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Scientist studies health problems of Arctic living – Fairbanks Daily News

FAIRBANKS — If one had any doubt that scientist Larry Duffy is a busy man, one need only look at his University of Alaska business card. On one side it reads: Larry Duffy, Director, Resilience and Adaptation Program, while the other side reads: Larry Duffy, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Spend some time talking with the man at his office in the West Ridge Research Building and you realize Duffy’s interests and work are so varied he could probably use several additional sets of two-sided cards.

 

An education in the Far North

A native of Brooklyn, New York, Duffy earned his bachelor’s in chemistry from Fordham University in 1969. America was in the middle of the Vietnam War at the time, but Duffy received a two year deferment to earn his masters’s degree. When given a choice of which university to go to, Duffy chose UAF even though “if you’re a New Yorker you want to go to the University of Miami, because that’s where all the girls are.”

“I went out and looked at the little board in front of the chemistry office and the first university it had listed was University of Alaska, so I said, ‘That sounds like a good idea,’” Duffy said. “Of course, I didn’t think I’d get it.”

Duffy not only earned his master’s in organic chemistry at UAF, he also met Gerrie Sheridan, the woman who would become his wife. Duffy was commissioned as a lieutenant in the United States Naval Reserves and shipped out two days after his wedding day. However, he got lucky and didn’t get sent to the “hot war” in Vietnam, but instead spent the next three years fighting the Cold War, “sailing in circles, chasing Russian submarines around the Mediterranean.”

Duffy chose to return to UAF after his service was over and earned his Ph.D. in biochemistry in 1977. After several years of research at Boston University, the Roche Institute of Molecular Biology, the University of Texas and Harvard Medical School, Duffy returned to UAF in 1987 as an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry. He was made department head in 1984 and appointed the College of Natural Science and Mathematics Associate Dean for Graduate Programs and Outreach in 2000.

Duffy said he and Gerrie, a local real estate agent, came back to Alaska because it’s “a great place to raise kids and to have a family.” The couple have three children: Anne, an artist who teaches art at UAF’s College of Liberal Arts; Kevin, a computer expert who teaches in Portland; and Ryan, an engineer who recently graduated from UAF. 

 

Understanding the challenges of the Arctic

Throughout his career, Duffy has studied a variety of problems specific to life in the Arctic. While in graduate school, he studied the effects of seasons on large mammals with wildlife scientist Bob White, researching the “two key stresses” of temperature and light cycles that influence the sleeping and eating behaviors of Arctic people. Working with the US Army, they explored the role that melatonin “the hormone of darkness,” plays in these stresses, and discovered soldiers — and indeed all Alaskans — have increased melatonin levels in winter. This increase causes shifts in a person’s diurnal rhythm and is associated with seasonal affective disorder, which can influence activity and susceptibility to disease.

Duffy’s postdoctoral work focused on human proteins synthesis and bacterial toxins in human diseases. He studied beta amyloid and neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer’s disease. Duffy learned and used several biomarker assays, which he used in collaboration with UAF biologists and state and federal agencies to study species threatened by the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Duffy credits this work with putting him on the path to expanding his research. 

“I’ve broadened my research activity from protein structure into the area of wildlife and human environmental health. The oil spill focused my attention on the need to develop biomarkers to monitor and assess the health of wildlife populations. These studies demonstrated that chronic exposure could be measured biochemically in mammals, not only showing damage to a resource, but also demonstrating recovery of the ecosystem,” Duffy said.

“Biomarkers in human health research led my research group back to wildlife and fish, but this time I focused on mercury exposure to humans from the fish that Alaskans consume. My work on mercury in subsistence food has been used by policymakers on the national level and allows me to involve undergraduate students in research and discuss issues of environmental ethics and justice.”

 

Making education accessible

Duffy’s work as an educator is focused on mentoring graduate students, teaching junior and senior level biology and chemistry and teaching a slightly lower level of those subjects to allied health majors pursuing careers as nurses, dental hygienists, village health aides and lab technicians, among others. 

“It’s targeted toward their literacy associated with their profession,” he said. 

He is working on making the allied health courses available online for distance learning.

“It’s all about access. This allows students to stay in their community, where they have jobs and they’re working. And they can get these lower level requirements out of the way. If you’re living out in the village and have a family, you can’t move into Anchorage or Fairbanks, but a lot of jobs require you have a certificate. This is a global and national problem: We make  these requirements and then we don’t provide means and access,” Duffy said. 

Duffy said his department put one class online several years ago and it has been “extremely successful.” They plan to add more classes, one of which he will teach.

 

Exciting new research

Although he’s busy with the allied health program, Duffy continues his research. He continues to work on resilience and adaptation in environmental health and is eagerly anticipating a new project using sled dogs to study Alzheimer’s disease. Since “animals don’t know how to speak and take psychological tests,” Duffy will work with Dr. Kriya Dunlap to study the accumulation of beta amyloid, tau and other proteins associated with Alzheimers by measuring the amounts in the dogs’ brains via periodic MRI scans. The dogs will be sedated and a vet technician will be on hand to monitor the dogs during the scans. The participating dogs will be scanned from the ages of 3 or 4 to the time of their natural deaths, at which time a necropsy can be performed and the brain tissue examined. 

“Using noninvasive brain image scanning technology, we can begin to study interventions, such as diet and exercise, on the increase of beta amyloid and tau over time,” Duffy said. “I expect continued progress and support in understanding healthy aging in the Far North over the years.”

Contact staff writer Dorothy Chomicz at 459-7582. Follow her on Twitter: @FDNMcrime.

PSA: If you have an older iPhone with slow performance, a new battery could solve your problems

One longstanding complaint from iPhone users is how their device slows down over time, specifically as the device ages and Apple releases new software updates. A Reddit thread has emerged this weekend with some interesting theories as to why this may happen…


842fe_spigen-teka-on-airpods PSA: If you have an older iPhone with slow performance, a new battery could solve your problems

Spigen TEKA RA200 Airpods Earhooks Cover

Last year, a growing number of iPhone 6s users reported that their device was suffering from random shutdowns. Apple subsequently launched a repair program for affected users, offering free battery replacements. At the time, the company said that a “very small number” of iPhone 6s users were affected by this problem.

A few months later, however, Apple said that more users were affected than it initially thought, and said a fix was coming in the form of a software update. The company eventually released iOS 10.2.1 and touted that shutdowns were reduced by 80 percent on iPhone 6s devices and by 70 percent on iPhone 6 devices.

At the time, it was speculated that the update made adjustments to the power management system in iOS. The Reddit thread this weekend, however, offers a slew of anecdotal evidence as to how this change ended up affecting device performance.

Wow, just installed GeekBench myself and tried with my 6 Plus. According to their website, my phone should score 1471/2476, but it actually scored 839/1377 … Which would explain why I, like you, have been feeling like my phone has gotten noticeably slower lately.

