; one that recognizes faces and expressions; and a “a person, cat and dog detector.” Users can train their own models with Google’s TensorFlow machine learning software.

Google touts this as a cheap and simple computer vision system that doesn’t require access to cloud processing, because of the extra processing unit. It suggests several simple uses, including setting up cameras to detect your dog or car. But it also offers more interesting possibilities, like identifying plants and animals with the kit.

This is the second project released through Google’s AIY program, a partnership with Raspberry Pi’s creators. The first was called Voice HAT, and it added microphones that let users issue Google Assistant commands to Raspberry Pi-controlled devices.

First Renesas based Raspberry Pi clone runs Linux

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G23S” SBC runs Linux on a Renesas RZ/G1C, and offers -20 to 85°C support and expansion headers including a RPi-compatible 40-pin link.

iWave’s iW-RainboW-G23S is the first board we’ve seen to tap the Renesas RZ/G1C SoC, which debuted earlier this year. It’s also the first Renesas based SBC we’ve seen that features the increasingly ubiquitous Raspberry Pi 85 x 56mm footprint, layout, and RPi-compatible 40-pin expansion connector. The board is also notable for providing -20 to 85°C temperature support.

iW-RainboW-G23S
(click image to enlarge)

The SBC runs Linux on the single- or dual-core RZ/G1C, which runs at 1GHz. The power-efficient SoC integrates the relatively low-end, but still 3D capable, PowerVR SGX531 GPU.

The RZ/G1C SoC joins other similarly Yocto Project supported Renesas RZ/G SoCs such as the dual-core RZ/G1E and RZ/G1M with 1GHz Cortex-A7 and 1.5GHz Cortex-A15 cores, respectively. There’s also an RZ/G1N, which is almost identical to the RZ/G1M, and an octa-core RZ/G1H with 4x Cortex-A15 and 4x -A7 cores.

iWave has previously adopted the Renesas RZ/G1H and RZ-G1E with the Qseven 2.0 form-factor iW-RainboW-G21M-Q7 and SMARC compatible RZ/G1E SMARC computer-on-modules, respectively. Both are available with carrier boards. The RZ-G1E also forms the basis of its SODIMM-style iW-RainboW-G22M-SM COM, which is sold as an SBC when paired with a Pico-ITX form factor carrier board. However, the new iW-RainboW-G23S is the first monolithic iWave SBC to use a Renesas processor.

iW-RainboW-G23S block diagram
(click image to enlarge)

The iW-RainboW-G23S supports up to 2GB DDR3 and 8GB or more of eMMC, plus a microSD slot and SPI flash. The SBC is not a true RPi clone, as it only has 2x USB 2.0 host ports instead of four, and the Ethernet port is Gigabit instead of 10/100Mbps. A micro-USB port and HDMI port are also supplied, along with a CVBS input jack and optional CVBS output.

Almost all other interfaces travel through one of three expansion headers. In addition to the Raspberry Pi compatible header, there’s a second 40-pin header that includes higher speed I/Os like LVDS, Parallel camera, and CAN. A third 20-pin connector includes serial debug and other interfaces.

Specifications listed for the iW-RainboW-G23S include:

  • Processor — Renesas RZ/G1C (1x or 2x Cortex-A7 cores @ 1GHz); PowerVR SGX531 GPU
  • Memory/storage:
    • 512MB to 2GB DDR3 RAM
    • 8GB (expandable) eMMC
    • 2MB (expandable) SPI flash
    • MicroSD slot
  • Networking — Gigabit Ethernet port
  • Display and media I/O:
    • HDMI port
    • CVBS video input jack
    • Optional CVBS output jack or header
  • Other I/O:
    • 2x USB 2.0 host ports
    • Micro-USB OTG port
    • JTAG, SPI
  • Expansion:
    • Raspberry Pi compatible 40-pin interface (UART, SPI, 2x I2C, 17x GPIO)
    • 2nd 40-pin (non-RPi) connector — 3x UART (2x with CTS RTS) CAN, I2C, PWM, LVDS, Parallel camera, 2x I2S audio
    • 20-pin interface — Debug UART, UART/I2C, PWM
  • Other features — RTC with optional coin-cell battery; reset switch
  • Power — 5V, 2A input with optional lockable input header
  • Operating temperature — -20 to 85°C
  • Dimensions — 85 x 56mm
  • Operating system — Linux 3.10.31

 
Further information

The iW-RainboW-G23S appears to be available now at an undisclosed price. More information may be found at iWave’s iW-RainboW-G23S product page.
 

