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‘Safe space’ aims to help people having mental health crisis

9325b__98949856__89622257_johncampion-1 'Safe space' aims to help people having mental health crisis

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Police and crime commissioner John Campion said officers could not be expected to be mental health professionals

People having a mental health crisis who are held by West Mercia Police could now be taken to a “safe space” instead of a cell.

New laws are now in force which limit the time people suffering mental health problems can spend in custody.

An NHS trust says a “safe space” area at Newtown Hospital, Worcester, means officers can be stood down.

The force dealt with more than 5,000 mental health cases in 2017. Its PCC says demand on police “can be reduced”.

West Mercia Police said it was constantly reviewing its own policies.

Gary Morgan, a spokesman for Worcester Health and Care NHS Trust, which runs mental health services in Worcestershire, says the new safe space will have trained mental health experts who can assess patients quickly and plan future care.

It will be a “designated place of safety” for any person detained by police in the county when suffering from a mental disorder.

From 1 January to 27 October this year, officers across Shropshire, Herefordshire and Worcestershire were called out 5,439 times to mental health incidents.

‘Right support’

West Mercia Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) John Campion said officers needed to be able to use their time “keeping communities safe”.

Mr Campion said: “There is a natural link between crime and mental health as it can either make people more vulnerable to crime, or may be an underlying cause for offending.

“That link cannot be eliminated entirely, but I am certain that current levels of demand can be reduced.

“Ensuring that people suffering with mental health issues get the right support is vital.

“Our police are not mental health professionals and we cannot expect them to be, particularly when demands on their time are increasing.”

More older people are doing yoga, but they are also racking up injuries

Yoga may hold a key to aging well, suggests a growing body of research into its potential benefits for body and mind — benefits that include reducing heart rate and blood pressure, relieving anxiety and depression, and easing back pain. One recent study even raised the possibility of positive changes in biological markers of aging and stress in people who do yoga.

So it’s no surprise that the number of yoga practitioners in the United States has more than doubled to 36.7 million over the last decade, with health benefits the main reason people practice, according to the Yoga in America Study conducted last year on behalf of Yoga Journal and the Yoga Alliance.

While yoga enthusiasts are often pictured as young and bendy, the reality, according to the Yoga in America study, is that 17 percent are in their 50s and 21 percent are age 60 and older.

Along with this upsurge of interest has been an upsurge in injuries, particularly among older practitioners. “Participants aged 65 years and older have a greater rate of injury from practicing yoga when compared with other age groups,” researchers wrote last year in a study of nearly 30,000 yoga-related injuries seen in U.S. hospital emergency departments from 2001 to 2014. “While there are many health benefits to practicing yoga, participants and those wishing to become participants should confer with a physician prior to engaging in physical activity and practice only under the guidance of certified instructors.”

As a yoga therapist who has been teaching in medical settings for nearly 20 years, I have found it distressingly common to hear about the negative experiences and injuries people have sustained in yoga classes. The stories my students relate suggest classes that were too difficult for them and/or were taught by an inexperienced or poorly trained instructor. Even instructors who are trained to teach able, young students typically have a limited understanding of safety considerations that are essential when working with middle-aged and older bodies and people with such health challenges as rotator cuff injuries, arthritis, glaucoma, hypertension and heart disease.

Fortunately, there is a growing recognition of the importance of safe yoga practice along with professionalization of the field. To practice yoga while reducing the risks, here are five strategies to help older adults — as well as people with health challenges — age well with yoga:

Start where you are, not where you think you should be. If you are new to yoga, try a beginner’s class — even if you’re fit and active — because yoga is not just about what you do, it’s about how you do it. Unlike Western exercise, the yogic approach is to balance effort with relaxation, which can be surprisingly difficult for many people used to our culture’s emphasis on striving, competing and being “in it to win it.” In fact, learning not to push yourself, or rush, or be ambitious to look a certain way, can be one of the most challenging (and therapeutic) parts of the practice. Give yourself time to learn how to move into a posture to a point where you feel challenged but not strained.

Recognize that styles of yoga vary widely. Yoga classes range from vigorous and athletic to relaxing and restorative — with a confusing array of trendy hybrids such as yoga with goats and kittens, and yoga offered on a paddleboard. To find a class designed for mature bodies, look for names such as “Yoga Over 50,” “Gentle Yoga” or “Senior Yoga.”