The gist of the thread, which has since acquired over 400 comments from users, is that replacing their iPhone battery caused a major uptick in performance, both real-world and in benchmark testing.

Many people might remember that iPhone 6S battery fiasco, which for many, was fixed with iOS 10.2.1, and that seemed to be the end of it. Apparently, the way it did this is by dynamically changing the maximum clock speed relative to the voltage that the battery is outputting, so that your phone can’t draw too much power and shut down.

Some in the thread speculate that Apple was inundated with battery replacement requests because of the random shutdown issue, and instead of coming clean about it, throttled devices with a software update to “solve” the problem:

Someone had a theory here that Apple did this because they were aware that there were a lot of faulty batteries that needs replacing, but instead of coming clean, they released iOS 10.2.1 which throttles our devices instead.

Users report that replacing their device’s battery caused performance to be improved significantly:

I did the same with my 6 Plus and the performance is day and night, can’t stop recommending it if you are happy with your phone and don’t want to replace it yet.

If you feel that you’re affected by this problem, you can use an app like CpuDasherX to see your device’s clock speed. Users report that the clock speed shown here is less than what it should be, adding merit to suggestions that Apple throttles devices affected by the shutdown issue.

While Apple says that Low Power Mode can reduce device speed in an effort to save battery life, this appears to be completely different and affects users without that featured enabled.

Furthermore, it’s important to note here that many of these issues aren’t necessarily ‘defects.’ Apple says iPhone batteries are designed to last some 2 years worth of charge cycles, thus meaning that many iPhone 6 and iPhone 6s devices are now outside of that window and not in their performance “prime” anymore.

This isn’t necessarily a new revelation. Apple has similar practices with the MacBook, where performance is essentially correlated to battery wear and usage. The more wear and tear on your battery, the more macOS works to optimize performance and battery life. More on that right here.

As for why the iPhone 7 and newer aren’t affected by this issue, Apple’s A10 and A11 chips include an additional fifth core that runs at a lower clock speed. This core is used in conjunction with the full-power cores to help offset performance and battery life concerns.

Ultimately, if you’re an iPhone 6 or iPhone 6s user suffering from increasingly slow device performance, a new battery could help solve your problem. We’re reaching out to Apple for further explanation as to what’s going on here.


Subscribe to 9to5Mac on YouTube for more Apple news:

Polluted air, health problems brought by Southern California fires …

A week of major wind-whipped fires across Southern California has caused significant air pollution and health problems.

The air quality is worst in and around fires burning from Ventura County to San Diego County, but the smoke has traveled to places not threatened by the flames. And with the Santa Ana winds dying down, officials say the smoke could stick around for a while.

Phil Moyer, air quality specialist with the Ventura County Air Pollution Control District, said a winter storm or new Santa Ana winds could lift the smoke out of Ojai, which is heavily polluted. But there’s no rain in the forecast and winds would have to be very strong to reach the low-lying community, and would likely intensify the fires.

“They’re going to see stacks of smoke for a while,” he said.

Polluted air, health problems brought by Southern California fires are expected to linger

A week of major wind-whipped fires across Southern California has caused significant air pollution and health problems.

The air quality is worst in and around fires burning from Ventura County to San Diego County, but the smoke has traveled to places not threatened by the flames. And with the Santa Ana winds dying down, officials say the smoke could stick around for a while.

Phil Moyer, air quality specialist with the Ventura County Air Pollution Control District, said a winter storm or new Santa Ana winds could lift the smoke out of Ojai, which is heavily polluted. But there’s no rain in the forecast and winds would have to be very strong to reach the low-lying community, and would likely intensify the fires.

“They’re going to see stacks of smoke for a while,” he said.

Polluted air, health problems brought by Southern California fires are expected to linger

A week of major wind-whipped fires across Southern California has caused significant air pollution and health problems.

The air quality is worst in and around fires burning from Ventura County to San Diego County, but the smoke has traveled to places not threatened by the flames. And with the Santa Ana winds dying down, officials say the smoke could stick around for a while.

Phil Moyer, air quality specialist with the Ventura County Air Pollution Control District, said a winter storm or new Santa Ana winds could lift the smoke out of Ojai, which is heavily polluted. But there’s no rain in the forecast and winds would have to be very strong to reach the low-lying community, and would likely intensify the fires.

“They’re going to see stacks of smoke for a while,” he said.

Microsoft People app on Windows 10 is once again having sync problems

7eb6b_Microsoft-People-for-Windows-10-Mobile Microsoft People app on Windows 10 is once again having sync problems
Image Courtesy: PocketNow.com.

Microsoft has given up on Windows 10 Mobile platform but they are committed to patching operating system with security updates and fixes till 2019. On October 28, a small group of users reported that Microsoft People app is having sync problems on Windows 10 Mobile. The problem was with non-insider builds too. The bug caused the disappearance of contacts in Windows 10 Mobile’s People app.

Microsoft addressed the issue a few days later with a small update, but the issue has arrived yet again. The server-side bug is only affecting the Windows 10 Mobile devices as the People app continues to function properly in Windows 10 PCs with same Microsoft account.

Many users including the Insiders are complaining that they are having a sync problem again with the People app. Microsoft hasn’t acknowledged the problem yet, although it seems a fairly widespread issue.

There is a fix available but it is not working for all users. To fix the bug, you can sync the contacts in Microsoft People app. It’s worth noting that resetting the Windows Phone handset won’t address this issue.

Since Microsoft has already confirmed that Windows Phone’s feature and hardware is no longer the company’s focus, and as they don’t give Windows Phone users any priority these days, don’t expect a fix anytime soon. You can, however, report this bug on the Feedback Hub and let the team know about the ongoing issues.


ABA Warns Judges of Ethical Problems Over Benches’ Internet Research

American Bar Association in Chicago. Photo: Diego M. Radzinschi/ALM.

The internet is a powerful research tool, but in the hands of a judge, its use poses serious ethical conundrums that are best avoided, warns a new American Bar Association opinion.

The ABA’s Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility, which develops and interprets ethics standards for lawyers and the judiciary, issued the opinion Friday. While internet information may be educational or useful, the ABA said, there are risks because internet information can be “biased, unreliable, or false.” When making decisions, judges should not rely on facts found via internet research that are not subject to the adversarial process, the guidance adds.

“Stated simply, a judge should not gather adjudicative facts from any source on the Internet unless the information is subject to proper judicial notice,” the guidance advises.

The guidance says judges should not conduct internet research to fill factual gaps in a case record, or to corroborate or discredit facts in the record. If extra information is needed, that information should be subject to judicial notice, or in other words, “not subject to reasonable dispute.” Judges should also ask parties to provide more information when appropriate, not go find it on their own.

Judges can, however, conduct research into general topics to help them understand a subject unrelated to a pending case, under the ABA’s rules. The guidance gives the example of a judge recently assigned to a jurisdiction with a high volume of environmental cases. That judge would not face ethical issues by reading articles and other materials about environmental law, according to the guidance.