LibreELEC 8.2.0 Kodi-focused Linux distro is here, but Raspberry Pi versions are pulled

080de_LibreELEC_Cat LibreELEC 8.2.0 Kodi-focused Linux distro is here, but Raspberry Pi versions are pulled

While many folks prefer to leverage legal streaming services like Netflix on hardware such as Apple TV and Roku nowadays, other people still prefer accessing locally stored media files. Is that concept dying? Yeah, but it will be a while before it is dead completely. Not to mention, music and movie pirates will keep locally stored downloaded media content alive for quite some time.

Don’t get me wrong, not everyone that watches locally stored media files are pirates, but some certainly are. Whether you are accessing downloaded media or streaming content using an addon, the Kodi media center is a great way to experience it. Taking it a step further, a Linux-based operating system that exists just to serve Kodi is even better. Today, one of the best such distros, LibreELEC, gets a major update to version 8.2.0.

“LibreELEC 8.2.0 provides a mid-year bump to improve hardware support on Intel and Raspberry Pi hardware. It also resolves minor support issues on a range of devices and fixes a number of important security issues affecting the core OS reported in recent months. Kodi is bumped to 17.5, and Samba bumps to 4.6 which brings support for SMB2/3 to LibreELEC for the first time,” says The LibreELEC team.

ALSO READ: Warning: Kodi could be spying on you — secret addition looks for ‘infringing’ add-ons and warns you to remove them

Unfortunately, some Raspberry Pi bugs were discovered after release. As a result, the images for that hardware have been pulled. The team explains, “An issue with HEVC playback on Raspberry Pi and Slice hardware has been found after release so update files have been removed while we investigate the fix.”

The LibreELEC team shares the following changes found in 8.2.0

  • Fix boot-time overwrite of samba.conf.sample to ensure v4 template exists
  • Fix Samba startup failures by detecting/disabling old (v3) samba.conf files
  • Fix NAND install on WeTek Hub/Play 2 after Android Marshmallow updates
  • Fix VMware OVF template, drop OVA .img suffix and force ‘installer’ mode
  • Fix an issue in the embedded getedid script
  • Fix Kodi to support 352KHz and 384KHz audio over S/PDIF
  • Fix clearing of core files from /storage/.cache during Kodi startup
  • Fix vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000250 aka Blueborne pt.1) in BlueZ
  • Fix vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000251 aka Blueborne pt.2) in all kernels except Amlogic 3.10
  • Fix a Python /dev/random issue that caused some Python crypto functions to error
  • Fix to prevent boot-loops when a failed update leaves valid files in /storage/.update
  • Update Amlogic 3.14 kernel to use kernel wireless-regdb on all reference devices
  • Update RPi firmware to solve minor CEC button press issues
  • Update RPi wifi firmware to resolve CVE-2017-9417 (Broadpwn)
  • Update wpa_supplicant to resolve multiple CVE’s (KRACK)
  • Update linux-firmware and misc-firmware packages
  • Update nvidia-legacy driver to 340.104
  • Update nvidia main driver to 384.90
  • Update RTL8192EU driver
  • Update RTL8188EU driver
  • Update RPi kernel to 4.9.43
  • Update Generic kernel to 4.11.8
  • Update from LibreSSL to OpenSSL
  • Update Samba to 4.6.8
  • Update to lirc 0.9.4d
  • Update Kodi to 17.5.1
  • Update kernel to enable SMB2 support (default) and where possible SMB3
  • Update LibreELEC settings add-on to expose more Samba config options
  • Revert Hauppauge DualHD tuner support (back to single-tuner, which works)
  • Add Slice and Slice3 projects
  • Add (merge) Virtual project into Generic
  • Add buildsystem changes to make backports from master easier
  • Add support for the Xiaomi Mi Box Bluetooth remote
  • Add support for Xbox ONE (DVB-C/T/T2) USB tuner
  • Add alsa configuration for the IQAudIO Digi+ on Raspberry Pi devices
  • Add dummy Tvheadend 4.0 add-on to ensure 4.0 is disabled on upgrade

