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Here’s why OnePlus doesn’t support Project Treble — yet

69e99_oneplus-5t-review-8-of-14-840x473 Here's why OnePlus doesn't support Project Treble — yet


Updates have always been a subject of hot debate within the Android community. Some OEMs deliver OS updates in a timely manner, and others, not so much. Google has a plan to help with that, and that plan is Project Treble.

The goal of Project Treble is simple really, and it is to make updates faster and easier for device manufacturers. In theory, this should help with platform fragmentation, but some devices aren’t able to reap the benefits.

Some such devices are the OnePlus 3/3T and 5/5T. After a lot of confusion from users, a OnePlus employee under the handle “OmegaHsu” made a forum post explaining why the devices in question will not have support for Project Treble. The reason? To prevent bricked devices.

The way Project Treble works is by separating manufacturer code from the operating system itself, which requires having multiple partitions on the device.

OmegaHsu explains:

However, because partitions were not required of Android N and previous versions of Android, all of our current devices do not feature a partition. According to our tests, if we were to modify the partition layout via OTA there is a risk that devices will brick during the partitioning.

OnePlus’ reasoning seems sound, they have to weigh the pros and cons of any large changes, and in this case, the danger of bricking outweighs the benefit of quicker updates. Even without Project Treble, OnePlus believes that they can still quickly and efficiently release Android updates. As a manufacturer, they have a duty to not cause unnecessary system-breaking bugs, and they are avoiding that risk by not supporting Treble in the short-term. While it’s a downer for current device owners, the good news is that most, if not all, 2018 smartphones should support Project Treble by shipping with Android Oreo and the new partition scheme.

Read: First OxygenOS Open Beta with Android Oreo arrives for OnePlus 5

What are your thoughts on Project Treble and OnePlus’ decision not to support it on current models? Let us know in the comments section below.

This is Why Nokia Android Phones DON’T Support Project Treble

Google’s Project Treble was designed as a way to mitigate the problems of Android fragmentation going forwards. However, the initial seeding phase of the initiative has seen some teething pains, and Nokia’s current run of Android phones are not immune.

Project Treble, at its core, is pretty straightforward: it separates the core Android OS framework (Google’s bit) from the vendor’s )the phone maker’s) customization so that updates can be pushed through to the phone OTA without the vendor needing to modify it.

This way, whenever a new update is ready, phones rocking Treble would receive the update OTA without the maker of the phone – LG, Samsung, Huawei, HTC – having to lift a finger. On paper, and in the future, it is a brilliant plan to solve the issue of Android fragmentation that plagues millions of devices in circulation.

However, in order for Treble to do its work, it needs to be up and running on the phone before it is shipped to the customer – and it is here where some brands are running into trouble. Over time this will not be an issue, as all Android phones should ship with it, but for now, there is a bit of catch-up going on.

And HMD’s Nokia brand is firmly in the “catch-up” camp, confirming that none of its current-generation Nokia Android phones will support Treble. Nokia says Treble cannot be retrofitted on a handset after it has shipped… but this isn’t entirely true.

Huawei, for instance, has confirmed that it will bring Treble to its older phones during the latter part of 2017, indicating that Nokia might just be telling porkies about not being able to install Treble on older handsets.

Huawei also confirmed, during its Note 10 launch, that it has been working closely with Google on getting Android P better integrated with its Kirin chipset. The company, which is fast becoming one of the biggest players on the planet, is keen to usurp Samsung as the king of the Android space and is working closely with Google to achieve this.

Perhaps Nokia should drop Huawei an email and find out how it’s retrofitting Treble on older Android handsets. I’m sure its punters would appreciate it!

Tax director resigns as $60M computer upgrade project falters …

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) –

The head of the state Tax Department has resigned amid ongoing concerns over a beleaguered $60 million project to modernize the state’s outdated tax collection and filing computer systems.

Maria Zielinksi told Tax Department employees in an email Tuesday that today was her last day and she planned to move to Maui.

“While there are likely to be some hurtles and bumps along the road in the coming year, I believe you will all endure and be stronger from it,” she wrote.

No immediate comment from the Governor. A spokesperson says he’s traveling and is expected to answer questions about this Wednesday.

The resignation comes as Tax Department employees and their union are raising red flags about the modernization project.

The project is being managed by the state’s Chief Information Officer, Todd Nacapuy, and Deputy state Tax Director Damien Elefante.

In a letter last month, HGEA Executive Director Randy Perreira complained to Gov. David Ige about the shift in the project’s management shift from Zielinksi and IT Manager Robert Su and asked to restore their control.

He wrote, “There is a complete lack of confidence in the project leadership of the DoTax deputy director and the state’s chief information officer.”

He added, “Employees are compelled to voice their concerns because they are loathe to bear responsibility to the system’s inevitable failure, under current leadership, and the catastrophic effects it will bring.”

Meanwhile, the governor’s office has pledged to take a serious look at the project, which affects thousands of taxpayers and $2 billion in personal income taxes.

The state is under intense pressure to get the new system finished on time.

The income tax portion of the system is supposed to be done by the end of next year and workers predict major problems for taxpayers in 2019 if the issues aren’t fixed.

Several spoke anonymously to Hawaii News Now, citing fears over losing their jobs if they identified themselves. They claim mismanagement, retaliation, and a lack of knowledge transfer as the new system is set up.

“If this project does not reach completion, we are in disaster of losing hundreds and hundreds of taxpayer information because our hardware could fail,” said one worker.

Perreira, of the Hawaii Government Employees Association, said he’s worried that “nobody is paying attention to these tax employees and at the end of the day a lot of taxpayer dollars could be wasted.”

An independent consultant’s report called the tax system modernization’s governance, management support and communication “severely challenged” and “somewhat dysfunctional.”

Ford Fuchigami, Ige’s administrative director, said before Zielinksi’s resignation Tuesday that he wasn’t planning any management changes, but he is investigating concerns. 

“I’m very concerned. We don’t take this thing lightly,” he said.

He added that the project still needs $16 million from the state Legislature, and everyone agrees the need to modernize the state’s outdated computer system’s is critical.

Copyright 2017 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved

Tax director resigns as $60M computer upgrade project falters

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) –

The head of the state Tax Department has resigned amid ongoing concerns over a beleaguered $60 million project to modernize the state’s outdated tax collection and filing computer systems.

Maria Zielinksi told Tax Department employees in an email Tuesday that today was her last day and she planned to move to Maui.

“While there are likely to be some hurtles and bumps along the road in the coming year, I believe you will all endure and be stronger from it,” she wrote.

No immediate comment from the Governor. A spokesperson says he’s traveling and is expected to answer questions about this Wednesday.

The resignation comes as Tax Department employees and their union are raising red flags about the modernization project.

The project is being managed by the state’s Chief Information Officer, Todd Nacapuy, and Deputy state Tax Director Damien Elefante.

In a letter last month, HGEA Executive Director Randy Perreira complained to Gov. David Ige about the shift in the project’s management shift from Zielinksi and IT Manager Robert Su and asked to restore their control.

He wrote, “There is a complete lack of confidence in the project leadership of the DoTax deputy director and the state’s chief information officer.”

He added, “Employees are compelled to voice their concerns because they are loathe to bear responsibility to the system’s inevitable failure, under current leadership, and the catastrophic effects it will bring.”

Meanwhile, the governor’s office has pledged to take a serious look at the project, which affects thousands of taxpayers and $2 billion in personal income taxes.

The state is under intense pressure to get the new system finished on time.