The opinion lists additional hypothetical situations, and explains whether a judge’s behavior may be acceptable. That includes a judge using social media to learn about lawyers, jurors or parties in a case. While judges can use social media, the guidance says, judges should not gather information about jurors or parties.

But gathering information about a lawyer is a “closer question,” the ABA said. If a judge wants to become “familiar with counsel” who appear in his or her court, that’s acceptable. But judges cannot use independent research on lawyers in weighing or considering adjudicative facts.

The extent to which judges should engage in online research is a subject of ongoing debate, especially as social media sites that provide personal information about users have become more pervasive. In 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit handled a case in which a prisoner who suffered from gastroesophageal reflux brought an Eighth Amendment challenge, claiming prison officials restricted his access to over-the-counter medicines.

Judge Richard Posner, now retired, conducted extensive research on medical websites, including WebMD and others. In the opinion, Posner defended his research, writing that the court was not “deeming the Internet evidence cited in this opinion conclusive or even certifying it as being probably correct, though it may well be correct since it is drawn from reputable medical websites.” He said the information was only used “to underscore the existence of a genuine dispute of material fact” that arose in district court proceedings.

The dissenting judge, David Hamilton, wrote that Posner’s research was an “unprecedented departure from the proper role of an appellate court.”

It appears the ABA agrees, as its guidance explicitly states that judges should not conduct outside research to gather facts that affect the outcome of a case.

The ABA goes even further, noting that judges should simply ask parties to provide information if possible, rather than finding it themselves.

“Judges should not use the Internet for independent fact-gathering related to a pending or impending matter where the parties can easily be asked to research or provide the information,” the guidance says. “The same is true of the activities or characteristics of the litigants or other participants in the matter.”

Innovation is key to solving America’s health-care problems

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81fc0_104693972-GettyImages-127871289-biotech.530x298 Innovation is key to solving America's health-care problems

Medical technology innovation

In the last 30 years, breakthroughs in medical technology have transformed the treatment of cardiovascular disease with implantable defibrillators and drug-coated stents, of Type I diabetes with the sensor-based pumps and the advent of the artificial pancreas, and of spine, hip and knee surgery with implantable prostheses. Now, advancements in medical technology are addressing debilitating neurological diseases like Parkinson’s, incontinence and sleep apnea. With investment and imagination, the future of medical technology to help people seems almost unlimited.

Breakthrough drugs

Decades of scientific investment in genetics, genomics and proteomics have led to treating the immune system as the most promising way to cure cancer and other debilitating diseases. Breakthroughs in personalized medicine like immunotherapy and CAR-T therapy hold the potential for genuine cures, not just palliative treatments.

To make these high-priced treatments more affordable, they should be offered on a sliding scale based on ability to pay. Meanwhile, a wider array of generic drugs should be approved for traditional drugs such as statins to lower the overall cost of drug therapy. In addition, the multiple layers of drug distribution should be creatively disintermediated by direct-to-consumer approaches, thus dramatically cutting the overall cost of drug therapy.

Innovation in health-care delivery

In recent years, focus on health-care delivery has been making doctors and hospitals more efficient, leading to shortening appointments to less than 10 minutes — only enough time to issue a prescription without thorough diagnosis — often creating misdiagnosis and excessive drug use. Instead, we need to rethink the entire health-care delivery system by changing the basic model of one-to-one physician-patient interaction in a traditional health care institution by providing health care in community centers, YMCAs and retail centers like MinuteClinic (now owned by CVS), using nurses, allied health professionals and group classes.

Hospitals need to undergo massive consolidation to ensure that severe diseases and complex treatments can be carried out in the highest-volume centers that will lead to improved outcomes at lower costs. This will require clear movement away from fee-for-service to innovative health plans covering total costs with people having a fiscal stake in their health.

Innovative use of information

Health care’s information technology is woefully inadequate. From inability to match patient records with claims data to inadequate cost accounting data to poor transparency of prices to consumers, health care has been unable to provide even the basics of information. Now, however, opportunities to use the internet to connect patients and their basic information like EKGs to their physicians and health-care teams, along with artificial intelligence and big data married with patient data, offer entirely new fields for innovation, improved diagnosis, treatment and after-care.

Leading healthy lives

This fifth category of innovation – leading healthy lives – holds the greatest promise of all, as self-care becomes the new primary care. It is well known that unhealthy life styles account for 50 to 70 percent of health-care costs. For example, America’s obesity epidemic is the leading cause of Type II diabetes, heart disease, and spine, hip and knee issues. Yet instead of focusing on enabling people to lead healthy lives, we concentrate downstream on those who are sick and extremely ill to the point of nonrecovery.

To enable Americans to lead healthy lives, we should focus on three basic areas: 1) eating healthy, 2) physical fitness, and 3) stress reduction. How can innovation change life styles? Let’s look at some examples:

  1. Eating healthy. Innovative food and beverage companies, such as Boulder Brands and Suja Juice are transforming eating and drinking habits along with products like Earth Balance all-natural spreads, Udi’s gluten-free cereals and baked goods, and organic juices.
  2. Physical fitness. A relatively simple device like Fitbit has become transformative in changing people’s behavior by walking at least 10,000 steps per day or exercising in Lifetime Fitness clubs that focus on healthy living.
  3. Stress reduction. The mindfulness movement is revolutionizing daily behaviors that reduce stress through myriad mindfulness practices. Don’t know how to meditate? Innovative on-line products like Headspace provide guided meditation sessions and mindfulness training.

Today, the usage of these products is heavily concentrated among the middle and upper social-economic classes. The key now is to get them as ubiquitous as mobile phones by offering them in local communities and at lower prices.

For decades, American health-care systems have been mired in trying to become more efficient with essentially the same methods. What is needed to transform health care’s broken system is much more radical transformation that these innovations can bring. Rather than looking for political solutions to a broken system, the focus must shift to innovation to create more radical approaches that create entirely new systems.

Commentary by Bill George, a senior fellow at Harvard Business School, former chairman and CEO of Medtronic, and the author of “Discover Your True North.” He is a CNBC contributor. Follow him on Twitter @Bill_George.

For more insight from CNBC contributors, follow

@CNBCopinion

on Twitter.

81fc0_104693972-GettyImages-127871289-biotech.530x298 Innovation is key to solving America's health-care problems



Survey: Harvey left financial and mental health problems behind – KTRK

Harvey victims were left with little help and little hope, according to new survey results. At least one in six reported having a new or worsened health problem.

The survey, done by the Episcopal Health Foundation and Kaiser Family Foundation surveyed 1,600 Harvey victims from across south Texas.

Of those that applied for FEMA aid, 56 percent were denied aid or still have applications pending. Of those denied, 38 percent were given no reason why.

FEMA data, broken down by zip code shows
many denials were higher in lower-income, non-White neighborhoods while approvals in many cases were higher in areas that had a higher white population.

