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Duke University Hospital president leaving for Johns Hopkins Health System

Kevin Sowers, who started his health care career at Duke University Medical Center as an oncology nurse 32 years ago and rose to president of Duke University Hospital, has been named president of the $8 billion Johns Hopkins Health System in Baltimore.

Sowers, 56, was selected by Johns Hopkins trustees on Friday and will assume his new position on Feb. 1 as president of the Johns Hopkins Health System and as executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Sowers will replace Ronald Peterson, who headed Johns Hopkins for 44 years, as president of a health care system that comprises six hospitals in Maryland, Washington and Florida, and includes a staff of more than 40,000.

“It’s an honor to be selected as the CEO of a world-class hospital with such highly skilled and dedicated faculty and staff,” Sowers said in a DukeHealth release. “I’m committed to furthering the hospital’s mission of providing excellence in patient care through the clinical translation of innovative research, while maintaining a health operational and financial foundation.”

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Paul Rothman, CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine and dean of the medical faculty, called Sowers a “visionary leader” with a deep understanding of academic medical centers. Sowers will work with Rothman in overseeing the hospital system that includes more than 40 outpatient primary health care sites, managed care plans, and global management and consulting services.

Fresh out of college in 1985 with a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the Capital University School of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio, Sowers joined Duke as an staff oncology nurse and received his first of many promotions, to assistant head nurse, the following year. In 1989, Sowers got a Master of Science in Nursing from Duke. In recent years he has been an adjunct professor at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business.

Before he became president of of the 957-bed flagship Duke University Hospital, Sowers had been the hospital’s chief operating officer and interim CEO for Durham Regional Hospital. His 43-page resume includes extensive publications, national and international consulting roles, research, honors, presentations and professional affiliations.

Sowers will be joined in Baltimore by his partner, Anthony Evans.

Duke University Hospital president leaving for Johns Hopkins Health System

Kevin Sowers, who started his health care career at Duke University Medical Center as an oncology nurse 32 years ago and rose to president of Duke University Hospital, has been named president of the $8 billion Johns Hopkins Health System in Baltimore.

Sowers, 56, was selected by Johns Hopkins trustees on Friday and will assume his new position on Feb. 1 as president of the Johns Hopkins Health System and as executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Sowers will replace Ronald Peterson, who headed Johns Hopkins for 44 years, as president of a health care system that comprises six hospitals in Maryland, Washington and Florida, and includes a staff of more than 40,000.

“It’s an honor to be selected as the CEO of a world-class hospital with such highly skilled and dedicated faculty and staff,” Sowers said in a DukeHealth release. “I’m committed to furthering the hospital’s mission of providing excellence in patient care through the clinical translation of innovative research, while maintaining a health operational and financial foundation.”

Never miss a local story.

Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access.

Paul Rothman, CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine and dean of the medical faculty, called Sowers a “visionary leader” with a deep understanding of academic medical centers. Sowers will work with Rothman in overseeing the hospital system that includes more than 40 outpatient primary health care sites, managed care plans, and global management and consulting services.

Fresh out of college in 1985 with a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the Capital University School of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio, Sowers joined Duke as an staff oncology nurse and received his first of many promotions, to assistant head nurse, the following year. In 1989, Sowers got a Master of Science in Nursing from Duke. In recent years he has been an adjunct professor at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business.

Before he became president of of the 957-bed flagship Duke University Hospital, Sowers had been the hospital’s chief operating officer and interim CEO for Durham Regional Hospital. His 43-page resume includes extensive publications, national and international consulting roles, research, honors, presentations and professional affiliations.

Sowers will be joined in Baltimore by his partner, Anthony Evans.

Duke University Hospital president leaving for Johns Hopkins Health System

Kevin Sowers, who started his health care career at Duke University Medical Center as an oncology nurse 32 years ago and rose to president of Duke University Hospital, has been named president of the $8 billion Johns Hopkins Health System in Baltimore.

Sowers, 56, was selected by Johns Hopkins trustees on Friday and will assume his new position on Feb. 1 as president of the Johns Hopkins Health System and as executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Sowers will replace Ronald Peterson, who headed Johns Hopkins for 44 years, as president of a health care system that comprises six hospitals in Maryland, Washington and Florida, and includes a staff of more than 40,000.

“It’s an honor to be selected as the CEO of a world-class hospital with such highly skilled and dedicated faculty and staff,” Sowers said in a DukeHealth release. “I’m committed to furthering the hospital’s mission of providing excellence in patient care through the clinical translation of innovative research, while maintaining a health operational and financial foundation.”

Never miss a local story.

Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access.

Paul Rothman, CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine and dean of the medical faculty, called Sowers a “visionary leader” with a deep understanding of academic medical centers. Sowers will work with Rothman in overseeing the hospital system that includes more than 40 outpatient primary health care sites, managed care plans, and global management and consulting services.

Fresh out of college in 1985 with a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the Capital University School of Nursing in Columbus, Ohio, Sowers joined Duke as an staff oncology nurse and received his first of many promotions, to assistant head nurse, the following year. In 1989, Sowers got a Master of Science in Nursing from Duke. In recent years he has been an adjunct professor at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business.