The income tax portion of the system is supposed to be done by the end of next year and workers predict major problems for taxpayers in 2019 if the issues aren’t fixed.

Several spoke anonymously to Hawaii News Now, citing fears over losing their jobs if they identified themselves. They claim mismanagement, retaliation, and a lack of knowledge transfer as the new system is set up.

“If this project does not reach completion, we are in disaster of losing hundreds and hundreds of taxpayer information because our hardware could fail,” said one worker.

Perreira, of the Hawaii Government Employees Association, said he’s worried that “nobody is paying attention to these tax employees and at the end of the day a lot of taxpayer dollars could be wasted.”

An independent consultant’s report called the tax system modernization’s governance, management support and communication “severely challenged” and “somewhat dysfunctional.”

Ford Fuchigami, Ige’s administrative director, said before Zielinksi’s resignation Tuesday that he wasn’t planning any management changes, but he is investigating concerns. 

“I’m very concerned. We don’t take this thing lightly,” he said.

He added that the project still needs $16 million from the state Legislature, and everyone agrees the need to modernize the state’s outdated computer system’s is critical.

Copyright 2017 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved

The OpenChain Project: From A to Community

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BCDA and DICT Philippines partnering with Facebook for high-speed Internet infrastructure project

The Department of Information and Communications Technology,
Philippines (DICT) and the Bases Conversion and Development Authority (BCDA) launched
the Luzon Bypass Infrastructure project on November 15 to build an ultra-high speed
information highway that will greatly improve the speed, affordability and
accessibility of broadband Internet throughout the country. It is expected to
be online at the end of 2019.

DICT holds responsibility for planning, developing, and
promoting the national ICT development agenda, while BCDA is a state-owned
enterprise that is focused on developing former military assets, land assets in
particular, into new centres for growth (Click
here
for OpenGov Interview with Vivencio B. Dizon, President and CEO of BCDA from
May 2017.
)

Luzon is the largest and most populous island in the
Philippines. It is the economic and political centre of the nation, being home
to the country’s capital city, Manila, as well as Quezon City, the country’s
most populous city. The press release states that the Luzon Strait has a history
of multiple simultaneous submarine cable breaks. The Luzon Bypass
Infrastructure provides a terrestrial bypass route for international submarine
cable owners seeking diversity from the Luzon Strait. BCDA will build the Luzon
Bypass Infrastructure, consisting of two cable landing stations connected by a
250-km long cable network corridor.

DICT will operate the Luzon Bypass Infrastructure, maintain
the related facilities and provide last mile connectivity in the Philippines.

Collaboration with
Facebook

Facebook will the first party to utilise the Infrastructure
and will construct and operate a submarine cable system that will land in the
cable stations on the East and West Coasts of Luzon. The cable will provide
direct connections from Luzon to Internet hubs in the United States and Asia.

In exchange for utilising the bypass infrastructure,
Facebook will provide the Philippine Government with spectrum equivalent to at
least 2 million Mbps, significantly expanding the capacity available for the
Government’s connectivity programs.

Faster, cheaper
Internet among priority areas for Government

Faster and cheaper Internet is among the solutions being
pushed by the current national administration as part of the 0+10 point agenda of the President, which includes
priority programs to alleviate poverty, spur inclusive growth and development,
and create jobs throughout the country.

Currently, Philippines has one of the slowest and most
expensive Internet markets in the region. Earlier this year, DICT released
a National Broadband Plan to accelerate the deployment of fiber optics cables
and wireless technologies to improve Internet speed, following a working
draft
released in March. The Plan
includes the establishment of the Philippine Integrated Infostructure (PhII), consisting
of international submarine cable landing stations, national government
backbone, and the last mile access network.

In line with that, this new broadband infrastructure is expected
to significantly improve Internet speed and increase availability throughout
the country to support the DICT’s flagship programmes to deliver
free Wi-FI in public places
nationwide, as well as online government
services including for education and health.

Properties being developed by the BCDA, such as Clark and
New Clark City, stand to benefit greatly from this project. New Clark City will be the country’s
first smart, green and disaster-resilient metropolis that is envisioned to be
one of the most liveable cities in the region.

Understanding Project Treble and future Android updates

bb7e1_Software-Update-840x490 Understanding Project Treble and future Android updates

The most common complaint about Android updates is that they are notoriously slow to release. Worse still, handset support is promptly re-evaluated once new models come along. Consumers have been complaining about this problem to OEMs and Google for years. The situation finally looks set to change with the arrival of Project Treble.

Project Treble is included as part of Android 8.0 Oreo and represents a major re-architecture for the OS framework. The initiative’s ultimate aim is to make updates faster and easier for OEMs to roll out to devices. Treble is arguably one of the biggest changes introduced to Android Oreo, but one that consumers won’t even notice as it works primarily behind the scenes. Here’s how it will affect the future of Android.

How Oreo is better than Nougat

Why the need for Project Treble?

In a word: fragmentation. It’s a criticism of Android that industry followers will be very familiar with, and it’s not unfounded. While iPhones receive major OS updates for three or four years, the most expensive Android smartphones are lucky to receive two, and lower cost models may never see an upgrade at all. Missing out on the latest features is unfortunate, but it’s the lack of security and increasing vulnerability of these older devices that is the real worry. Not just for users, but for Google also.

It’s the lack of security and increasing vulnerability of unsupported older devices that is the real worry

As smartphones take on an increasingly important role in using and securing our personal, financial, and otherwise important data, fixing security vulnerabilities is of utmost importance. As much flak as OEMs take for being slow with updates, there is a deeper reason for these delays that has, until now, made it difficult and expensive to support devices in the long term.

bb7e1_Software-Update-840x490 Understanding Project Treble and future Android updates

The core idea of Project Treble is to remove the requirement to rework vendor implementations, allowing the OS layer to be updated independently.

The slow update problem has to do with the way that Android software layers communicate with underlying phone hardware. In order for applications to run on a CPU or use a camera, the OS has to talk to connected hardware via a hardware abstraction layer (HAL). This is important if, for example, you want third party apps from the Play Store to work with any phone’s camera – HALs are designed to be low-level driver-agnostic. Below this is the Linux kernel, which handles the hardware specific communication between the HAL and the exact components in the phone. It has to be compiled depending on your handset’s specific hardware.

The problem with Nougat and older version of Android, is that there’s no separation between the vendor’s low level hardware code and the higher level AOSP operating system code that Google maintains. In Android 7.x and earlier, no formal vendor interfaces existed, meaning that device manufacturers had to update large portions of the Android code with each update. This includes waiting on hardware vendors, such as SoC manufacturers, to provide their code to hook hardware into the new OS.

Unfortunately, Android didn’t used to have much in the way of plug-and-play compatibility with low level hardware; code had to be heavily tailored. This takes a considerable amount of time, testing, and cost on the part of silicon vendors and OEMs. Project Treble is designed to solve this problem by separating the Android OS Framework from the vendor hardware code implementations, therefore allowing Google and OEMs to update the OS without having to reconfigure all the the lower level hardware parts.

Project Treble separates the Android OS Framework from the vendor hardware code implementations

OEMs will still want to introduce their own proprietary hardware and software features, which will add to development and testing time. And OEMs will still have to take extra time incorporating their unique features into the AOSP from Google after Project Treble’s introduction. Treble simply reduces the amount of work that needs to be done by third parties, particularly SoC vendors who provide much of the hardware code.