Ready to download? You can use the links below. As previously mentioned, the Raspberry Pi images have been pulled due to bugs. Hopefully they will be fixed and re-uploaded very soon.

New installations using the LibreELEC USB-SD Creator app

LibreELEC.USB-SD.Creator.Linux-32bit.bin (info)
LibreELEC.USB-SD.Creator.Linux-64bit.bin (info)
LibreELEC.USB-SD.Creator.macOS.dmg (info)
LibreELEC.USB-SD.Creator.Win32.exe (info)

New installation using 3rd party USB or SD writer apps (.img.gz)

LibreELEC-Generic.x86_64-8.2.0.img.gz (info)

LibreELEC-imx6.arm-8.2.0.img.gz (info)
LibreELEC-Odroid_C2.aarch64-8.2.0.img.gz (info)
LibreELEC-WeTek_Play.arm-8.2.0.img.gz (info)
LibreELEC-WeTek_Core.arm-8.2.0.img.gz (info)
LibreELEC-WeTek_Hub.aarch64-8.2.0.img.gz (info)
LibreELEC-WeTek_Play_2.aarch64-8.2.0.img.gz (info)

New Install to WeTek internal NAND (.zip)

LibreELEC-WeTek_Play.arm-8.2.0.zip (info)
LibreELEC-WeTek_Core.arm-8.2.0.zip (info)
LibreELEC-WeTek_Hub.aarch64-8.2.0.zip (info)
LibreELEC-WeTek_Play_2.aarch64-8.2.0.zip (info)

Manual Update from LibreELEC 7.0, 8.0, or OpenELEC (.tar)

LibreELEC-Generic.x86_64-8.2.0.tar (info)

LibreELEC-imx6.arm-8.2.0.tar (info)
LibreELEC-Odroid_C2.aarch64-8.2.0.tar (info)
LibreELEC-WeTek_Play.arm-8.2.0.tar (info)
LibreELEC-WeTek_Core.arm-8.2.0.tar (info)
LibreELEC-WeTek_Hub.arm-8.2.0.tar (info)
LibreELEC-WeTek_Play_2.arm-8.2.0.tar (info)

Pi-Top: This Raspberry Pi And Linux-powered Laptop Is For New …

In late 2014, Pi-Top, U.K.’s education startup raised about $200,000 on Indiegogo to fund its first DIY laptop. It was followed by pi-topCEED, a cheap desktop computer that’s powered by Raspberry Pi.

Their latest offering, the new Pi-Top, is a new tinkering machine that you can assemble on your own using modular approach. Compared to the past offerings, the number of steps needed to assemble the computer and start working are much less.

It comes with a new sliding keyboard design that reveals the built-in Modular Rail. There, you can store your accessories, electronic parts, etc. This is also the spot where Raspberry Pi is placed.

dfb73_pi-top-laptop-modular Pi-Top: This Raspberry Pi And Linux-powered Laptop Is For New ...

It comes with an “inventor’s kit,” which is basically a selected collection of electronic components to help you build a wide range of hardware DIY projects.

According to TechCrunch, the software also includes a step-by-step manual that navigates one through different guides.

Its major tech specifications are as follows:

  • 14” full-HD LCD, 1920×1080 resolution
  • 1.2 GHz quad-core ARM Cortex A53P
  • 4 USB ports, 40 GPIO pins
  • HDMI, ethernet port
  • 802.11 B/G/N wireless LAN, Bluetooth 4.1
  • 6-8 hour battery life
  • MicroSD card slot
  • 8GB class 10 SD CARD with pi-topOS included

dfb73_pi-top-laptop-modular Pi-Top: This Raspberry Pi And Linux-powered Laptop Is For New ...