Before he became president of of the 957-bed flagship Duke University Hospital, Sowers had been the hospital’s chief operating officer and interim CEO for Durham Regional Hospital. His 43-page resume includes extensive publications, national and international consulting roles, research, honors, presentations and professional affiliations.

Sowers will be joined in Baltimore by his partner, Anthony Evans.

CRN Exclusive: Channel Chief Veteran Dunsire Named President Of Arlington Computer Products

Scott Dunsire, a 25-year channel chief veteran who was named one of the top five sales leaders in 2017 by CRN, is taking a job as president of Midwest solution provider powerhouse Arlington Computer Products.

Dunsire, who for the past decade has driven robust channel sales growth at both Hewlett Packard Enterprise and HP, takes the helm with the Buffalo Grove, Ill., company on the march to double sales over the next three years.

Dunsire, a highly respected channel veteran who has been a  fixture on CRN’s annual Most Influential Channel Chiefs list, said he was attracted to the job by the no-holds-barred “customer-first” culture put in place by ACP CEO Arly Guenther.

[Related: 30 Notable IT Executive Moves: November 2017]

“The relationships that Arly and the team have built with customers are unbelievable,” said Dunsire, who has followed the rise of the 33-year-old ACP from a catalog product provider into an award-winning CRN Tech Elite 250 enterprise solution provider. “What attracted me to ACP is the great culture. ACP has been delivering for customers for over 30 years. That says a lot about the culture that Arly has built. It is a customer-first culture. It is all about making sure you do whatever you have to in order to keep customers happy. Everything starts with meeting the needs of the customer.”

Dunsire said he is looking forward to spending a lot of time over the next 30 days meeting with customers, ACP employees, and vendor and distribution partners. “I am going to spend a lot of time listening to understand what do we do well and what do we need to do more of,” he said. “This has been a very successful reseller for over 30 years. I am not here to change the world. I am here to enhance and improve upon the great things that ACP has already done.”

While at HPE, Dunsire was credited for delivering across-the-board improvements and stepped-up commitment in every channel segment. Before his role at HPE, he was vice president and general manager of U.S. Channels and SMB Printing and Personal Systems for HP, and a vice president of U.S. Business Channels for Lexmark.

Dunsire said his more than 25 years driving channel sales with partners of all sizes has provided him with the skills to move to the other side of the fence overseeing the day-to-day sales and operations of a $100 million solution provider business. “I have spent so much time in the channel working with different partners that I know what works and what doesn’t work,” he said. “I am indebted to HPE and HP for the opportunities that they gave me that prepared me for this job. It’s a team sport. I am looking forward to leveraging my connections and contacts in both the vendor and distribution communities.”

Dunsire takes over day-to-day responsibilities as ACP is making significant investments to drive the business into the cloud era. “We are going to focus first and foremost on growing the business organically through practice areas like security, managed and professional services, cloud and device as a service,” he said.

With top-tier partnerships with HPE, HP, Dell EMC, VMware, Cisco and Palo Alto Networks, Dunsire said vendor engagement and distribution partnerships will be key to the company’s growth. “Bringing new technologies to customers in conjunction with vendors and distributors is one area I will focus on,” he said. “We are going to look at services and what we can do with distribution to be more efficient.”

ACP will also double down on vendor strategic account planning and engagement with vendor end-user sales teams and top executives, said Dunsire. “Targeting the right set of vendors to work with that fits our skill set allows us to bring the right solutions to our customers,” he said. “This is about bringing discipline to the process. Making sure we have a more holistic approach to how we measure the relationships with vendors and customers is an area I am going to focus on. There has to be a cadence.”

President Trump’s Mental Health Is Deteriorating Amid Mueller Investigation, ‘Morning Joe’ Claims

President Donald Trump could be suffering from stress and diminished mental capacities, MSNBC’s Morning Joe contributors suggested Thursday.

On Wednesday, the president appeared to slur words during a speech announcing his decision to move the U.S. Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem. The show’s contributors now question his physical fitness, saying they partly attributed Trump’s condition to the stress of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into whether the Trump campaign acted inappropriately in reaching out to Russia before the 2016 election.

Political commentator Mike Barnicle said “that impairment is chilling” to see in a president. The White House has dismissed questions about the struggled speech, saying Trump had a dry throat.

“When you consider [President Trump’s] age, his physical condition, he does not look in great physical shape and hasn’t for some time,” Barnicle said. “The anxiety, the worry, the burden of knowing that Bob Mueller and the special prosecutor is out there investigating nearly every aspect of his life and his family’s financial life—and the fact that, you know, he doesn’t really know the mechanics, the nuts and bolts, of what he’s talking about a lot of times.”

56b87_1207trumpspeech President Trump's Mental Health Is Deteriorating Amid Mueller Investigation, 'Morning Joe' Claims Political commentators on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” have questioned President Donald Trump’s physical fitness. Getty Images

Co-host Mika Brzezinski observed that Trump “seemed like he was almost hanging on to the prompter and hanging on to the words.” She said the “struggle” was scary to see, though White House spokesman Raj Shah rejected the idea that Trump was suffering from any ailments during the speech.