How new updates will work

It’s important to reiterate that Android uses the Linux kernel under the hood. A kernel is the part of an operating system which handles input/output and computer instructions from the application layer, essentially allowing the application software to communicate with the hardware. To make changes to the way Android handles this communication is to make some notable changes to the way the Linux kernel operates.

Linux kernel long term support extended to 6 years for Project Treble

To solve the hardware abstraction layer issue, Android O formalized the division between hardware sub systems like audio or camera, and their clients on the software side. These new formal divisions specify the interface between a HAL and its users. There are now around 60 formal interfaces for various hardware components, known as HIDLs.

The goal of a HIDL is to allow the framework to be replaced without having to rebuild HALs. HALs will be built by vendors or SoC makers and put in a /vendor partition on the device, enabling the framework, in its own partition, to be replaced with an over-the-air update (OTA) without recompiling the HALs. To update devices running earlier versions of Android to Android O, developers can wrap both conventional and legacy HALs in a new HIDL interface too.

Linux kernel support has recently been extended from 2 to 6 years for Project Treble

Equally as important, Linux kernel long term support has recently been extended from 2 to 6 years for Project Treble. This means that major fixes to the kernel are no longer missed over a device’s longer term life cycle. Previously a device would at best see a year’s worth of support left by the time it hit the market.

bb7e1_Software-Update-840x490 Understanding Project Treble and future Android updates

bb7e1_Software-Update-840x490 Understanding Project Treble and future Android updates

As you can see, the switch to Project Treble requires a little bit of work on the hardware vendor side too, as the way the vendor implementation is programmed to expose the hardware to Android is different to previous OS versions. Once this revised vendor implementation is on the device though, manufacturers can choose to deliver a new Android release to consumers by just updating the Android OS framework, without any reworking required from the silicon manufacturers.

Phones updating to Oreo from Nougat won’t necessarily be Treble compliant though

An interesting note in Google’s documentation is that “Project Treble will be coming to all new devices launched with Android O and beyond.” This implies phones coming to Oreo from Nougat won’t necessarily be Treble compliant. We’ve already seen that this is true with the unveiling of the OnePlus 5T, a phone that ships with Nougat and that won’t be seeing Treble with its eventual update to Oreo. Meanwhile, the original Pixels do support Treble, following their update to Oreo.

Here’s how Project Treble will improve security in Android

Devices shipping with Oreo out-of-the-box have to fully support Treble, as OEMs will be coding the vendor implementation in this way from the get-go and are now obliged to have a working version of AOSP on their hardware. As of Android 8.0, the new vendor interface is validated by a Vendor Test Suite (VTS), to ensure that the updated OS is compatible with the existing hardware setup.

Project Treble doesn’t necessarily mean that all handsets will see updates instantaneously, as Google is not handling them directly

Project Treble doesn’t necessarily mean that all handsets will see updates instantaneously, as Google is not handling them directly. OEMs are still free to tweak and skin the OS, as well as embed their own software into the Android OS release. So there’s still going to be some time taken for OEMs to build and test their own particular take on Android. However, by taking silicon vendors out of the equation, these updates should still be faster and software should be much easier to apply across numerous devices.

bb7e1_Software-Update-840x490 Understanding Project Treble and future Android updates

Implications of Project Treble

From a user perspective, OS updates will be delivered in exactly the same way as they are now. Vendors will still be able to push OTA updates, which you can download at leisure in the background without having to do anything more than tap a prompt. Hopefully we’ll end up seeing them appear a little quicker than before and for longer into a device’s lifetime.

Project Treble has some interesting implications for the revival of the custom ROM scene too, as there’s likely to be less work required to get software and hardware playing nicely. It could take just days, rather than weeks or months, to port AOSP to a device that supports Treble. XDA community members are already excited about the prospects. Developer OldDroid went as far as to call this a breakthrough, after booting Oreo on the Mate 9, which hadn’t even seen a single custom Nougat ROM. Other developers have also already shown off a single system image capable of booting on different devices with different processors.

For custom ROM fans, a single system image is now capable of booting on different devices with different processors

The prospect is that we may be edging closer to a time where Android software can be easily ported across a range of devices, much like how Windows can run on a huge range of hardware configurations with minimal effort. But that’s not the goal of Treble at the moment.

bb7e1_Software-Update-840x490 Understanding Project Treble and future Android updates

With Project Treble, Android is moving closer to Google’s idealized world of more frequent and longer running updates.

Closing thoughts

Project Treble sounds very promising, but it’s important to understand that it has limitations. First, this isn’t Google taking over updates. Product manufacturers like Samsung, Huawei, and LG are still responsible for compiling and rolling out updates, and they won’t be anywhere near as fast as Google is with the Pixels. Treble is instead an OS structure optimization designed to speed up rollouts from manufacturers. Google has done its part, now it is up to the OEMs.

Second, only handsets with Android 8.0 Oreo or newer out of the box must support Project Treble. Phones that upgrade to Oreo from Nougat don’t have to fully support Treble, though OEMs can choose to if they wish. We’ll have to pay close attention to which manufacturers say what as they roll out their Oreo upgrades. It’s also unlikely that custom ROMs will be able to introduce Treble to many older devices, as lower level hardware access isn’t open source.

If you’re looking for a phone with Treble support now, currently Google’s Pixel series, the Essential Phone, and Huawei’s Mate 9, Mate 10, Honor 9, and Honor 8 Pro are your options. It’s not yet clear which other OEMs plan to support Treble on their existing handsets. Of course, next year’s flagships with Oreo installed will all ship will full support for faster updates out of the box. And that, my friends, will be a great thing for Android.

WireGuard, a Revolutionary VPN Project, Adds Support for Android ROMs

It’s hard to imagine the modern Internet without a VPN. For many years, VPNs have extended private networks across public networks, enabling users to send and receive data across shared or public networks as if their computing devices were directly connected to the private network. This consequently has had the effect of allowing users to bypass particular geographical restrictions as well as to keep data secure. The VPN software landscape, however, has had a myriad of problems, which WireGuard, a new secure tunneling protocol, aims to address.


OpenVPN, IPsec, and their problems

Today’s well-known VPN solutions on Android are OpenVPN and IPsec, but they are not without problems. The popularity of OpenVPN sort of makes sense as it is easier to configure than IPsec and has been around for a long time. While the project is a somewhat acceptable solution for most users, its complexity is overwhelming. OpenVPN consists of around 120,000 lines of code. Such amount of code makes the project almost impossible to audit and secure, as witnessed by the massive trail of security bugs over the last few years. OpenVPN also lives in userspace, making it quite slow, since every packet must be copied several times and incur several context switches. IPsec, IKEv2, L2TP, PPTP, and related 90s technologies are also quite popular, but similarly problematic, being large bulky codebases — StrongSwan is around 430,000 lines of code, in addition, the entire kernel XFRM layer — and based on outdated 90s cryptographic wisdom. The ordinary use of these protocols is also very “chatty,” sending traffic unnecessarily, resulting in reduced battery life on laptops and mobile phones.

e6aba_WireGuard-VPN-1024x767 WireGuard, a Revolutionary VPN Project, Adds Support for Android ROMs


An Exciting New VPN Project: WireGuard

Recently we had the pleasure to talk to one of our Recognized Developers, zx2c4. In real life, he is Jason Donenfeld and is an author of WireGuard, a next-generation VPN tunnel, that may soon dethrone OpenVPN and IPsec. Launched in 2015, WireGuard offers cutting edge cryptography, is easier to audit since it is less than 4,000 lines of code, and is quite easy to use.