“There’s a certain way you have to answer it [the application for assistance]. If you answer one question [wrong], even if you misunderstood or didn’t understand it or comprehend the question, they deny you,” said one 29-year-old victim.

“FEMA has done some good things,” said Episcopal Health Foundation CEO Dr. Elena Marks.

“People really expected to be returning to normalcy and I think what they’re finding is that they can’t – that a significant percentage cannot. And those who are lower income and those who are African-American or Hispanic are having a worse time than others,” Marks said.

If you have NFIP insurance, you can find out more information about appeals on FEMA’s website.

If you were denied by FEMA, you can click here for an interactive tool to help you write an appeals letter.

You can read the full survey here.

Do you have a story tip, idea or question for Ted Oberg Investigates? Let us know, at abc13.com/tedstips

Computer problems shut down driver’s license offices statewide

BOISE – The Idaho Transportation Department closed most of the driver’s licensing offices across the state Tuesday because of a computer problem.

According to ITD, the system is having delays.

“As county offices go online, we’re seeing at the beginning of the day things are normal and OK,” ITD spokesman Jake Melder said. “But as more and more transactions go through, the system begins to slow down and we’re seeing those delays.”

Delays that become such an issue some transactions aren’t even processed. That means you could have finished all the work, but your license might not be printed.

“It’s our job to provide driver’s licenses to our citizens here in Ada County,” Sheriff Stephen Bartlett said. “But unfortunately, as a result of the outages throughout ITD’s system, we are unable to do that for our customers today.”

Over the weekend ITD did a software update, but they don’t know if it’s that update or something else that is causing the delays.

“Right now, if you want to think about it like a doctor and with his patient. We can see the symptoms, we don’t know what the root cause is yet,” Melder said.

They had to close all county licensing offices across the state on Tuesday, with the exception of Ada and Canyon counties.

“We don’t want to shut down every county in Idaho because we need those transactions moving forward to try to identify what exactly is going on,” Melder said.

It’s been a multi-day delay. It began on Friday and continued into Monday and Tuesday.

Something frustrating to customers and even the counties, especially after Ada County just rolled out new improvements to cut down wait times. For example, they extended hours and expanded service stations from 13 to 21.

“We’re ready to provide that high level of service, but unfortunately because of ITD and their system being down on a regular basis, we’re unavailable unable to do that for you today,” Bartlett said.

“People are taking time off of work to get into the counties and they’re not getting the services that they expect,” Melder said. “It is a real inconvenience and we do want to apologize to the public of Idaho. This isn’t up to our standards and we are working our hardest to correct this issue.”

ITD announced late Tuesday that is continuing to troubleshoot the computer problems and will open five DMV offices on Wednesday. The offices that will be open to the public are in Ada, Bannock, Canyon, Kootenai and Twin Falls counties. All others will remain closed.

ITD says the five county locations will remain open so they can work to identify the problem and test for solutions. Services at these locations are still expected to be slow. The public should plan for delays and postpone their visit, if possible.

All other county motor vehicle services such as titles and registration will be open the public and have not been affected by the computer issues.

 

© 2017 KTVB-TV

Health problems in Dunbar blamed on toxic site

FORT MYERS, Fla. –

There are mounting health concerns in the Fort Myers neighborhood where toxic sludge was discovered earlier this summer.

Rep. Heather Fitzenhagen (R-Fort Myers) wants free health screenings for families living just feet from the site tainted with arsenic in the ground.

The push for screenings comes after testing found dangerous levels of arsenic at the old dumping site along South Street, in the Dunbar neighborhood.

Some parents said their children’s health is suffering because of it.

The City of Fort Myers for years dumped lime at the site. It went untouched for years.

Recent test results show five times the amount of arsenic which is considered safe.

“A lot of allergy problems over here, constantly year-round,” said Theresa Hamilton.

Hamilton said her children suffer from coughing and watering eyes along with asthma.

Jessica Bustamante said all three of her children have asthma, which she believes could be a result of living across from the contaminated site.

Jeanie Scott also lives across the street and said she has been very congested since moving there.

“Me and my family and husband, over the years we have been staying here,” Scott noted.

All of the women believe the site is making them and their families sick.

“It’s a foul odor every now and then that comes over there. You’ve got to be cautious with the kids outside,” Hamilton said.

Tests results from groundwater wells show five times the amount of arsenic considered safe by the EPA.

Scott said her children played on the toxic site long before it was declared dangerous to the health of anyone.

For that reason, Fitzenhagen is calling for free health screenings for people living in the neighborhood.

“I think it is really important that we get the people of Dunbar to be able to take the types of tests necessary to find out if their health is being impacted by arsenic that is in the sludge on the site,” Fitzenhagen stated.

Residents want that sooner rather than later.

“I’m willing to have a health screening too, in order to figure out what is going on with me,” Scott said.

Fitzenhagen is working with healthcare providers to conduct the tests.

Testing of groundwater on the site is expected to continue Tuesday.

So far, the City of Fort Myers reports spending $107,000 on the testing.

© Copyright 2017 WBBH/WZVN (Waterman Broadcasting). All rights reserved.

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Farmerworkers’ Health Problems Increase As Workforce Gets Older …

6a02d_farm_workers_health-1_wide-cac7a51b5ecbfffd1b29b8c763d4742913a2065d-s1100-c15 Farmerworkers' Health Problems Increase As Workforce Gets Older ...

Researchers point to a number of causes for dwindling farmworkers: tighter border controls; higher prices charged by smugglers; well-paying construction jobs and a growing middle-class in Mexico that doesn’t want to pick vegetables for Americans.

Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images


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Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images

Researchers point to a number of causes for dwindling farmworkers: tighter border controls; higher prices charged by smugglers; well-paying construction jobs and a growing middle-class in Mexico that doesn’t want to pick vegetables for Americans.

Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images

That bag of frozen cauliflower sitting inside your freezer likely sprang to life in a vast field north of Salinas, Calif. A crew of men and women here use a machine to drop seedlings into the black soil. Another group follows behind, stooped over, tapping each new plant.

It is backbreaking, repetitive work. Ten-hour days start in the cold, dark mornings and end in the searing afternoon heat.

More than 90 percent of California’s crop workers were born in Mexico. But in recent years, fewer have migrated to the U.S., according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Researchers point to a number of causes: tighter border controls; higher prices charged by smugglers; well-paying construction jobs and a growing middle-class in Mexico that doesn’t want to pick vegetables for Americans.

6a02d_farm_workers_health-1_wide-cac7a51b5ecbfffd1b29b8c763d4742913a2065d-s1100-c15 Farmerworkers' Health Problems Increase As Workforce Gets Older ...

As a result, the average farmworker is now 45 years old, according to federal government data. Harvesting U.S. crops has been left to an aging population of farmworkers whose health has suffered from decades of hard labor. Older workers have a greater chance of getting injured and of developing chronic illnesses, which can raise the cost of workers’ compensation and health insurance.