“His throat was dry,” Shah said. “There’s nothing to it.” 

The most recent speculation about Trump’s physical health comes one week after co-host Joe Scarborough questioned whether Trump was struggling with early stages of dementia. Scarborough remarked that Winston Churchill “was at the top of his game” at 71 and expressed doubt that Trump’s speech could have diminished so rapidly, unless he was losing his mental capacity. 

Scarborough’s mother struggled with dementia for a decade. The MSNBC host continues to worry that Trump is showing a similar pattern with outlandish behavior, a perceived mental decline and inability to speak. 

Scarborough suggested last week that Trump was “mentally unfit” after the president implied in a tweet that Scarborough killed his intern in 2001. When Scarborough was a Republican congressman in Florida, his intern, Lori Klausutis, was found dead in his district office after falling and hitting her head. A medical examiner did not find signs of foul play, and there is no evidence that Scarborough had anything to do with the death.

“There are many things that you don’t take personal from people who are struggling with certain issues because their personality changes,” Scarborough said. “That’s something I’ve dealt with in my family, and you sit there and say, ‘OK, that’s not the person I knew.’… In this case, Donald Trump has control of nuclear weapons, and if we can’t talk about this now…I don’t know when we can talk about it.”

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President Donald Trump’s newfound lisp sets internet aflame

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While President Trump delivered a landmark speech in which he recognized Jerusalem as Israel’s capital Wednesday, listeners couldn’t help but notice a strange moment during his announcement.

Shortly after the 45th president announced plans to relocate the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, he began to spark conversation on social media for a different reason after seeming to display a newfound lisp.

SEE ALSO: Trump awkwardly drinks from water bottle, sends social media into frenzy

He became the first U.S. president in 70 years to recognize the city as Israel’s capital, but the clarity of his words appeared to drift sideways after he began slurring.

Many online are speculating that the 71-year-old was either having trouble keeping a mouthpiece — namely, a retainer or dentures — in place towards the end of his remarks.

And other Twitter users had different theories for the president’s slurred speech.

Click through more reactions below:

Up Next

See Gallery




President Donald Trump’s newfound lisp sets internet aflame

43699_http%253A%252F%252Fo.aolcdn.com%252Fhss%252Fstorage%252Fmidas%252Fb9fe2866f581ed4614260b834fb5afa6%252F205927420%252FRTX3M8OQ President Donald Trump's newfound lisp sets internet aflame

While President Trump delivered a landmark speech in which he recognized Jerusalem as Israel’s capital Wednesday, listeners couldn’t help but notice a strange moment during his announcement.

Shortly after the 45th president announced plans to relocate the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, he began to spark conversation on social media for a different reason after seeming to display a newfound lisp.

SEE ALSO: Trump awkwardly drinks from water bottle, sends social media into frenzy

He became the first U.S. president in 70 years to recognize the city as Israel’s capital, but the clarity of his words appeared to drift sideways after he began slurring.

Many online are speculating that the 71-year-old was either having trouble keeping a mouthpiece — namely, a retainer or dentures — in place towards the end of his remarks.

And other Twitter users had different theories for the president’s slurred speech.

Click through more reactions below:

Up Next

See Gallery




Philippine president vows to get to the bottom of dengue vaccine ‘health scam’

MANILA (Reuters) – The office of the Philippine president on Sunday vowed to hold accountable those responsible for a suspended dengue immunization program, which it said placed thousands of lives at risk.

The Department of Health (DOH) halted on Friday the use of a dengue vaccine made by Sanofi after the company said its use must be strictly limited due to evidence it can worsen the disease in people who have not previously been exposed to the infection.

“We will leave no stone unturned in making those responsible for this shameless public health scam which puts hundreds of thousands of young lives at risk accountable,” Presidential spokesman Harry Roque said in a statement.

More than 730,000 children, ages 9 and up, received one dose of the Dengvaxia vaccine last year. The immunization program is in line with the recommendation of the World Health Organization for mass vaccination in highly endemic countries, health officials said on Friday.

Although dengue is not as serious as malaria, it is spreading rapidly in many parts of the world. The virus kills about 20,000 people a year and infects hundreds of millions.

While Sanofi’s Dengvaxia is the first-ever approved vaccine for dengue, scientists already recognized it was not perfect and did not protect equally against the four different types of the virus in clinical tests.

A new analysis from six years of clinical data showed that Dengvaxia vaccine provides persistent protective benefit against dengue fever in those who had prior infection.

But for those not previously infected by the virus, more cases of severe disease could occur in the long term following vaccination upon a subsequent dengue infection, Sanofi said.

Roque said there had been no reported case of “severe Dengue infection” since the vaccine was administered and called on the public “not to spread information that may cause undue alarm.”

Health Secretary Francisco Duque has said his department would track the medical history of the thousands of children who were vaccinated and intensify its surveillance to ensure proper care would be given to anyone who may need it.