WireGuard is a novel VPN that runs inside the Linux Kernel and utilizes state-of-the-art cryptography. It aims to be faster, simpler, leaner, and more useful than IPSec, while avoiding the massive headache. It intends to be considerably more performant than OpenVPN. WireGuard is designed as a general purpose VPN for running on embedded interfaces and super computers alike, fit for many different circumstances. It runs over UDP.

The reception to WireGuard has been very positive, both inside the security community and inside the kernel community, with Greg KH, the stable maintainer of the Linux kernel, endorsing it after a thorough code review. It has been presented around the world, with the FOSDEM presentation being perhaps particularly relevant for XDA readers. The WireGuard white paper has been peer-reviewed by the academic community as well.

The protocol is very nice for mobile phones because it was developed as a “stealth VPN,” by default not sending any packets unless there is actual data to be sent. This has the effect of not draining the battery like other VPN clients commonly do. Additionally, WireGuard allows roaming freely between different IP addresses, meaning you can transition between WiFi and cellular connections, or between any other kinds of connections, without having to establish any connections; it’s entirely seamless.

The speed is best in class, offering SSSE3, AVX, AVX2, AVX512, and NEON-accelerated implementations of its ciphers. Its use of ChaCha20 means that it is extremely fast on nearly all hardware. In testing, WireGuard handily beats other protocols.

e6aba_WireGuard-VPN-1024x767 WireGuard, a Revolutionary VPN Project, Adds Support for Android ROMs

WireGuard is not only the fastest VPN on the block, but the cryptography has also been formally verified, which means there are mathematical proofs that its cryptographic constructs are secure in the symbolic model. While the cryptography is modern it is also conservative, erring on the side of paranoia rather than the side of frivolousness. That combined with its tiny and easily auditable code base make WireGuard very reliable from a security perspective.


WireGuard and Android Support

While WireGuard is primarily developed as an optimized kernel module for Linux, there is a userspace portable version in the works, so that it can be distributed in apps in the Play Store without needing root access. However, while the userspace implementation is still faster than the competition, much of the WireGuard magic shines when the native kernel module is used. For this reason, the primary interest of WireGuard to the XDA development community lies in integrating the kernel module into ROMs directly.

WireGuard has already made its way into some ROMs, in fact. Most notably, it’s integrated into Sultanxda’s popular ROMs for the OnePlus 3/3T and other developers will surely follow. The patching procedure is quite simple and can be done with a few simple steps. The best place to find the reference is the android_kernel_wireguard git repository page as well as zx2c4’s XDA thread on adding it to ROMs.

The currently in development Android app uses the kernel module opportunistically, if it is available, and otherwise falls back to using the userspace implementation. The app has a GUI for defining VPN tunnels, checking status, and very nicely adds a toggle switch to the notification area to turn on and off tunnels. Below you can have a glimpse of the simple toggling interface of the early versions of the app.

The WireGuard development team is currently recruiting Android GUI developers to work alongside them as they make advances in the core technology. If any XDA developers are interested, they shouldn’t hesitate to reach out to zx2c4. The WireGuard project is completely open-source and transparent.

Overall, WireGuard appears to be the future of VPNs and secure network tunnels, embracing rock solid modern cryptography, a secure auditable code base, and an innovative protocol well suited for smartphones. Its usage on the Linux server and desktop is already highly regarded, marching solidly ahead into mainline Linux. We at XDA look forward to seeing WireGuard come to Android and our ROMs.

If you are eager to test out WireGuard on your device, contact your ROM developer or, re-compile the ROM on your own. You can also grab the alpha version of the application from the official thread or Google Play store.


Visit the WireGuard thread on XDA

Healthy Nevada Project: Improving health through genetics and big data – WBIR

To understand the factors that impact the health of the individuals we serve within our community, we have to look outside the walls of the hospital.

At Renown Health in Reno, Nev., we recognize that to significantly impact the health of our community, we have to learn more about the exact relationship between health, genetics, social determinants of health and the environment.

I am tremendously proud of Renown Health’s collaboration with the Desert Research Institute, a world leader in environmental sciences and the application of scientific research and new technologies. Together, we are conducting a ground-breaking, community-based population health study that holds great promise.

With the Healthy Nevada Project, we are combining genetic data with health and population data, as well as information from environmental databases, to identify and model public health risks ranging from disease and illness to the effects of environmental factors such as air quality on the health of Nevadans. This information will help us respond strategically to the future health needs of our patients and communities, thereby improving care delivery in our region.

The purpose of this pilot study was to understand the population health needs of the northern Nevada community by assessing environmental data, population health outcomes, genetic information and socio-economic determinants. The goal is to improve health outcomes by not only treating disease, but preventing disease by finding connections in the data.

This transformative approach to population health started over a simple cup of coffee with a fellow New Jersey native, Joe Grzymski, PhD, a senior director at the Desert Research Institute. I expected we would chat about our home state, but our conversation quickly turned to ways we could collaborate. We began to brainstorm ways we could combine Renown Health’s clinical data with DRI’s environmental data to better understand the ways outside factors affect health outcomes in our community.

The data we are gathering may help predict who may be at risk, allow for quicker diagnoses, reduce costs and improve health care by changing participant behavior. A unique team of machine learning experts and data scientists at DRI are utilizing the latest advanced analytics techniques to gain greater insights into the data. Funding was provided by the Renown Health Foundation and Nevada’s Knowledge Fund.

The initial study launched Sept. 15, 2016 to 5,000 potential participants and offered community members the opportunity to volunteer for research and gain access to their individual genetic information at no cost. The list filled in less than 24 hours, so we doubled the study size (which filled in another 24 hours).

9fe15_636461827484122709-DRI.Renown.presser.26 Healthy Nevada Project: Improving health through genetics and big data - WBIR

Participants in the Healthy Nevada study range from ages 18-90 years old and from 135 zip codes in northern Nevada. Socio-economic survey information was obtained using an advanced online survey tool, and all responses remained confidential.

The information is sorely needed. A recent community health needs assessment conducted by the Washoe County Health District and Renown Health determined the top three causes of death in Washoe County, Nev., are heart disease, cancer and chronic lower respiratory disease. This trend holds true for Nevada and the United States. Washoe County rates, however, are higher, and the economic impact of these diseases is significant — communities and families must shoulder the burden of increases in medical costs, reduced productivity and lower quality of life.

It is our hope that the aggregate data obtained through the Healthy Nevada Project, combined with personal health data information delivered to study participants and health education and outreach interventions, may contribute to a reduction in heart, respiratory and cancer casualties and provide our community with a higher overall quality of life.

We’ve also begun adding cohorts to the study. The first includes a group of extraordinary athletes from the High Fives Foundation, a Truckee, Calif.-based nonprofit that provides resources and inspiration to mountain athletes who have suffered life-altering injuries. Through this new cohort, we hope to unlock some of the keys to better treatment and success in survivorship for those who experience devastating injuries.

9fe15_636461827484122709-DRI.Renown.presser.26 Healthy Nevada Project: Improving health through genetics and big data - WBIR

Looking forward, we hope to build an infrastructure to apply the population health pilot to all 2.9 million Nevada residents to enable researchers to build predictive models to look for significant population health factors that consider demographic variables—gender, age, income, location—as well as factors that determine community health, individual health and likelihood of chronic disease.