Hatha yoga is the name for any type of yoga that teaches physical postures. This means that virtually all yoga classes in the West are hatha yoga. But when a class is marketed as hatha yoga, it generally signifies a non-gimmicky approach to basic postures and breathing, which may be a good starting place. Viniyoga and Kripalu yoga are relatively gentle styles that may be appropriate for people with health concerns. Restorative yoga involves using supports (such as blankets and yoga blocks or bolsters) to prop students into passive poses that promote profound rest. Hospital-based wellness and integrative medicine centers may offer classes designed for people with specific ailments such as cancer or back pain.

Find a well-trained, experienced teacher. Ask prospective instructors about their credentials [see sidebar about yoga credentials], how long they’ve taught yoga and whether they’ve had special training and/or experience teaching older people. Ask to watch a class to see if it’s suitable, which is also a good way to assess the instructor. A good yoga teacher will act as a guide, helping students explore what works best for them as they try each posture. For people with health challenges, working one-on-one with a certified yoga therapist can be ideal.

Talk to your care provider. If you have medical issues, get guidance about specific movement precautions. For example, people with glaucoma may be advised to avoid “head-down” positions, which may increase pressure in the eye. Hot yoga may be problematic for people with heart conditions because high temperatures can increase cardiac workload. Recognize, however, that many doctors know little about yoga and may assume you’re planning to stand on your head. Tell your provider that you’d like to try gentle yoga consisting of simple movements, stretches and breathing practices.

Let go of excuses that you’re too old. You don’t have to be young or fit or flexible to try yoga. If you can breathe, you can practice yoga.

Krucoff is a yoga therapist at Duke Integrative Medicine in Durham, N.C., and co-author of “Relax Into Yoga for Seniors: A Six-Week Program for Strength, Balance, Flexibility and Pain Relief.”

Not enough people know about this amazing way to buy an iPhone X

c572a_iphone-x-iphone-8 Not enough people know about this amazing way to buy an iPhone XIt’s expensive.Justin Sullivan/Getty

 

  • The iPhone X is an extremely expensive device, costing £999 or more if you buy it outright.
  • Most people end up paying much more than this by committing to two-year contracts with their mobile carriers.
  • There’s a better value way of avoiding these costs and buying an iPhone X directly from Apple, called the iPhone Upgrade Programme.
  • It can save you hundreds of pounds versus going through a mobile carrier.

I am an Android user and, for the first time in 13 years, I’m tempted to buy an iPhone. That’s apart from a short blip in 2015 when I bought an 8GB iPhone 5c on a two-year contract, but the less said about that misadventure the better.

It’s the iPhone X that’s close to swinging it for me, despite the eye-watering price. Now that smartphones are so commoditised, it’s hard to pick out a new phone you really feel enthusiastic about — but the iPhone X looks really special.

It’s also very, very expensive, however you choose to buy it.

That’s why I’m amazed more people don’t go through the iPhone Upgrade Programme, which essentially involves buying an iPhone on finance, with 0% interest.

For a 64GB iPhone X and two years of AppleCare+, you pay £56.45 every month for 20 months and an upfront cost of £69. This works out in total as £1,198. You would pay exactly the same amount if you bought the 64GB model upfront for £999, along with two years of AppleCare+.

There’s also the separate iPhone Payments programme, where you can buy the same iPhone X without AppleCare+ for £46.50, plus £69 upfront, which works out at £999. Again, that’s what you’d pay upfront.

This is better value than most other ways of buying a new iPhone X right now.

According to an investor note from Bernstein this week, not many people go through the iPhone Upgrade Programme

That’s despite the obvious advantages.

Firstly, it’s the most immediately affordable way for me to buy the top-of-the-line iPhone right now.

Secondly, once you have made 11 payments towards your iPhone X through the upgrade programme, Apple will let you upgrade to the next phone. You trade in your iPhone X, provided it’s in good condition, and then you get the newest phone. That’s a nice extra for die-hard iPhone fans.

Along with the £56.45-per-month cost of the iPhone X, you would still need to pay your mobile tariff on top. But the advantage of the iPhone Upgrade Programme is that the phone is unlocked — so you can choose a cheap, SIM-only deal. I’m currently paying £14 a month for 12GB of data, plus unlimited call time, with Three, which would make my monthly costs for the iPhone X £70.45 a month.

Don’t get me wrong: it’s still expensive. It’s just works out as a lot less expensive than almost anything else.

Most people are paying too much by buying iPhones through carriers

Most British people still buy their phones on contract, CCS Insight analyst Ben Wood told me a few months ago. That means most people pay for the handset and a mobile tariff in a combined deal. This deal almost invariably works out better for the carrier, because they lock you into a 24-month contract and you end up forking out hundreds of pounds more than if you were on a SIM-only deal. If you break your iPhone and don’t have cover, you’re either stuck with a smashed phone for months, or you have to fork out a lot of money for repairs.