Senators said over the weekend they would call for an investigation into the dengue immunization program to find out what actions the government needed take to protect those who may be exposed to the drug’s negative effect.

Senator JV Ejercito, chairman of the Senate’s committee on health, told reporters he wanted to know as well if there was any irregularity in the procurement of the vaccine.

Sanofi Philippines said it would issue a statement on Monday.

Reporting by Karen Lema; Editing by Mark Potter

New president named at Ascension Crittenton and Genesys Health System



Chris Palazzolo has been named as president and CEO of Ascension Crittenton hospital and Genesys Health System.

Palazzolo has been serving as president and CEO of Ascension Michigan’s mid-Michigan ministries since 2016.

“Chris’s long experience with Ascension will be an incredible asset in further integrating our newest hospital into our national ministry. He has a demonstrated record of partnering successfully with physicians; his strategic and operations acumen is a longstanding strength and Chris is a model of servant leadership,” said Gwen MacKenzie, senior vice president of Ascension Healthcare and Ascension Michigan ministry market executive.

Palazzolo led Genesys Health System in roles including president and CEO, chief operating officer and chief financial officer from 2008 to 2016. Before joining Genesys, Palazzolo served as chief financial officer and chief operating officer of Ascension’s St. John Hospital and Medical Center and senior vice president and chief financial officer of the Detroit Medical Center.

“I am both excited and honored by this opportunity to continue to help lead our culture of healthcare transformation, innovation and clinical excellence across these renowned institutions,” said Palazzolo.

Ascension Crittenton Hospital is located at 1101 W. University Drive in Rochester Hills.

More information about Ascension Crittenton is available here.

Oppose Alex Azar, President Trump’s Pick for Health and Human Services Secretary

EDITOR’S NOTE:nbspThis article is part of The Nation’s Take Action program, which we use to point our readers toward actions they can take on the issues we cover. To get actions like this in your inbox every Tuesday, sign up for Take Action Now.

What’s Going On?

President Donald Trump has said that large pharmaceutical companies are “getting away with murder” by charging astronomical prices for vital medications. But his nominee for secretary of Health and Human Services, Alex Azar, was CEO of pharma giant Eli Lilly when the company more than tripled the price of insulin that people with diabetes need to stay alive.

According to a study by T1International, people with type 1 diabetes in the United States already spend more on insulin than people in any other country. As James Elliott wrote at The Nation, Eli Lilly’s prices have had deadly consequences because people ration their insulin when they are unable to afford enough of it.

Meanwhile, Eli Lilly is currently under investigation for price fixing and has been accused of colluding with other manufacturers to raise the price of insulin. The lawsuit states that in the last five years alone Sanofi, Novo Nordisk, and Eli Lilly have raised the prices on their drugs by more than 150 percent. Despite the fact that the medication has been around for decades, the cost continues to skyrocket.

What Can I Do?

With Azar’s Senate hearing coming up on November 29, we need urgent action if we’re going to stop him. The Nation has joined with T1International, a charity that advocates for people with type 1 diabetes and that does not accept money from pharmaceutical companies, to call on the Senate to reject Azar’s nomination as Health and Human Services Secretary. Here are three ways you can join us:

1. Write to your senators to demand that they reject Azar’s nomination. We list some suggested language but you can also edit the letter to make it your own.

2. Call your senators at 202-224-3121. Demand that they reject Azar’s nomination.

3. Read James Elliott’s article at The Nation and spread the word about Azar’s history by sharing it on Facebook and Twitter.

This is how the internet (and the President) reacted to the UCLA basketball players’ post-China press conference

On Wednesday morning, LiAngelo Ball, Cody Riley and Jalen Hill spoke during a press conference following their return from China after being arrested there last Tuesday for shoplifting. During the press conference, they expressed their apologies to their families, the university, teammates and coaches and also thanked President Donald Trump (just like he wanted them to).

It was also announced that the three players will be suspended indefinitely from the UCLA men’s basketball team.

After this ruling came in, Twitter flooded with reactions to the punishment, the player’s appologies and the shoplifting scandal itself.

John Oliver on Trump: ‘An iPhone would be a more coherent president’

“Trump’s presidency is like one of his handshakes: it pulls you in whether you like it or not,” said John Oliver at the start of a reluctantly Trump-themed episode of Last Week Tonight.

“He’s had so many terrible moments this year you’ve probably forgot about a lot of them,” he added, before going through a laundry list of faux pas including telling Brigitte Macron she was in “good shape” and when his own golf resort was promoted on the state department’s website.

This week the comic focused on Trump’s unorthodox way of communicating with the American people and how that has influenced how they communicate themselves.

“It definitely doesn’t help that so often what Trump says is complete nonsense,” said Oliver. “We often read transcripts of Trump’s speeches, and it’s something that everyone should actually do once in a while. When you strip away his blindingly confident delivery and just read his words, it is staggering how incoherent he is.”

Oliver went on to play his audience a verbatim transcription of Trump’s comments about the Iranian nuclear agreement. “That is not a functional use of language. That is a drunk driver crashing a pickup truck full of alphabet soup.”