As a healthcare system with the largest market share in our community, this is the ultimate in strategic planning. If our community is more at risk for cardiovascular disease 10 years from now, we can be thoughtful about recruiting cardiologists. If we know that the population is growing in pediatrics, we can start a program for pediatric residents at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine and grow our pool of pediatricians. The horizon for planning can be kept in view because we’re learning about our population’s health and disease. And that’s just good medicine.

Tony Slonim, MD, DrPH, is President and Chief Executive Officer of Renown Health in Reno, Nev. He is a proud father, physician leader, mentor, TEDx speaker and cancer survivor. Follow Dr. Slonim on Twitter and on his CEO Blog

Project Fi Android One Moto X4 deal offers $100 service credit

Project Fi is offering buyers $100 in service credit if they purchase a Moto X4. The deal isn’t for any Moto X4, though; you’ll need to buy the Android One Moto X4 offered through the Project Fi online store, which is itself offered both as a one-time payment and under a monthly device payment arrangement. The promotion is available as a Black Friday deal and as such will only be around for a few days.

Read the rest of this page »

Deal: Get $100 in Project Fi credit with Moto X4 Android One purchase

baf11_Moto-X4-Review-10-840x473 Deal: Get $100 in Project Fi credit with Moto X4 Android One purchase

Back in September, Google revealed that the Android One edition of the Motorola Moto X4 would join the list of its official Project Fi-compatible smartphones. At the time, that made the phone the most affordable of all the phones that would work on Google’s mobile network, with a price of $399. Now, Google is giving buyers an additional incentive as part of its Black Friday sales efforts. It will give Moto X4 buyers on Project Fi a $100 credit on the network.

PSA: Project Fi works in any phone – mostly

From now until November 30, if you decide to purchase the Android One Moto X4 from Project Fi, a service credit of $100 will be applied to your Fi account after the device has been activated. The credit is supposed to be put in place within 30 days of the Moto X4 shipping, and the phone must also remain active on the network for 30 days.

As a reminder, the Android One Moto X4 current runs on Android Nougat 7.1.1 out of the box, but because it is part of the Android One program, it’s likely to get an update to Android 8.0 Oreo in the very near future. The phone includes a 5.2-inch 1080p IPS LCD display, a Qualcomm Snapdragon 630 processor, 3 GB of RAM and 32 GB of storage, with a microSD card slot to add even more storage. It also has a dual rear camera setup with a main 12 MP sensor, and an 8 MP secondary sensor, along with a single 16 MP front-facing camera.

Interested? Click the link below to get the discount.

A Revolution in Custom ROMs: How Project Treble makes Porting Android Oreo a 1 Day Job

The XDA forums have been the central gathering of custom ROM development for years. It’s thanks to the hard work of developers on our forums that many older Android smartphones are kept alive by custom ROMS sometimes years after devices were abandoned by the device maker. Though most manufacturers release bootloader unlocking methods these days, frequent delays in kernel source releases has stifled custom ROM development on many smartphones. That may soon change, however, thanks to something called “Project Treble” which was announced near the release of Android Oreo. Thanks to Project Treble, the time it takes to port an AOSP ROM onto a device should no longer take weeks or months—instead it should take merely days.

For those of you who have followed the custom ROM scene for years, you might already be aware with how significant this news is. XDA Recognized Developer OldDroid called this revelation a “breakthrough” in custom AOSP ROM development. Thanks to Project Treble support, for example, I was able to boot a nearly fully functioning Android 8.0 Oreo ROM on the Huawei Mate 9—a device that until now hadn’t even seen a single AOSP Android Nougat ROM.

We may soon be seeing a revolution in custom ROM development thanks to the initial development efforts on this front by XDA Senior Member phhusson. After 20 hours of work researching, developing, and debugging with me, phhusson created a system image that can be booted on multiple devices from different manufacturers and with completely different SoCs. For example, the same system image that I booted on my own Huawei Mate 9 also boots on the Honor 8 Pro, Honor 9, Sony Xperia XZ1 Compact, and the Essential Phone. That’s 3 different OEMs (Huawei/Honor, Sony, and Essential) and 2 different SoCs (HiSilicon Kirin 960 and Qualcomm Snapdragon 835) where this single system image can successfully boot.

It’s possible that in the future, we could be seeing a single system image that can work on dozens of different Android smartphones, much like how Microsoft Windows can run on nearly any computer hardware. In order to encourage more development on this front, we’ve opened up a new forum dedicated to Project Treble enabled devices. The forum is geared towards developers at this moment, so please refrain from starting a new thread unless you are interested in contributing to development. If you wish to help test Treble-compatible system images, then feel free to leave comments on existing threads.

Join the Project Treble Development Forum

Given the significance of this development and the complexity of the topic, I thought I would approach this article a bit differently than the others. I’ll be running down a bullet point list explaining some common questions people might have as well as point out key facts regarding this latest development.


What is Project Treble?

2d8f5_Project-Treble-1024x556 A Revolution in Custom ROMs: How Project Treble makes Porting Android Oreo a 1 Day Job

Credits: Google

Project Treble is most commonly described as an attempt by Google to modularize the Android OS framework to separate vendor specific code. Let’s break things down a bit more:

  • The full update process to bring a new Android version to devices is a long and complex topic, but Sony has done a great job with this infographic which outlines the basic steps.
  • The “vendor” usually refers to silicon-manufacturers such as Qualcomm, but can also refer to the maker of any other proprietary hardware found in a device. The “device maker” or “OEM” usually needs to wait for the vendor to update their code so the proprietary hardware works with the Android OS framework in a newer version of Android.
  • However, what is happening with Project Treble is that Google is requiring that any vendor-specific code be separated from the Android OS framework and instead live in its own vendor implementation. Usually this means that there is now a separate /vendor partition on Treble-enabled smartphones that contains a bunch of HALs (Hardware Abstraction Layers).
  • Furthermore, vendors must implement code that lets the Android OS framework communicate with HALs in a standardized way. This is done via HIDL (HAL Interface Definition Language). With this in place, an OEM can work on an Android update without having to wait on vendors to update their HALs. Theoretically, this should speed up the entire Android update process as vendors can update their code at any time through the Play Store, for example.
  • To help understand what a HAL is and how it relates to Android, let’s consider an analogy. Imagine a car. The steering wheel and brakes are the HAL while the driver is the Android OS framework. The driver (Android) moves the steering wheel and presses on the brakes (the HAL) in order to control the movement of the car (the hardware).
  • Now imagine if we lived in a world where every car manufacturer decided to design their steering wheels or re-arrange their brakes in a completely different way. If you put a driver in a new car, they may be confused with how to initially handle the vehicle. But thanks to standards, every driver should be familiar with how to operate a steering wheel and brakes on almost any car. Further, driving school teaches all drivers the proper way to operate a vehicle. In this analogy, the vehicle standards are Project Treble and driving school is HIDL.

2d8f5_Project-Treble-1024x556 A Revolution in Custom ROMs: How Project Treble makes Porting Android Oreo a 1 Day Job

Android Oreo on the Honor 8 Pro. Credits: XDA Recognized Developer OldDroid

What devices will get Project Treble support?

  • All devices that launch with Android 8.0 Oreo or above must fully support Project Treble.
  • All devices that upgrade to Android 8.0 Oreo are not required to fully support Project Treble.
  • The devices that have updates (official releases or closed betas) to Android 8.0 Oreo and do support Treble include the following:
  • It is unlikely for any devices to unofficially receive Project Treble support via custom ROM development. HALs are not open source after all.

Why is Project Treble so important for AOSP ROMs?