Here’s an illustration: I just told you that my monthly cost for the iPhone X under the upgrade programme will work out as £70.45 a month. Over the 20 months I would be paying for the iPhone X, my total comes to £1,478. Once my year of cheap data with Three is up, I’m free to find another tariff with any mobile provider.

The pay monthly offers I found advertised were much more expensive than this and lock you in for two years.

Here’s an example from EE. If you chose the two-year 3GB iPhone X deal currently advertised on its website, you would end up paying £1,691.75. A direct price comparison is difficult, because that’s over 24 months, not 20 as with my earlier example. But that price excludes any kind of AppleCare-like insurance, or the ability to upgrade halfway through your contract, so it feels like worse value. It’s ultimately at least £200 more than I would be paying, but for less data and less protection.

The pay monthly deals from O2 and, yes, Three look much the same. You end up paying hundreds of pounds more than you need to.

Most people are not committed iPhone bargain hunters

c572a_iphone-x-iphone-8 Not enough people know about this amazing way to buy an iPhone XThe iPhone SE.REUTERS/Stephen Lam

The upgrade programme isn’t for everyone, especially if you’re really committed to finding a bargain.

It seems specifically more designed for people who know they’ll be sticking with Apple, and who want the newest phones every year. That’s not everyone. Upgrading every year is a luxury and, if you think each iPhone is just an incremental update on the last, it may not be worth the extra money. And depending on your view, the upgrade programme is a good way for Apple to push its customers to increasingly more expensive devices.

It’s also worth examining the AppleCare+ coverage closely — it doesn’t cover theft, or loss, for example. 

And if you buy an iPhone X yourself, keep it in mint condition, then sell it when the next iPhone comes out, you’ll ultimately save more money than just handing it back to Apple and upgrading to the next one, as you would with the upgrade programme.

But most people don’t think about all of this — they just go to their carriers and sign up to expensive, limited deals in order to get the latest iPhone. And Apple’s sales attest to the fact that lots of people love buying the new iPhones every year. The upgrade programme is, for now, a better value and underutilised way of doing that.

Not enough people know about this amazing way to buy an iPhone X

c572a_iphone-x-iphone-8 Not enough people know about this amazing way to buy an iPhone XIt’s expensive.Justin Sullivan/Getty

 

  • The iPhone X is an extremely expensive device, costing £999 or more if you buy it outright.
  • Most people end up paying much more than this by committing to two-year contracts with their mobile carriers.
  • There’s a better value way of avoiding these costs and buying an iPhone X directly from Apple, called the iPhone Upgrade Programme.
  • It can save you hundreds of pounds versus going through a mobile carrier.

I am an Android user and, for the first time in 13 years, I’m tempted to buy an iPhone. That’s apart from a short blip in 2015 when I bought an 8GB iPhone 5c on a two-year contract, but the less said about that misadventure the better.

It’s the iPhone X that’s close to swinging it for me, despite the eye-watering price. Now that smartphones are so commoditised, it’s hard to pick out a new phone you really feel enthusiastic about — but the iPhone X looks really special.

It’s also very, very expensive, however you choose to buy it.

That’s why I’m amazed more people don’t go through the iPhone Upgrade Programme, which essentially involves buying an iPhone on finance, with 0% interest.

For a 64GB iPhone X and two years of AppleCare+, you pay £56.45 every month for 20 months and an upfront cost of £69. This works out in total as £1,198. You would pay exactly the same amount if you bought the 64GB model upfront for £999, along with two years of AppleCare+.

There’s also the separate iPhone Payments programme, where you can buy the same iPhone X without AppleCare+ for £46.50, plus £69 upfront, which works out at £999. Again, that’s what you’d pay upfront.

This is better value than most other ways of buying a new iPhone X right now.

According to an investor note from Bernstein this week, not many people go through the iPhone Upgrade Programme

That’s despite the obvious advantages.

Firstly, it’s the most immediately affordable way for me to buy the top-of-the-line iPhone right now.

Secondly, once you have made 11 payments towards your iPhone X through the upgrade programme, Apple will let you upgrade to the next phone. You trade in your iPhone X, provided it’s in good condition, and then you get the newest phone. That’s a nice extra for die-hard iPhone fans.