He added: “Trump’s actual speech patterns sound like when you write a long text by choosing only the predictive text your iPhone chooses for you.”

“An iPhone would be a more coherent president of the United States.”

The host said the real issue with Trump was not the fact that he was barely understandable by traditional English language standards, but that he used that as part of three key techniques to insulate himself from criticism.

The first approach Trump uses is delegitimising the media, according to Oliver, who said: “Trump has been using the term ‘fake news’ since he called his mum ‘daddy’. She told him he was wrong, he cried ‘fake news’ and shit his pants.”

The second is “whataboutism”, AKA “changing the subject to focus on someone else’s perceived wrongdoing”. Oliver said the technique was actually an old Soviet propaganda tool and that Trump used it when he referred to the “alt-left” in Charlottesville rather than simply condemning the murder of a protester by a neo-Nazi.

“It is a depressingly effective tool,” said Oliver. “The problem with ‘whataboutism’ is that it doesn’t actually solve a problem or win an argument. The point is just to muddy the waters.

“That brings us to Trump’s third technique: trolling.” Oliver added that Trump might be the first troll to be elected president, and that he retweeted someone calling him the greatest troll on Twitter, saying it was a “great compliment”.

“It isn’t,” said Oliver. “Sometimes if you do something to make a lot of people mad, and bear with me here, it’s because you’re a dick.

“There’s nothing new about any of these techniques. They’re now coming out of the Oval Office, which not only legitimises them but risks them spreading.”

Slovenia’s internet savvy president Borut Pahor wins second term after abysmal turnout mars runoff vote

Ljubljana: Slovenia’s internet-savvy president Borut Pahor won a second term in a runoff vote that was marred by an abysmally low turnout.

Centre-left ex-premier Pahor, 54, had been touted to win in October, but a record low 44-percent turnout triggered a repeat vote, with 1.7 million people called back to the ballot box.

On Sunday, Pahor, who took 47.1 percent in the first round, garnered 53.1 percent of the ballot in which turnout was around 40.1 percent, according to near-complete results.

His rival Marjan Sarec, a 39-year-old former comic actor and now a local mayor portraying himself as anti-establishment, gained 46.9 percent. He had 24.9 percent in the first round.

5f68c_Borut-Pahor-Slovenia_380_AP Slovenia's internet savvy president Borut Pahor wins second term after abysmal turnout mars runoff vote

File image of the President of Slovenia Borut Pahor. AP

The presidency is largely ceremonial in the small EU country.

Polls published on Friday by the Dnevnik and Delo dailies put Pahor on 52-56 percent against 44-47 percent for Sarec.

“Pahor has been rather defensive in the run-off, underlining his achievements, merits and friends, which has seemed unattractive,” analyst Miha Kovac said after a final televised debate on Thursday.

“That could turn against him, in particular if turnout is low,” he said on state television.

Dubbed the “Instagram president” by the media, former model Pahor hiked around the country to campaign for re-election, chatting to supporters and posting photos and videos to his 40,000 Instagram fans.

However, his detractors call him “Barbie”, and Slovenia’s first president Milan Kucan accused Pahor of cheapening the role of head of state and using it for self-promotion.

Pahor stepped down as prime minister in 2011 after his government collapsed at the height of the global financial crisis that drove eurozone member Slovenia close to needing a bailout.

But the following year he won a surprise victory in presidential elections as an independent backed by the Social Democrats, part of the ruling coalition of Prime Minister Miro Cerar.

Slovenia now boasts one of the EU’s most impressive growth rates, with four per cent growth forecast for 2018.

<!– #Borut pahor#Instagram president#Ljubljana#Marjan sarec#Milan kucan#Newstracker#Prime minister miro cerar#Slovenia –>

ABC President: Conor McGregor Assaulted Referee, Jeopardized Fighters’ Health

Jeff Bottari/Zuffa LLC/Getty Images

The president of the Association of Boxing Commissions and head regulator of the Bellator 187 event Mike Mazzulli has accused UFC star Conor McGregor of assaulting the referee and jeopardising the health of the fighters during his controversial appearance in Dublin on Friday.  

Marc Raimondi of MMAFighting.com shared the full statement. Here’s Mazzulli’s view of the events:

“Mr. Conor McGregor who was a spectator at the time, disrupted the event by scaling the cage prior to the conclusion of the bout. Mr. McGregor’s conduct jeopardized the health and safety of the bout participants by delaying necessary medical attention to the fighters that were injured during the round. 

“In addition, Mr. McGregor assaulted Referee Mark Goddard and a Bellator staff.”

McGregor attended the Bellator 187 event in support of his team-mate Charlie Ward, and he jumped the cage after he beat John Redmond. Referee Marc Goddard tried to stop him from doing so, leading to a confrontation in which some shoving occurred. 