  • To ensure that the vendor code is properly separated from the Android OS framework in the manner that Project Treble requires, Google has set up a Vendor Test Suite (VTS) which devices must pass in order to be certified by Google. Google certification is important because without it a device are not allowed to ship with Google Play apps and services pre-installed.
  • One of the requirements in the VTS is that a Treble-enabled device must be able to boot a raw, generic AOSP build. Because of this requirement, OEMs have to ship devices that can boot AOSP without any issues.
  • Although the exact ROM that Google uses and shares with OEMs for VTS is not public, XDA Senior Member phhusson was able to figure out how to recreate this ROM from source.
  • Thus, we now have a working AOSP ROM that is guaranteed to be bootable on Project Treble devices. Most of the work was done by OEMs and vendors already, so no longer do independent developers on our forums need to mess around with kernel source code or HAL hackery. In theory, an AOSP ROM should “just work” which we’ve shown to be basically true on the devices we’ve tested.
  • At the moment, compatibility is not 100% with all devices the system image can be booted on. There are also some race conditions that need to be figured out. However, Project Treble significantly cuts down on the amount of development work that is needed to port AOSP ROMs onto non-Google devices. With the collaboration of more developers in our Project Treble forum, we expect to see Treble device development go a long way.

How do I try out Android Oreo on my device now?

If you’re really adventurous and want to try out one of these Project Treble builds on your phone right now, phhusson has the system images you need to download over on his thread in our Project Treble forum. There are a few things you need to keep in mind, though:

  • You will need an unlocked bootloader and need to be familiar with using fastboot commands to flash images.
  • Your device must already be running Android Oreo. These system images do not “upgrade” your device. If you are running one of the Huawei/Honor devices mentioned in this article, you can look on our forums for a guide or use the FunkyHuawei.club service to unofficially update your phone to one of the closed Oreo beta builds.
  • You must be willing to lose data or reflash factory images while testing. The best way to ensure this boots is to wipe the userdata partition, which includes wiping all of the contents on your internal storage. Of course you can make backups and transfer them over once you’re done.
  • These AOSP builds are currently not meant for use as daily drivers. They are extremely bare bones and do not offer many features or apps pre-installed. You will have to flash Google apps yourself. You will have to manually input your carrier’s APN settings to make mobile data work (if it works). Things will be buggy until more development effort is put forth.

Conclusion

Google wasn’t kidding when they said that Project Treble was perhaps one of the biggest changes ever to the way Android works. We can see for ourselves, right here and now, just how much of an impact it can have. Treble might be the push the development community needs to revitalize the custom ROM scene. It took less than 1 day to boot a nearly fully functioning AOSP ROM on the Huawei Mate 9. I’m excited to see the work that will be done for other Treble-enabled devices.

A Revolution in Custom ROMs: How Project Treble makes Porting Android Oreo a 1 Day Job

The XDA forums have been the central gathering of custom ROM development for years. It’s thanks to the hard work of developers on our forums that many older Android smartphones are kept alive by custom ROMS sometimes years after devices were abandoned by the device maker. Though most manufacturers release bootloader unlocking methods these days, frequent delays in kernel source releases has stifled custom ROM development on many smartphones. That may soon change, however, thanks to something called “Project Treble” which was announced near the release of Android Oreo. Thanks to Project Treble, the time it takes to port an AOSP ROM onto a device should no longer take weeks or months—instead it should take merely days.

For those of you who have followed the custom ROM scene for years, you might already be aware with how significant this news is. XDA Recognized Developer OldDroid called this revelation a “breakthrough” in custom AOSP ROM development. Thanks to Project Treble support, for example, I was able to boot a nearly fully functioning Android 8.0 Oreo ROM on the Huawei Mate 9—a device that until now hadn’t even seen a single AOSP Android Nougat ROM.

We may soon be seeing a revolution in custom ROM development thanks to the initial development efforts on this front by XDA Senior Member phhusson. After 20 hours of work researching, developing, and debugging with me, phhusson created a system image that can be booted on multiple devices from different manufacturers and with completely different SoCs. For example, the same system image that I booted on my own Huawei Mate 9 also boots on the Honor 8 Pro, Honor 9, Sony Xperia XZ1 Compact, and the Essential Phone. That’s 3 different OEMs (Huawei/Honor, Sony, and Essential) and 2 different SoCs (HiSilicon Kirin 960 and Qualcomm Snapdragon 835) where this single system image can successfully boot.

It’s possible that in the future, we could be seeing a single system image that can work on dozens of different Android smartphones, much like how Microsoft Windows can run on nearly any computer hardware. In order to encourage more development on this front, we’ve opened up a new forum dedicated to Project Treble enabled devices. The forum is geared towards developers at this moment, so please refrain from starting a new thread unless you are interested in contributing to development. If you wish to help test Treble-compatible system images, then feel free to leave comments on existing threads.

Join the Project Treble Development Forum

Given the significance of this development and the complexity of the topic, I thought I would approach this article a bit differently than the others. I’ll be running down a bullet point list explaining some common questions people might have as well as point out key facts regarding this latest development.


What is Project Treble?

2d8f5_Project-Treble-1024x556 A Revolution in Custom ROMs: How Project Treble makes Porting Android Oreo a 1 Day Job

Credits: Google

Project Treble is most commonly described as an attempt by Google to modularize the Android OS framework to separate vendor specific code. Let’s break things down a bit more:

  • The full update process to bring a new Android version to devices is a long and complex topic, but Sony has done a great job with this infographic which outlines the basic steps.
  • The “vendor” usually refers to silicon-manufacturers such as Qualcomm, but can also refer to the maker of any other proprietary hardware found in a device. The “device maker” or “OEM” usually needs to wait for the vendor to update their code so the proprietary hardware works with the Android OS framework in a newer version of Android.
  • However, what is happening with Project Treble is that Google is requiring that any vendor-specific code be separated from the Android OS framework and instead live in its own vendor implementation. Usually this means that there is now a separate /vendor partition on Treble-enabled smartphones that contains a bunch of HALs (Hardware Abstraction Layers).
  • Furthermore, vendors must implement code that lets the Android OS framework communicate with HALs in a standardized way. This is done via HIDL (HAL Interface Definition Language). With this in place, an OEM can work on an Android update without having to wait on vendors to update their HALs. Theoretically, this should speed up the entire Android update process as vendors can update their code at any time through the Play Store, for example.
  • To help understand what a HAL is and how it relates to Android, let’s consider an analogy. Imagine a car. The steering wheel and brakes are the HAL while the driver is the Android OS framework. The driver (Android) moves the steering wheel and presses on the brakes (the HAL) in order to control the movement of the car (the hardware).
  • Now imagine if we lived in a world where every car manufacturer decided to design their steering wheels or re-arrange their brakes in a completely different way. If you put a driver in a new car, they may be confused with how to initially handle the vehicle. But thanks to standards, every driver should be familiar with how to operate a steering wheel and brakes on almost any car. Further, driving school teaches all drivers the proper way to operate a vehicle. In this analogy, the vehicle standards are Project Treble and driving school is HIDL.

2d8f5_Project-Treble-1024x556 A Revolution in Custom ROMs: How Project Treble makes Porting Android Oreo a 1 Day Job

Android Oreo on the Honor 8 Pro. Credits: XDA Recognized Developer OldDroid

What devices will get Project Treble support?