“The slowdown is happening,” says Brent McKinsey, a third-generation farmer and one of the owners of Mission Ranches in Salinas. “You start to see your production drop, but it’s difficult to manage because there aren’t the younger people wanting to come in and work in this industry.”

After a long day hunched over, cutting and bunching mustard leaves, Gonzalo Picazo Lopez, a farmworker, says the pain shooting down his leg is acting up. Lopez has been working in the fields since the 1970s, when he crossed over from Mexico. At 67 years old, he looks timeworn, with silver hair and a white beard. Deep lines mark his face.

As Lopez describes how he carefully picks the leaves with his right hand and bunches with his left, he opens and closes his fingers with difficulty.

“In 2015 my left hand started to hurt,” says Lopez. “I went into work one morning and my hand was cold — ice cold.”

Lopez is a U.S. citizen and has Medicare. He hopes to work for almost another decade, until his wife, who is 61 and picks broccoli, can collect her Social Security.

Chronic pain is a common complaint at Clinica de Salud in Salinas. Nearly all of the patients at this community clinic are farmworkers. Many don’t have health insurance and pay what they can for medical care. Those fortunate enough to have immigration papers, rely on Medicaid.

6a02d_farm_workers_health-1_wide-cac7a51b5ecbfffd1b29b8c763d4742913a2065d-s1100-c15 Farmerworkers' Health Problems Increase As Workforce Gets Older ...

Oralia Marquez, a physician’s assistant at the clinic, says older farmworkers often develop arthritis, back pain, foot infections and breathing problems from pesticides.

Many of her patients, like Amalia Buitron Deaguilera are also struggling with diabetes. Deaguilera is 63. She has Medicaid for insurance, but she’s losing her vision from the disease.

“When I was working in fields,” says Deaguilera, “I never had time to take care of myself and my health.”

Workers in the fields who have diabetes often cannot take their insulin because they have no place to refrigerate it, says Marquez. And they miss doctors’ appointments during the busy harvesting seasons because many don’t get paid when they don’t work.

“Most of our patients want just something to relieve the pain and to continue working,” she says. “Most of the time they don’t ask for disability. They don’t ask for days off. They say they don’t have time to miss days.”

6a02d_farm_workers_health-1_wide-cac7a51b5ecbfffd1b29b8c763d4742913a2065d-s1100-c15 Farmerworkers' Health Problems Increase As Workforce Gets Older ...

Field laborers often delay health care, and that can lead to serious medical problems. Compared to older whites, older Latino farmworkers are much more likely to end up in the hospital, according to researchers at the Central Valley Health Policy Institute at California State University, Fresno.

Faced with an aging and dwindling workforce, Mission Ranches’ McKinsey says farmers are trying to mechanize planting and harvesting to reduce their labor needs.

But machines can only do so much, McKinsey says. You can replace the human hand in a factory, perhaps. But out here, the fields are bumpy and the winds are strong and you need people to bring the plants to life.

Sarah Varney is a senior national correspondent at Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service that is part of the nonpartisan Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Nvidia Driver Problems: Bug Causes Performance Loss For Linux Users

 

 

Graphics card maker Nvidia confirmed what gamers have suspected for some time: the company’s products experience a significant loss in performance on Linux operating systems, and Nvidia drivers appear to be the culprit.

A representative for Nvidia confirmed Wednesday that the drivers for the Linux operating system have exposed a bug in the memory manager software that helps allocate resources for the graphics card. The issue has resulted in uneven performance from the graphics processing unit.

“We’ve been tracking it internally as bug 1963500. There was a change, introduced in our r378 branch, to the logic of allocation of certain textures, but it apparently exposed a bug in our memory manager,” Nvidia software engineer Arthur Huillet said in a forum post. “Our next release branch, r390, will carry a workaround, and we’re still working on finding and fixing the root cause.”

The issue was raised by a Nvidia customer posting under the username HeavyHDx. The user highlighted the performance loss experienced when using GNOME, an open source desktop environment for Linux operating systems.

Benchmarking and performance tests run by the user showed a significant drop off in framerate when using GNOME compared to Openbox, an alternative, and highlight customizable Linux desktop environment.

According to HeavyHDx’s tests, the Nvidia graphics card achieved 47 fps with driver version 375.82, released earlier this year. The most recent driver, version 387.34 achieved just 34 fps with the same card and same system set up.  Additional benchmarking tests produced similar results, with the new driver consistently achieving a worse framerate compared to when operated with a previous driver.

For gamers and media buffs alike, framerate per second is an important measurement. A frame is a single, still image. Put them together and there begins to be movement. A standard movie is usually filmed at 24 fps and television is typically broadcast at 30 or 60 fps.

Most video game makers try to produce games at no less than 30 fps. Running a game at a lower framerate runs the risk of creating a title that looks choppy and is difficult to follow on screen. Most gamers, especially those in competitions, prefer a higher framerate as it provides a faster and more complete view of the game world.

Linux-based gamers who use the GNOME desktop environment, like HeavyHDx, have been getting less-than-ideal framerates from Nvidia graphics cards—an issue that not only affects gameplay but also means they aren’t getting what they paid for out of the graphics card.

Luckily, Nvidia has promised a new series of drivers will include a fix that will help provide the expected performance the cards would typically achieve. Those drivers, identified as the 390 series, will first be made available as a beta before the end of the year, according to a representative from Nvidia.

Apple iPhone X problems: Common problems and how to fix them – Pocket

Now that people are getting their hands on the iPhone X, many are struggling to understand some of the new features and gestures, while others are realising that that there a few problems to overcome too.

The iPhone X is undoubtedly the biggest and boldest change to the iPhone so far. In our review of the device, we praised its stunning OLED display, compact size, premium build quality, wireless charging capability, and Face ID unlocking feature. At £999, one would expect perfection, but, of course, nothing is perfect – not even the latest and greatest from Apple.

Here are a few problems you might have encountered and how to solve them.

According to Apple, the new iPhone X has the most durable glass ever used on a phone, thanks to a strengthening layer that is 50 per cent deeper. However, SquareTrade, a company that provides additional warranties for devices, recently put the phone through its breakability tests and ultimately determined that the glass back and lack of a home button make it “the most breakable iPhone ever.”

Pocket-lint can also confirm the iPhone X seems really fragile. Our US news editor had the phone for 3 days, wrapped in a case, and still managed to somehow crack the front glass without ever dropping it.

Depending on how it’s cracked you might be able to get a free replacement, so get on the phone double quick to your carrier or the store you bought it from. If you’ve just been stupid and dropped it, then you should probably hope you’ve got insurance, or have gone with O2 in the UK. The UK network is offering one free screen replacement with some contracts. 