The Notorious also confronted staffer Mike Johnson and appeared to punch him. Bellator shared video of parts of the incident:

As reported by Raimondi, McGregor has a history with Goddard. At UFC Gdansk, the referee had him removed from the vicinity cage and back to his seating area during a fight between team-mate Artem Lobov and Andre Fili. The UFC lightweight champion also got into hot water for directing anti-gay slurs at Fili.

McGregor hasn’t fought in the UFC since his win over Eddie Alvarez at UFC 205 in November of last year.

He was a vice president at UNT Health Science Center. Now he’s a sex offender

Editor’s note: This story contains graphic descriptions.

A former UNT Health Science Center vice president accused of inappropriately touching his child’s 15-year-old babysitter in 2015 will have to register as a sex offender for 10 years following a plea deal reached in the case.

Stephen D. Barrett, 42, pleaded guilty on Oct. 23 to attempted indecency with a child by contact, a third-degree felony, in exchange for four years deferred adjudication probation.

Though a conviction will not show on his record if he successfully completes his probation, under Texas law he will still be required to register as a sex offender for 10 years.

“We always try to take into account the family’s wishes when a young person is involved, as to whether a child will have to testify,” said Samantha Jordan, a spokeswoman with the Tarrant County district attorney’s office.

“This plea required the defendant admit guilt, register as a sex offender for 10 years, and participate in a closely monitored sex offender counseling program and substance abuse evaluation.”

Barrett’s defense attorneys could not immediately be reached for comment.

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How to search for sex offenders on your trick-or-treat route (or any other time)

Lots of children will be roaming the streets on Oct. 31, and for parents – the scariest part of Halloween could be not knowing about potential sex offenders in the neighborhood. Here’s a tutorial to check the area.

Texas Department of Public Safety

Barrett had been vice president of operations for the UNT Health Science Center since 2010.

He was fired on October 12, 2016, the same day that Fort Worth police arrested him on a warrant in the case. He was originally charged with indecency with a child/fondling, a second-degree felony.

The teen told police that Barrett had slow music playing when she arrived at his home in July 2015 to babysit his child, according to an arrest warrant affidavit by Detective W.K. Maddox.

She told investigators that Barrett appeared to be flirting with her and asked her, “How adventurous are you?” She accused Barrett of kissing her on the neck and rubbing her thigh and vagina over her clothing, according to the affidavit.

The teen told investigators that she told Barrett to stop, then texted her mother asking to be picked up immediately.

The mother picked up both her daughter and Barrett’s child from the home.

She told investigators that she did not, however, immediately report the incident because she believed Barrett was going to get counseling. She contacted police in September 2015, however, because she felt he was not “cooperating sufficiently,” the affidavit states.

In an interview with Child Protective Services in October 2015, Barrett blamed his behavior on intoxication. He told investigators that he had been hung over and didn’t feel well when the teen had come to his house and decided to have another drink to help feel better.

He said he remembers sitting next to the girl on the couch but not his actions toward her.

“Stephen related that it was clear he ‘did something outlandish’ while he was intoxicated,” Maddox wrote in the affidavit.

The teen had told police that Barrett did not smell of alcohol, nor did he appear in an altered mental state during the encounter.

The case had originally been assigned to Dennis Hutchins, a former detective in the Crimes Against Children unit who was later fired over his mishandling of investigations. It was reassigned to Maddox in May 2016, as part of a task force review of Hutchins’ cases.

Deanna Boyd: 817-390-7655, @deannaboyd

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Watch video of a Texas man accused of exposing himself to a girl getting arrested

Dash cam footage released by the Irving Police Department shows Kenneth Roblez, 38, attempt to avoid being pulled over by an officer. About a minute later his vehicle is cutoff in a parking lot by an undercover in an unmarked vehicle forcing him to stop.

Prescotte Stokes III

pstokes@star-telegram.com

President Carter: Lack of Universal Healthcare Should Be a ‘National Scandal’

Gro Harlem Brundtland is a former Prime Minister of Norway and former Director-General of the World Health Organisation. Jimmy Carter is a former President of the United States of America. Both are members of The Elders, a group of independent leaders, founded by Nelson Mandela ten years ago, who work together for peace, justice and human rights. The Elders are campaigning with civil society partners for UHC as part of the #WalkTogether initiative, highlighting courageous moral leadership in communities around the world. Dr Brundtland is Deputy Chair of The Elders. President Carter is an Elder Emeritus.

“Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” are the inalienable rights at the heart of the Declaration of Independence of the United States of America. The text is as dear today to the hearts of the American people as it was when Thomas Jefferson first penned his words nearly two and a half centuries ago.

But these fundamental rights are denied to millions of Americans because they do not enjoy one of the essential foundations of a fair society: the right to health.

Universal Health Coverage (UHC) is a target defined in the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and it is achieved when everybody receives the health care they need without suffering financial hardship.

Twice in the last five years, all countries of the world have gathered in New York and committed themselves to achieve this noble goal, and it is the explicit health priority of the World Bank and the World Health Organization.

The Elders – the group of independent former leaders founded by Nelson Mandela, of which we have the honor to be members – has been campaigning for UHC at a global and national level for the past two years. We believe that it is as vital an issue for the US as it is for any other country in the world, and that with bold leadership from national and state leaders, it could and should become a reality.