  • All devices that launch with Android 8.0 Oreo or above must fully support Project Treble.
  • All devices that upgrade to Android 8.0 Oreo are not required to fully support Project Treble.
  • The devices that have updates (official releases or closed betas) to Android 8.0 Oreo and do support Treble include the following:
  • It is unlikely for any devices to unofficially receive Project Treble support via custom ROM development. HALs are not open source after all.

Why is Project Treble so important for AOSP ROMs?

  • To ensure that the vendor code is properly separated from the Android OS framework in the manner that Project Treble requires, Google has set up a Vendor Test Suite (VTS) which devices must pass in order to be certified by Google. Google certification is important because without it a device are not allowed to ship with Google Play apps and services pre-installed.
  • One of the requirements in the VTS is that a Treble-enabled device must be able to boot a raw, generic AOSP build. Because of this requirement, OEMs have to ship devices that can boot AOSP without any issues.
  • Although the exact ROM that Google uses and shares with OEMs for VTS is not public, XDA Senior Member phhusson was able to figure out how to recreate this ROM from source.
  • Thus, we now have a working AOSP ROM that is guaranteed to be bootable on Project Treble devices. Most of the work was done by OEMs and vendors already, so no longer do independent developers on our forums need to mess around with kernel source code or HAL hackery. In theory, an AOSP ROM should “just work” which we’ve shown to be basically true on the devices we’ve tested.
  • At the moment, compatibility is not 100% with all devices the system image can be booted on. There are also some race conditions that need to be figured out. However, Project Treble significantly cuts down on the amount of development work that is needed to port AOSP ROMs onto non-Google devices. With the collaboration of more developers in our Project Treble forum, we expect to see Treble device development go a long way.

How do I try out Android Oreo on my device now?

If you’re really adventurous and want to try out one of these Project Treble builds on your phone right now, phhusson has the system images you need to download over on his thread in our Project Treble forum. There are a few things you need to keep in mind, though:

  • You will need an unlocked bootloader and need to be familiar with using fastboot commands to flash images.
  • Your device must already be running Android Oreo. These system images do not “upgrade” your device. If you are running one of the Huawei/Honor devices mentioned in this article, you can look on our forums for a guide or use the FunkyHuawei.club service to unofficially update your phone to one of the closed Oreo beta builds.
  • You must be willing to lose data or reflash factory images while testing. The best way to ensure this boots is to wipe the userdata partition, which includes wiping all of the contents on your internal storage. Of course you can make backups and transfer them over once you’re done.
  • These AOSP builds are currently not meant for use as daily drivers. They are extremely bare bones and do not offer many features or apps pre-installed. You will have to flash Google apps yourself. You will have to manually input your carrier’s APN settings to make mobile data work (if it works). Things will be buggy until more development effort is put forth.

Conclusion

Google wasn’t kidding when they said that Project Treble was perhaps one of the biggest changes ever to the way Android works. We can see for ourselves, right here and now, just how much of an impact it can have. Treble might be the push the development community needs to revitalize the custom ROM scene. It took less than 1 day to boot a nearly fully functioning AOSP ROM on the Huawei Mate 9. I’m excited to see the work that will be done for other Treble-enabled devices.

Project Fi’s Black Friday deal offers $100 credit with Android One Moto X4 purchase

After launching a referral challenge for the holidays last week, Project Fi is hosting a Black Friday deal on the Moto X4. The Android One device is the cheapest way to get service from Google’s MVNO and now comes with a $100 Fi credit that goes towards your monthly bill.


76265_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Project Fi's Black Friday deal offers $100 credit with Android One Moto X4 purchase

Nintendo Switch

Announced in September, the Moto X4 is Google’s first Android One device for the United States. Featuring a 5.2-inch 1080p display, the device’s glass body has front and rear curves that make for a reflective device.

A Snapdragon 630 processor power it with 3GB of RAM and 32GB of on-board storage expandable via microSD. The rear features a dual-camera setup with 12MP and 8MP sensors combining for depth effects and other creative modes. There is also a 16MP front-facing camera that has an “adaptive low-light mode” and “panoramic selfies.”

As an Android One device, it has a “pure Android experience” with Oreo promised before year’s end and a fast update to Android P in 2018. Meanwhile, there is a guarantee of monthly security patches.

At $399, the device comes in Sterling Blue or Super Black. Those who purchase the device between today and next Thursday will get a $100 Project Fi credit that’s good towards their monthly bill.

The credit will be applied if the Moto X4 is activated on your account within a month of it shipping and if it remains active for 30 days. This $100 can also be applied to those in group plans:

For a single subscriber account, the service credit can only be applied to the user who purchases the device. For a group plan account, the service credit will be applied to the group plan owner.


Check out 9to5Google on YouTube for more news:

Cloud Computer: Project Boosteroid Announces Token Sale

Get Trading Recommendations and Read Analysis on Hacked.com for just $39 per month.

This is a submitted sponsored story. CCN urges readers to conduct their own research with due diligence into the company, product or service mentioned in the content below.

BTR: Is This New Digital Currency Worth Making Investments?

Project Boosteroid announced its ICO from November 27th to December 11th, 2017. Collected investments will help developers create a cloud services platform that provides convenient access to computing power, storages and software products (similar to Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud).

 Cloud Computer: Project Boosteroid Announces Token Sale Cloud Computer: Project Boosteroid Announces Token Sale

The service will allow to process video, create 3D-graphics, play games that require high computer performance or carry out machine learning on any device even on the most low-performance PC.

“The idea of our project is to create a service that will provide access to computing power in two mouse clicks. We will develop user-friendly interface that will make the selection of needed computing power easy even for those users who purchased their first PC last weekend”, – says Boosteroid founder  Ivan Shvaichenko.

According to Boosteroid СЕO, the platform is already being built, which is a significant advantage comparing to other ICO projects.  

“We are already building our computing facilities and we’ll expand them regardless of the ICO results. Computing facilities with the peak power of more than 0.5 petaflops began operating in July, 2017. The team plans to reach 20 petaflops by February, 2018”, – says Ivan Shvaichenko.

Tokensale details

There are 300 000 000 BTR available for sale. It will be possible to buy BTR from November 27th to December 11th, 2017 in the personal account on the website. Payments are accepted in ETH, BTC, LTC and BCH. Initial price of 1 BTR — $1,08.

What is BTR token value

1 BTR is equal to 1 hour rent of computing power*.

 Cloud Computer: Project Boosteroid Announces Token Sale Cloud Computer: Project Boosteroid Announces Token Sale

*1 BTR = the cost of one hour computing power rent on the basis of eight NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti graphic cards; two Intel Xeon E5 2680v4 processors; RAM 256Gb; SSD 960Gb.

All unsold and undistributed tokens will be destroyed after the ICO. Tokens accepted as a payment for the service will expire. So there won’t be too much tokens on the market.

What benefits will token holders get?

Investors will be able to rent computing power with BTR tokens on more favorable terms or exchange them for other digital currencies or fiat money on exchanges and gain profit (today the lowest 1 hour cloud computing power rent is  $6 – $ 10,5).

After the service is launched the team will start token buyback on cryptocurrency exchanges.

We will create a demand for BTR. After our service is launched we’ll start purchasing tokens for fiat money paid by users who rent Boosteroid computing power. Considering a large number of users and a limited number of released tokens, BTR exchange rate will increase and investors will get maximum profit.”, – says Boosteroid CEO Ivan Shvaichenko.

You can find out more about the project here.