Apple
  • Making sure your phone is always running the latest version of iOS
  • Use auto-brightness to automatically adjust the brightness of the display. It’s on by default can you can check the settings by going to Settings, General, Accessibility, Display Accommodations
  • Set your iPhone X to turn off the display when not using it
  • Avoid displaying static images at maximum brightness for long periods of time

Apple said its new device-unlocking feature, Face ID, would recognise you even if your appearance abruptly changes due to things like beards, hats, scarves, glasses, contact lenses, and sunglasses. However it doesn’t work when a scarf is wrapped over your mouth. It’s wintertime, and we’ve tested this; it doesn’t work. 

You’re lying in bed and you want to unlock iPhone X. No problem, the iPhone works in the dark, and with your eyes full of sleep, but what Face ID isn’t capable of is working when the iPhone is held landscape. To open your Apple smartphone with the swanky new facial recognition software you have to hold the phone out in front of you in portrait. 

Apps that haven’t been optimised for the iPhone X show massive “software bezels” – black borders – at the top and bottom, basically making the phone look like the iPhone 8. Many apps aren’t updated yet, including Google Maps, Google Calendar, YouTube Kids, Skype, Spotify, even Kim Kardashian’s beauty app, to name a few. They all run with software bezels, though, in time we suspect they’ll update, but if the experience isn’t up to what you expected, have a chat with the individual app maker rather than Apple. 

There were early reports of a problem with iPhone X causing the display to be unresponsive in the cold. Apple responded saying that they knew about the problem and promptly issued software update to fix the problem. That update would take you to iOS 11.1.2.

Apple iPhone X problems: Common problems and how to fix them – Pocket

Now that people are getting their hands on the iPhone X, many are struggling to understand some of the new features and gestures, while others are realising that that there a few problems to overcome too.

The iPhone X is undoubtedly the biggest and boldest change to the iPhone so far. In our review of the device, we praised its stunning OLED display, compact size, premium build quality, wireless charging capability, and Face ID unlocking feature. At £999, one would expect perfection, but, of course, nothing is perfect – not even the latest and greatest from Apple.

Here are a few problems you might have encountered and how to solve them.

According to Apple, the new iPhone X has the most durable glass ever used on a phone, thanks to a strengthening layer that is 50 per cent deeper. However, SquareTrade, a company that provides additional warranties for devices, recently put the phone through its breakability tests and ultimately determined that the glass back and lack of a home button make it “the most breakable iPhone ever.”

Pocket-lint can also confirm the iPhone X seems really fragile. Our US news editor had the phone for 3 days, wrapped in a case, and still managed to somehow crack the front glass without ever dropping it.

Depending on how it’s cracked you might be able to get a free replacement, so get on the phone double quick to your carrier or the store you bought it from. If you’ve just been stupid and dropped it, then you should probably hope you’ve got insurance, or have gone with O2 in the UK. The UK network is offering one free screen replacement with some contracts. 

Apple
  • Making sure your phone is always running the latest version of iOS
  • Use auto-brightness to automatically adjust the brightness of the display. It’s on by default can you can check the settings by going to Settings, General, Accessibility, Display Accommodations
  • Set your iPhone X to turn off the display when not using it
  • Avoid displaying static images at maximum brightness for long periods of time

Apple said its new device-unlocking feature, Face ID, would recognise you even if your appearance abruptly changes due to things like beards, hats, scarves, glasses, contact lenses, and sunglasses. However it doesn’t work when a scarf is wrapped over your mouth. It’s wintertime, and we’ve tested this; it doesn’t work. 

You’re lying in bed and you want to unlock iPhone X. No problem, the iPhone works in the dark, and with your eyes full of sleep, but what Face ID isn’t capable of is working when the iPhone is held landscape. To open your Apple smartphone with the swanky new facial recognition software you have to hold the phone out in front of you in portrait. 

Apps that haven’t been optimised for the iPhone X show massive “software bezels” – black borders – at the top and bottom, basically making the phone look like the iPhone 8. Many apps aren’t updated yet, including Google Maps, Google Calendar, YouTube Kids, Skype, Spotify, even Kim Kardashian’s beauty app, to name a few. They all run with software bezels, though, in time we suspect they’ll update, but if the experience isn’t up to what you expected, have a chat with the individual app maker rather than Apple. 

There were early reports of a problem with iPhone X causing the display to be unresponsive in the cold. Apple responded saying that they knew about the problem and promptly issued software update to fix the problem. That update would take you to iOS 11.1.2.

If you’re addicted to diagnosing your health problems online, you might be suffering from cyberchondria

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It’s the Grim Reality of Frequent Work Travel: Health Problems

In 2011, Catherine Richards, a doctor at Boston Health Economics, and Dr. Andrew Rundle, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University, co-authored a report, “Business Travel Linked to Obesity and Poor Health,” published by the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia.

That study tracked the body mass index; levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, what’s known as “bad” cholesterol; and self-rated healthiness of more than 13,000 business travelers. Dr. Rundle, who has just completed a follow-up study, said the new findings, currently under peer review, “are pretty much the same as the old ones,” he said. ‘What we’re seeing is kind of like a U-shaped curve. People who travel the most and people who don’t travel at all have the worst health.”

An explanation for nontravelers’ poor health may be that chronic conditions prevent them from boarding planes in the first place, he said. The culprits of the poor health among constant travelers are the usual suspects: bad airport food, uneven exercise habits and jet lag. If there is a sweet spot, Dr. Rundle said, it may be with those who travel for work only a few times a year.

Dr. Rundle, who lives in western Massachusetts and commutes to Manhattan about five days a month, said he was inspired to look into the health effects of professional travel by his own experience. On a business trip, he said, he learned his options were limited to ordering dinner from a Cheesecake Factory restaurant. “I was just, like, this is not good,” he said. “Catherine and I started looking at business travelers’ B.M.I. data.”

Photo

6abb9_28ITINERARIES2-master675 It's the Grim Reality of Frequent Work Travel: Health Problems

Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky consults with a patient at the TravelWell clinic in Atlanta, where she is the director. She said patients tend to hide from their employers and families the toll that travel stress takes on them.

Credit
Melissa Golden for The New York Times

What they found in the initial study was that the average body mass index of travelers who are on the road 21 or more nights a month was higher than in travelers who were away from home one to six nights per month. “For a 6-foot-tall person, the difference amounted to a 10-pound difference in weight.

That finding supports what Dr. Rundle said he suspected was a problem for traveling employees. “If you’re in your 30s and you’re traveling a lot and you’re eating poorly and you have poor access to physical activity, that starts to catch up with you,” he said. “Over the next 10 years or so, the consequences start to become things like high blood pressure and diabetes and obesity. Long-term chronic issues.”

His yet-unpublished sequel study looks more closely at business travelers’ mental health — an area both Dr. Cetron at the C.D.C. and Dr. Chen at the International Society of Travel Medicine said was important but fell outside their purview. It includes factors like alcohol abuse and accidents and injuries caused by lack of sleep and jet lag. “These are things that can have really immediate consequences for yourself and your career,” he said.