Even after the Affordable Care Act slashed the number of uninsured Americans by about 20 million, another 28 million still lack any health insurance coverage. Many millions more who do have insurance still face unaffordable co-payments whenever they use health services.

In 2010, before the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, an estimated 26,000 Americans died prematurely due to their lack of health coverage.

This represents a violation of basic human rights. Millions of Americans cannot live healthy lives, or protect their children from illness or disease.

In a country as rich as the United States, blessed with talented medical professionals, world-class hospitals and research institutes, and an almost unparalleled capacity for technological innovation, the lack of universal health coverage should be a national scandal.

It is all the more scandalous given the extremely high cost of the US health care system, which takes up 17.1 percent of Gross National Product. This is 40 percent higher than the average for high-income countries, but the heavy reliance on private financing leads to severe inefficiencies and inequalities within the system. Around a third of health expenditure is spent on administrative costs rather than infrastructure or patient care.

None of this is inevitable, and a viable alternative is close at hand. For US neighbors and allies such as Canada and the United Kingdom, UHC has been a cherished element of the social contract between government and citizens for decades. UHC is also now an explicit Sustainable Development Goal of all countries, and some developing countries such as Thailand and Sri Lanka are already covering their entire populations.

Why should Americans not enjoy the same health rights as citizens of other countries around the globe? Why does the US have a lower life expectancy than Costa Rica (which has UHC), and a higher maternal mortality rate than Kazakhstan? Why should health care costs remain the biggest cause of bankruptcy in the US, thwarting the hopes and ambitions of hardworking families?

The answer is quite simple: commercial self-interest.

The US healthcare industry, pharmaceutical companies and private insurance firms have assiduously lobbied for decades at state and federal levels to protect their business interests. Their spokespeople and spin doctors distort arguments, so that concepts that are commonplace in almost every other industrialized country are portrayed as outlandish and dangerous.

Challenging this consensus takes political courage and commitment.

President Obama’s health reforms were a step in the right direction, especially in making health insurance mandatory, and not allowing insurance companies to exclude people with pre-existing conditions. Millions of American women also benefited from accessing free family planning services on their health insurance plans thanks to the Affordable Care Act.

But the tide has turned in the White House over the past twelve months, leading the health care debate into treacherous waters. President Trump seems intent on dismantling his predecessor’s reforms, through successive executive orders, including a halt on federal funding to provide health insurance coverage for nine million vulnerable children.

What gives us hope, however, is that the American people do not agree with this approach. A recent poll in The Economist shows that 60 percent of Americans want to see publicly-funded Medicare expanded to cover all citizens, and some political leaders are beginning to respond to their voters’ concerns.

States including California, Ohio, Colorado, Vermont and New York are all seeing moves to bring publicly-financed UHC at a state level. We urge them to lead the way.

The chaos and paralysis surrounding health reform on Capitol Hill must not be an excuse for vested interests to regain the initiative and block progress. Responsible leaders and citizens must come together and demand Americans enjoy the same rights to health as their fellow global citizens.

The Elders will stand in solidarity with you to make Jefferson’s dream a reality.

President Trump Blames Mental Illness For Mass Shooting, Not …

11962_mental-health-trump_custom-b0b48e308b339236182f12da9451635ab605cb66-s1100-c15 President Trump Blames Mental Illness For Mass Shooting, Not ...

At a press conference in Japan on Monday, President Donald Trump blamed mental illness, not guns, for the Texas massacre.

Anadolu Agency/Getty Images


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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

At a press conference in Japan on Monday, President Donald Trump blamed mental illness, not guns, for the Texas massacre.

Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Devin Kelley, the man we now know killed more than two dozen people at a Texas church on Sunday, escaped a mental health facility before the Air Force could try him on charges that he beat his wife and baby stepson back in 2012.

And President Trump, like many people before him, is pointing to mental health — not guns — as the cause of the church massacre.

“Mental health is your problem here. This was a very, based on preliminary reports, this was a very deranged individual, a lot of problems over a long period of time. We have a lot of mental health problems in our country, as do other countries,” he said in a news conference in Japan on Monday.

11962_mental-health-trump_custom-b0b48e308b339236182f12da9451635ab605cb66-s1100-c15 President Trump Blames Mental Illness For Mass Shooting, Not ...

And yet the statistics don’t bear this out. Yes, some people with mental illness become mass shooters but most people with mental health problems — which is estimated to be up to 18 percent of adults, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation — do not.

All Things Considered host Kelly McEvers talked with NPR health policy correspondent Alison Kodjak about the Trump administration’s record on mental health care.

McEvers: So I want to start first with a fact check on what President Trump said — and other politicians too — that there’s a direct link between gun violence and mental health. What do the experts say?

Actually, most mental health professionals would dispute that, says Kodjak.

In fact, “there is no real connection between an individual with a mental health diagnosis and mass shootings. That connection according to all experts doesn’t exist,” says Bethany Lilly of the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law.