OnePlus 3/3T and 5/5T will get Android 8.1 Oreo but no Project Treble

0e87c_oneplus-5t-initial-review-aa-14-of-22-840x473 OnePlus 3/3T and 5/5T will get Android 8.1 Oreo but no Project Treble

It’s been a big week for OnePlus. Not only did it push the big Android Oreo update to the OnePlus 3 and 3T, but also started selling the newly announced OnePlus 5T.

Now, the company making a few more headlines and they all revolve around software. During an AMA on the OnePlus Forums, Staff Member Adam Krisko cleared up some confusion about the upgrades and features coming to previous OnePlus devices.

The biggest news by far out of the AMA is that both the 3 and 3T will receive an upgrade to Android 8.1. No time tables were shared, but OnePlus’ commitment to bring the update to its older phones is encouraging.

See also: Android 8.1 Oreo will “downgrade” inactive apps to save space

We’re also getting word that the company will not support Project Treble on either the 3/3T or 5/5T. Project Treble was introduced earlier this year and aims to bring faster updates to Android devices. It works by separating the OS code from the vendor code. This would allow vendors like Samsung or LG to push core OS updates to its phones without re-optimizing its own code.

Krisko didn’t elaborate on why Treble won’t be supported, but simply stated that OnePlus is not currently supporting Treble and does not plan to for these devices.

What do you think about OnePlus promising to update the OnePlus 3 and 3T to Android 8.1? Is the lack of Treble support a deal-breaker for you? Let us know down in the comments.

Prynt is finally coming to Android, so you might want to hop on this Kickstarter project ASAP

Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission.

We were already huge fans of the Prynt device back when we covered it in 2016. Being able to print photos from your phone and watching them move with the Prynt app brought us closer to the world of Harry Potter than we thought possible. 

But the app and peripheral were only available for Apple products, which left Android users kind of alienated. Prynt is looking to change that by finally releasing a version for Android products — with a little help from Kickstarter first.

In case you haven’t heard, Prynt is a special peripheral that you can plug into your phone to print out photos. The companion app also lets your record five-second videos from those pics and when you use the AR function, the photo pops to life on screen with the video you recorded. Your photos print out on sticker paper so you can either frame them or decorate your wall. (Also great: You can order more paper through the app.) 

Check out Prynt for Android’s Kickstarter page to learn more and drop a pledge — for $119 you can get the device when it ships in April.

0fd44_https%253A%252F%252Fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%252Fuploads%252Fcard%252Fimage%252F653117%252F8a731256-a4b2-4416-8c55-3852714cea73 Prynt is finally coming to Android, so you might want to hop on this Kickstarter project ASAP

Want a free Google Chromecast and Android One Moto X4? Try the Project Fi referral challenge

13348_Moto-X4-Review-14-840x473 Want a free Google Chromecast and Android One Moto X4? Try the Project Fi referral challenge

The discount bonanza that is Black Friday is just days away, but the tech deals are already coming in thick and fast. Now it’s Google turn to embrace the season of discounts with an enticing promotion for its experimental mobile network, Project Fi.

Starting from today until December 17th, the Project Fi referral program will now gift subscribers with prizes on top of the usual $20 referral credit. Dubbed the “Fi it Forward” challenge, Fi users will receive a free Chromecast for two qualifying referrals.

Register seven or more referrals and you’ll win Google’s grand prize: a brand new Android One Moto X4. The Lenovo-made device is the cheapest and most recent addition to the Fi-ready ranks and is a great mid-tier phone that’s bolstered by its stock-like Android One software experience and impressive design. Plus it’s free!

To get involved in the referral challenge, Fi users simply have to grab a unique link within the Project Fi app or web portal and share it with family and friends via text, social media, email, or any other way they like.

There’s even a leaderboard for comparing your tally to other Fi subscribers across the US. The current leader is on twelve referrals at time of writing, so you might have some catching up to do if you want to win. You can see the top ten and get started with your own referral links here.

To sweeten the deal, Google will also donate $50,000 to the Information Technology Disaster Resource Center (ITDRC) as part of the campaign. There are no additional requirements for this though. As Google puts it: “You’re already helping support this gift just by being part of Project Fi.”

This isn’t the first time the search giant has leveraged its MVNO network to support disaster relief. During Hurricane Harvey earlier this year, the search giant applied a $20 account credit for each customer living in the impacted areas.

Will you be joining Project Fi in time for the holidays? Let us know your thoughts on Fi it Forward in the comments.

Want a free Google Chromecast and Android One Moto X4? Try the Project Fi referral challenge

13348_Moto-X4-Review-14-840x473 Want a free Google Chromecast and Android One Moto X4? Try the Project Fi referral challenge

The discount bonanza that is Black Friday is just days away, but the tech deals are already coming in thick and fast. Now it’s Google turn to embrace the season of discounts with an enticing promotion for its experimental mobile network, Project Fi.

Starting from today until December 17th, the Project Fi referral program will now gift subscribers with prizes on top of the usual $20 referral credit. Dubbed the “Fi it Forward” challenge, Fi users will receive a free Chromecast for two qualifying referrals.

Register seven or more referrals and you’ll win Google’s grand prize: a brand new Android One Moto X4. The Lenovo-made device is the cheapest and most recent addition to the Fi-ready ranks and is a great mid-tier phone that’s bolstered by its stock-like Android One software experience and impressive design. Plus it’s free!

To get involved in the referral challenge, Fi users simply have to grab a unique link within the Project Fi app or web portal and share it with family and friends via text, social media, email, or any other way they like.

There’s even a leaderboard for comparing your tally to other Fi subscribers across the US. The current leader is on twelve referrals at time of writing, so you might have some catching up to do if you want to win. You can see the top ten and get started with your own referral links here.

To sweeten the deal, Google will also donate $50,000 to the Information Technology Disaster Resource Center (ITDRC) as part of the campaign. There are no additional requirements for this though. As Google puts it: “You’re already helping support this gift just by being part of Project Fi.”

This isn’t the first time the search giant has leveraged its MVNO network to support disaster relief. During Hurricane Harvey earlier this year, the search giant applied a $20 account credit for each customer living in the impacted areas.

Will you be joining Project Fi in time for the holidays? Let us know your thoughts on Fi it Forward in the comments.

Project Fi launches new referral challenge w/ Chromecast & Android …

Over the past year, Google’s Project Fi MVNO has made use of various referral programs to attract new subscribers, as well as reward existing ones. The latest “Fi it Forward” challenge offers a chance to win a Chromecast and an Android One Moto X4.


87bd2_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Project Fi launches new referral challenge w/ Chromecast & Android ...

Nintendo Switch

This contest runs for a month, beginning today and ending on December 17th. As usual, each referral gets both the referer and the referee a $20 Fi allowance towards their monthly bill. This particular contest caps those credits at 25 per user.

Referrals have to be active for over 30 days in order to count towards both the credit and the prizes. This time it is a Chromecast after two credits, with seven nabbing the Android One Moto X4 that launched just last month.

Google is also offering a third prize of sorts that sees them making a $50,000 donation at the end of the period to the Information Technology Disaster Resource Center (ITDRC).

We’re thrilled to see organizations like the ITDRC harness the power of communications technology to make a meaningful difference in crisis response and recovery, and we’re grateful to come together as a community to support their initiatives.

Existing subscribers that want to participate have to explicitly enter the contest by heading to the “Share the Fi Love” tab on the Fi site when signed in and enter. Afterwards, they will receive a unique referral code to link out with.

Google notes that this contest is first rolling out on desktop, though a banner should be making its way to the mobile app as well.


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