Newsletter Sign Up

Continue reading the main story

A Harvard Business Review article in 2015 noted that frequent business travel accelerates aging and increases the likelihood of suffering a stroke or heart attack, and that more than 70 percent of business travelers report some symptoms of an unhealthy lifestyle, including poor diet, lack of exercise, excess drinking, stress, mood swings and gastrointestinal problems. “All of which impair job performance,” it said.

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

If corporations are taking note, they’re not always taking action. “Travelers themselves are concerned about their health and the amount of time they’re away from home,” said Greeley Koch, executive director of the Association of Corporate Travel Executives, a nonprofit organization with board members from companies including MasterCard and Tesla. Policies to limit travel, or to make it less toxic through measures like upgrades to business class or added time for taking in fresh air during a work trip, depend on bosses and are entirely unregulated, he said. “It’s really a mixed bag when it comes to addressing these issues. It depends on the company.”

Doctors like Phyllis Kozarsky, a professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at Emory University School of Medicine and the medical director of TravelWell, a clinic in Atlanta for international travelers, said they see the need for more company attention to the issue.

“A lot of times, I’ll have people come in and say, ‘I was in so-and-so country, and I think I have a sinus infection,’” she said. “Then when I close the door to the exam room, they’ll burst out crying. They made the appointment ostensibly for a sinus infection, but they’re so tired and worn out from traveling that they just need to see someone and talk about it. They don’t want to share it with their business because they’re concerned about walking up the corporate ladder and their ability to succeed.”

Sharing tales of travel weariness at home may not be an option, either.

“I’ll hear things like, ‘My kid had a performance last week and my husband’s upset with me because I wasn’t there,’ or ‘I can’t do this any more and I don’t know how to tell my family,’” Dr. Kozarsky said. “You’re leaving people at home who are not happy you’re gone for a number of reasons, and when you get home you’re trying to catch up on all the things that happened while you were gone, but all you can think about is how tired you are. The only thing you can do as a doctor is to reassure them, to give people permission to feel the way they’re feeling.”

A frequent traveler, Brian Kelly, founder of the Points Guy, a digital platform for travel tips, said his world had been “flipped upside-down” when his dog had an illness recently. “It makes me sick to my stomach to think of leaving him. I have this business, and I have all these events I need to go to, but all I want to do is stay home and take care of my dog. In the back of my mind I know I need to take a 30-day health break,” he said.

Such a break would set off its own work-related stressors, though, he said.

And that is in keeping with what Dr. Centron of the C.D.C. has been seeing.

“Things are merging and changing in the world of business travel,” he said. “Whether trips are frequent short ones or long ones, the intensity of travel schedules is putting people under a lot of pressure.”

Continue reading the main story

It’s the Grim Reality of Frequent Work Travel: Health Problems

In 2011, Catherine Richards, a doctor at Boston Health Economics, and Dr. Andrew Rundle, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University, co-authored a report, “Business Travel Linked to Obesity and Poor Health,” published by the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia.

That study tracked the body mass index; levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, what’s known as “bad” cholesterol; and self-rated healthiness of more than 13,000 business travelers. Dr. Rundle, who has just completed a follow-up study, said the new findings, currently under peer review, “are pretty much the same as the old ones,” he said. ‘What we’re seeing is kind of like a U-shaped curve. People who travel the most and people who don’t travel at all have the worst health.”

An explanation for nontravelers’ poor health may be that chronic conditions prevent them from boarding planes in the first place, he said. The culprits of the poor health among constant travelers are the usual suspects: bad airport food, uneven exercise habits and jet lag. If there is a sweet spot, Dr. Rundle said, it may be with those who travel for work only a few times a year.

Dr. Rundle, who lives in western Massachusetts and commutes to Manhattan about five days a month, said he was inspired to look into the health effects of professional travel by his own experience. On a business trip, he said, he learned his options were limited to ordering dinner from a Cheesecake Factory restaurant. “I was just, like, this is not good,” he said. “Catherine and I started looking at business travelers’ B.M.I. data.”

Photo

6abb9_28ITINERARIES2-master675 It's the Grim Reality of Frequent Work Travel: Health Problems

Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky consults with a patient at the TravelWell clinic in Atlanta, where she is the director. She said patients tend to hide from their employers and families the toll that travel stress takes on them.

Credit
Melissa Golden for The New York Times

What they found in the initial study was that the average body mass index of travelers who are on the road 21 or more nights a month was higher than in travelers who were away from home one to six nights per month. “For a 6-foot-tall person, the difference amounted to a 10-pound difference in weight.

That finding supports what Dr. Rundle said he suspected was a problem for traveling employees. “If you’re in your 30s and you’re traveling a lot and you’re eating poorly and you have poor access to physical activity, that starts to catch up with you,” he said. “Over the next 10 years or so, the consequences start to become things like high blood pressure and diabetes and obesity. Long-term chronic issues.”

His yet-unpublished sequel study looks more closely at business travelers’ mental health — an area both Dr. Cetron at the C.D.C. and Dr. Chen at the International Society of Travel Medicine said was important but fell outside their purview. It includes factors like alcohol abuse and accidents and injuries caused by lack of sleep and jet lag. “These are things that can have really immediate consequences for yourself and your career,” he said.

Newsletter Sign Up

Continue reading the main story

A Harvard Business Review article in 2015 noted that frequent business travel accelerates aging and increases the likelihood of suffering a stroke or heart attack, and that more than 70 percent of business travelers report some symptoms of an unhealthy lifestyle, including poor diet, lack of exercise, excess drinking, stress, mood swings and gastrointestinal problems. “All of which impair job performance,” it said.

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

If corporations are taking note, they’re not always taking action. “Travelers themselves are concerned about their health and the amount of time they’re away from home,” said Greeley Koch, executive director of the Association of Corporate Travel Executives, a nonprofit organization with board members from companies including MasterCard and Tesla. Policies to limit travel, or to make it less toxic through measures like upgrades to business class or added time for taking in fresh air during a work trip, depend on bosses and are entirely unregulated, he said. “It’s really a mixed bag when it comes to addressing these issues. It depends on the company.”

Doctors like Phyllis Kozarsky, a professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at Emory University School of Medicine and the medical director of TravelWell, a clinic in Atlanta for international travelers, said they see the need for more company attention to the issue.

“A lot of times, I’ll have people come in and say, ‘I was in so-and-so country, and I think I have a sinus infection,’” she said. “Then when I close the door to the exam room, they’ll burst out crying. They made the appointment ostensibly for a sinus infection, but they’re so tired and worn out from traveling that they just need to see someone and talk about it. They don’t want to share it with their business because they’re concerned about walking up the corporate ladder and their ability to succeed.”

Sharing tales of travel weariness at home may not be an option, either.

“I’ll hear things like, ‘My kid had a performance last week and my husband’s upset with me because I wasn’t there,’ or ‘I can’t do this any more and I don’t know how to tell my family,’” Dr. Kozarsky said. “You’re leaving people at home who are not happy you’re gone for a number of reasons, and when you get home you’re trying to catch up on all the things that happened while you were gone, but all you can think about is how tired you are. The only thing you can do as a doctor is to reassure them, to give people permission to feel the way they’re feeling.”