“Having all of our attention focused on mental illness is not particularly helpful,” Daniel Webster, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research in Baltimore, Md., told NPR Monday.

An issue brief from the Bazelon Center, written back in 2013 after the Newtown, Conn., massacre, says it’s unfair to tie the two. “We know how to enable individuals with significant psychiatric disabilities to succeed,” the paper says. It says services such as supported employment and housing, er very effective at keeping people with mental illness out of emergency rooms, psychiatric hospitals and jails.

“Affording people with serious mental illnesses the services they need is a critical goal, but it is not a solution to gun violence,” the report says.

That’s not to say that people who commit mass shooting never suffer from mental health issues, Kodjak points out, in Texas and in other shootings.

But research shows that people who suffer from mental health issues such as bipolar disorder or anxiety are no more likely than the average person to become violent. And people with mental illness are ten times more likely to be victims of violent crime, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

McEvers: So what about the record of this White House on mental health?

One of the first thing President Trump did after taking office was to repeal an Obama administration rule that blocked gun sales to some people with mental health diagnoses.

As far as mental health care goes — the president’s record isn’t very strong if you measure it by where he puts federal money, Kodjak says.

He supports repealing the affordable Affordable Care Act, which for the first time required insurance companies to cover mental health care. The law also expanded that coverage to millions of people who didn’t have it before.

McEvers: So a repeal of Obamacare could reduce access to mental health care. What other policies are being considered that might affect those who need mental health services?

The biggest is the proposed cuts to Medicaid that have been in all the GOP health care bills. They would reducing future Medicaid spending by hundreds of billions of dollars.

Today Medicaid pays for about 27 percent of mental health services, according to Lilly of the Bazelon Center, so cutting the program that much is likely to take money away from mental health care for the poor, Kodjak says.

BRIEF-Fukui Computer Holdings announces change of president

Nov 7(Reuters) – Fukui Computer Holdings Inc

* Says it appoints Harukatsu Hayashi as new president of the company to replace Masaru Fukino, effective Nov. 7

Source text in Japanese:goo.gl/PimCk7

Further company coverage: (Beijing Headline News)

The Internet Is Celebrating the 9-Year Anniversary of the Day Obama Was Elected President

Yesterday (November 4, 2017) marked the nine-year anniversary of the 2008 presidential election in which Barack Obama was elected the 44th President of the United States — and the country’s first black president. The historic victory culminated with his iconic “Yes We Can” speech, which was delivered at Grant Park in Chicago. “Tonight,” Obama said at the time, “because of what we did on this date, in this election, at this defining moment — change has come to America.”

Many people are now looking back to that moment and sharing their nostalgia for that night in 2008, especially in light of the United States’s current presidential administration. “Nine years ago today Barack Obama was elected President,” one person tweeted, adding: “And he remains MY president.” Another Twitter user made a joke about Daylight Saving’s Time, writing: “It’s very sad we were unable to fall back nine years, instead of one hour. I MISS PRESIDENT OBAMA!” Ahead, check out some of the ways people are celebrating the nine-year anniversary of Obama’s historic win, while wishing they had a time machine to relive it all over again.

Related: If You Have Jury Duty in Chicago, You Might See Barack Obama

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Computer crime defense attorney: whoever deactivated President’s Twitter account could be charged – KGO

Computer crime defense attorney: whoever deactivated President’s Twitter account could be charged Originally, Twitter called President Trump’s account de-activation human error, then later said a Twitter customer support employee did it on his last day. Now, the social media network has tweeted a new message.

“Update: We have implemented safeguards to prevent this from happening again. We won’t be able to share all details about our internal investigation or updates to our security measures, but we take this seriously and our teams are on it.”

“It looks like they had very bad internal controls over who could do what to people’s Twitter accounts which should give pause to any Twitter user,” said New York-based computer crime defense attorney Tor Ekeland via Skype.

Ekeland says the person responsible for disabling President Trump’s Twitter account for 11 minutes may have violated the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

“You could construe the President being unable to access his account as damage under the statute,” said Ekeland.

RELATED: Contract employee identified as culprit for Trump’s Twitter account disappearance

President Trump Tweeted “My Twitter account was taken down for 11 minutes by a rogue employee. I guess the word must finally be getting out and having an impact.”

“You’re talking about the Twitter account of the President of the United States who uses it to talk to 41 million people on a daily basis and this person probably could have tweeted whatever they wanted and maybe even started a war,” said Ekeland.

Steve Gomez, Former FBI Special Agent in Charge and now ABC News Contributor says any disruption to the President’s Twitter account could be disastrous.

RELATED: Internet reacts to brief disappearance of President Donald Trump’s Twitter account

“We are dealing with issues with North Korea, Iran, Syria, and Isis as well,” said Gomez.

A spokesperson with the US Attorney’s Office said he could not confirm the existence or non-existence of an investigation into the President’s Twitter account de-activation.

If charged, under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, Ekeland says the person responsible could face up to 10 years in prison. Ekeland also says Twitter could sue the now former employee civilly, but might not want to because it could mean information about Twitter’s security practices could come out.




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