Talking about the operating system, the Pi-Top laptop runs a custom operating system named Pi-TopOS Polaris, which is built on Raspberry Pi’s official Raspbian Linux distro. The OS ships with all the basic software, including Gmail, LibreOffice, YouTube, Chromium, Minecraft Pi Edition, etc.

Talking about the cost, the new Pi-Top ships with a price tag of $320. In case you have your own Pi, you can cut that cost and get it for $285. Moreover, you can keep replacing the Raspberry Pi board with newer editions and keep increasing the power of your laptop.

What are your views about Pi-Top DIY laptop? Don’t forget to share your views with us.

Also Read: 15 Top Programming Languages Used By Coders On GitHub

Pi-Top: This Raspberry Pi And Linux-powered Laptop Is For New Coders And Makers

In late 2014, Pi-Top, U.K.’s education startup raised about $200,000 on Indiegogo to fund its first DIY laptop. It was followed by pi-topCEED, a cheap desktop computer that’s powered by Raspberry Pi.

Their latest offering, the new Pi-Top, is a new tinkering machine that you can assemble on your own using modular approach. Compared to the past, the number of steps needed to assemble the computer and start working are much less.

It comes with a new sliding keyboard design that reveals the built-in Modular Rail. There, you can store your accessories, electronic parts, etc. This is also the spot when Raspberry Pi is placed.

479da_pi-top-laptop-modular Pi-Top: This Raspberry Pi And Linux-powered Laptop Is For New Coders And Makers

It comes with an “inventor’s kit,” which is basically a selected collection of electronic components to help you build a wide range of hardware DIY projects.

According to TechCrunch, the software also includes a step-by-step manual that navigates one through different guides.

Its major tech specifications are as follows:

  • 14” full-HD LCD, 1920×1080 resolution
  • 1.2 GHz quad-core ARM Cortex A53P
  • 4 USB ports, 40 GPIO pins
  • HDMI, ethernet port
  • 802.11 B/G/N wireless LAN, Bluetooth 4.1
  • 6-8 hour battery life
  • MicroSD card slot
  • 8GB class 10 SD CARD with pi-topOS included

479da_pi-top-laptop-modular Pi-Top: This Raspberry Pi And Linux-powered Laptop Is For New Coders And Makers

Talking about the operating system, the Pi-Top laptop runs a custom operating system named Pi-TopOS Polaris, which is built on Raspberry Pi’s official Raspbian Linux distro. The OS ships with all the basic software, including Gmail, LibreOffice, YouTube, Chromium, Minecraft Pi Edition, etc.

Talking about the cost, the new Pi-Top ships with a price tag of $320. In case you have your own Pi, you can cut that cost and get it for $285. Moreover, you can keep replacing the Raspberry Pi board with newer editions and keep increasing the power of your laptop.

What are your views about Pi-Top DIY laptop? Don’t forget to share your views with us.

Also Read: 15 Top Programming Languages Used By Coders On GitHub

Raspberry Pi laptop lets kids get inside their computer – CNET

95fe6_pi-top Raspberry Pi laptop lets kids get inside their computer - CNET

The pi-top lets you slide down the keyboard and look inside. 


pi-top

There’s a new kids laptop on the scene.

Education technology company pi-top launched a modular laptop using Raspberry Pi, a low cost, credit card-size circuit board. The idea is this new pi-top laptop lets you monkey around with the machine’s guts as the keyboard slides off. It comes with an inventor’s kit with components to complete projects relating to topics like music and space. It also has some different apps with an educational bent, like Minecraft for Pi.

“We’re offering learning beyond the screen and keyboard, enabling wider exploration of computer science and basic electronics, ensuring that young learners have the opportunity to be inspired by a world of STEAM-based learning,” said pi-top CEO Jesse Lozano in a statement.

Pi-top is available Friday.

95fe6_pi-top Raspberry Pi laptop lets kids get inside their computer - CNET




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