A frequent traveler, Brian Kelly, founder of the Points Guy, a digital platform for travel tips, said his world had been “flipped upside-down” when his dog had an illness recently. “It makes me sick to my stomach to think of leaving him. I have this business, and I have all these events I need to go to, but all I want to do is stay home and take care of my dog. In the back of my mind I know I need to take a 30-day health break,” he said.

Such a break would set off its own work-related stressors, though, he said.

And that is in keeping with what Dr. Centron of the C.D.C. has been seeing.

“Things are merging and changing in the world of business travel,” he said. “Whether trips are frequent short ones or long ones, the intensity of travel schedules is putting people under a lot of pressure.”

Continue reading the main story

It’s the Grim Reality of Frequent Work Travel: Health Problems

In 2011, Catherine Richards, a doctor at Boston Health Economics, and Dr. Andrew Rundle, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University, co-authored a report, “Business Travel Linked to Obesity and Poor Health,” published by the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia.

That study tracked the body mass index; levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, what’s known as “bad” cholesterol; and self-rated healthiness of more than 13,000 business travelers. Dr. Rundle, who has just completed a follow-up study, said the new findings, currently under peer review, “are pretty much the same as the old ones,” he said. ‘What we’re seeing is kind of like a U-shaped curve. People who travel the most and people who don’t travel at all have the worst health.”

An explanation for nontravelers’ poor health may be that chronic conditions prevent them from boarding planes in the first place, he said. The culprits of the poor health among constant travelers are the usual suspects: bad airport food, uneven exercise habits and jet lag. If there is a sweet spot, Dr. Rundle said, it may be with those who travel for work only a few times a year.

Dr. Rundle, who lives in western Massachusetts and commutes to Manhattan about five days a month, said he was inspired to look into the health effects of professional travel by his own experience. On a business trip, he said, he learned his options were limited to ordering dinner from a Cheesecake Factory restaurant. “I was just, like, this is not good,” he said. “Catherine and I started looking at business travelers’ B.M.I. data.”

Photo

6abb9_28ITINERARIES2-master675 It's the Grim Reality of Frequent Work Travel: Health Problems

Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky consults with a patient at the TravelWell clinic in Atlanta, where she is the director. She said patients tend to hide from their employers and families the toll that travel stress takes on them.

Credit
Melissa Golden for The New York Times

What they found in the initial study was that the average body mass index of travelers who are on the road 21 or more nights a month was higher than in travelers who were away from home one to six nights per month. “For a 6-foot-tall person, the difference amounted to a 10-pound difference in weight.

That finding supports what Dr. Rundle said he suspected was a problem for traveling employees. “If you’re in your 30s and you’re traveling a lot and you’re eating poorly and you have poor access to physical activity, that starts to catch up with you,” he said. “Over the next 10 years or so, the consequences start to become things like high blood pressure and diabetes and obesity. Long-term chronic issues.”

His yet-unpublished sequel study looks more closely at business travelers’ mental health — an area both Dr. Cetron at the C.D.C. and Dr. Chen at the International Society of Travel Medicine said was important but fell outside their purview. It includes factors like alcohol abuse and accidents and injuries caused by lack of sleep and jet lag. “These are things that can have really immediate consequences for yourself and your career,” he said.

Newsletter Sign Up

Continue reading the main story

A Harvard Business Review article in 2015 noted that frequent business travel accelerates aging and increases the likelihood of suffering a stroke or heart attack, and that more than 70 percent of business travelers report some symptoms of an unhealthy lifestyle, including poor diet, lack of exercise, excess drinking, stress, mood swings and gastrointestinal problems. “All of which impair job performance,” it said.

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

If corporations are taking note, they’re not always taking action. “Travelers themselves are concerned about their health and the amount of time they’re away from home,” said Greeley Koch, executive director of the Association of Corporate Travel Executives, a nonprofit organization with board members from companies including MasterCard and Tesla. Policies to limit travel, or to make it less toxic through measures like upgrades to business class or added time for taking in fresh air during a work trip, depend on bosses and are entirely unregulated, he said. “It’s really a mixed bag when it comes to addressing these issues. It depends on the company.”

Doctors like Phyllis Kozarsky, a professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at Emory University School of Medicine and the medical director of TravelWell, a clinic in Atlanta for international travelers, said they see the need for more company attention to the issue.

“A lot of times, I’ll have people come in and say, ‘I was in so-and-so country, and I think I have a sinus infection,’” she said. “Then when I close the door to the exam room, they’ll burst out crying. They made the appointment ostensibly for a sinus infection, but they’re so tired and worn out from traveling that they just need to see someone and talk about it. They don’t want to share it with their business because they’re concerned about walking up the corporate ladder and their ability to succeed.”

Sharing tales of travel weariness at home may not be an option, either.

“I’ll hear things like, ‘My kid had a performance last week and my husband’s upset with me because I wasn’t there,’ or ‘I can’t do this any more and I don’t know how to tell my family,’” Dr. Kozarsky said. “You’re leaving people at home who are not happy you’re gone for a number of reasons, and when you get home you’re trying to catch up on all the things that happened while you were gone, but all you can think about is how tired you are. The only thing you can do as a doctor is to reassure them, to give people permission to feel the way they’re feeling.”

A frequent traveler, Brian Kelly, founder of the Points Guy, a digital platform for travel tips, said his world had been “flipped upside-down” when his dog had an illness recently. “It makes me sick to my stomach to think of leaving him. I have this business, and I have all these events I need to go to, but all I want to do is stay home and take care of my dog. In the back of my mind I know I need to take a 30-day health break,” he said.

Such a break would set off its own work-related stressors, though, he said.

And that is in keeping with what Dr. Centron of the C.D.C. has been seeing.

“Things are merging and changing in the world of business travel,” he said. “Whether trips are frequent short ones or long ones, the intensity of travel schedules is putting people under a lot of pressure.”

Continue reading the main story

How to reduce your internet clutter problems

How much time have you wasted in this year on slow download speeds and annoying internet ads that follow you no matter where you surf online? In fact, have you ever looked at the number of tracking cookies on your browser? Chances are it’s in the thousands. Would you like to put an end to it all?

Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari — everyone is familiar with the pain that comes from using the big four browsers — the ads, the tracking cookies and the frustratingly slow download times.

If you’re sick and tired of having your privacy invaded and would like to increase your upload speed on your laptop and other digital devices, check out a new browser from Brave (Brave.com, also available for IOS and Android).

Brave is the brainchild of Brendan Eich, the creator of JAVA code and the former CEO of Mozilla (Firefox).
A case study: How bad is it?
I decided to install Brave on my iPhone and my Macbook Pro to see how much it blocked based upon my user patterns in a 24-…