Along with the £56.45-per-month cost of the iPhone X, you would still need to pay your mobile tariff on top. But the advantage of the iPhone Upgrade Programme is that the phone is unlocked — so you can choose a cheap, SIM-only deal. I’m currently paying £14 a month for 12GB of data, plus unlimited call time, with Three, which would make my monthly costs for the iPhone X £70.45 a month.

Don’t get me wrong: it’s still expensive. It’s just works out as a lot less expensive than almost anything else.

Most people are paying too much by buying iPhones through carriers

Most British people still buy their phones on contract, CCS Insight analyst Ben Wood told me a few months ago. That means most people pay for the handset and a mobile tariff in a combined deal. This deal almost invariably works out better for the carrier, because they lock you into a 24-month contract and you end up forking out hundreds of pounds more than if you were on a SIM-only deal. If you break your iPhone and don’t have cover, you’re either stuck with a smashed phone for months, or you have to fork out a lot of money for repairs.

Here’s an illustration: I just told you that my monthly cost for the iPhone X under the upgrade programme will work out as £70.45 a month. Over the 20 months I would be paying for the iPhone X, my total comes to £1,478. Once my year of cheap data with Three is up, I’m free to find another tariff with any mobile provider.

The pay monthly offers I found advertised were much more expensive than this and lock you in for two years.

Here’s an example from EE. If you chose the two-year 3GB iPhone X deal currently advertised on its website, you would end up paying £1,691.75. A direct price comparison is difficult, because that’s over 24 months, not 20 as with my earlier example. But that price excludes any kind of AppleCare-like insurance, or the ability to upgrade halfway through your contract, so it feels like worse value. It’s ultimately at least £200 more than I would be paying, but for less data and less protection.

The pay monthly deals from O2 and, yes, Three look much the same. You end up paying hundreds of pounds more than you need to.

Most people are not committed iPhone bargain hunters

c572a_iphone-x-iphone-8 Not enough people know about this amazing way to buy an iPhone XThe iPhone SE.REUTERS/Stephen Lam

The upgrade programme isn’t for everyone, especially if you’re really committed to finding a bargain.

It seems specifically more designed for people who know they’ll be sticking with Apple, and who want the newest phones every year. That’s not everyone. Upgrading every year is a luxury and, if you think each iPhone is just an incremental update on the last, it may not be worth the extra money. And depending on your view, the upgrade programme is a good way for Apple to push its customers to increasingly more expensive devices.

It’s also worth examining the AppleCare+ coverage closely — it doesn’t cover theft, or loss, for example. 

And if you buy an iPhone X yourself, keep it in mint condition, then sell it when the next iPhone comes out, you’ll ultimately save more money than just handing it back to Apple and upgrading to the next one, as you would with the upgrade programme.

But most people don’t think about all of this — they just go to their carriers and sign up to expensive, limited deals in order to get the latest iPhone. And Apple’s sales attest to the fact that lots of people love buying the new iPhones every year. The upgrade programme is, for now, a better value and underutilised way of doing that.

Microsoft People app on Windows 10 is once again having sync problems

7eb6b_Microsoft-People-for-Windows-10-Mobile Microsoft People app on Windows 10 is once again having sync problems
Image Courtesy: PocketNow.com.

Microsoft has given up on Windows 10 Mobile platform but they are committed to patching operating system with security updates and fixes till 2019. On October 28, a small group of users reported that Microsoft People app is having sync problems on Windows 10 Mobile. The problem was with non-insider builds too. The bug caused the disappearance of contacts in Windows 10 Mobile’s People app.

Microsoft addressed the issue a few days later with a small update, but the issue has arrived yet again. The server-side bug is only affecting the Windows 10 Mobile devices as the People app continues to function properly in Windows 10 PCs with same Microsoft account.

Many users including the Insiders are complaining that they are having a sync problem again with the People app. Microsoft hasn’t acknowledged the problem yet, although it seems a fairly widespread issue.

There is a fix available but it is not working for all users. To fix the bug, you can sync the contacts in Microsoft People app. It’s worth noting that resetting the Windows Phone handset won’t address this issue.

Since Microsoft has already confirmed that Windows Phone’s feature and hardware is no longer the company’s focus, and as they don’t give Windows Phone users any priority these days, don’t expect a fix anytime soon. You can, however, report this bug on the Feedback Hub and let the team know about the ongoing issues.


Not enough people know about this amazing way to buy an iPhone X

5c6a7_iphone-x-iphone-8 Not enough people know about this amazing way to buy an iPhone XIt’s expensive.Justin Sullivan/Getty

 

  • The iPhone X is an extremely expensive device, costing £999 or more if you buy it outright.
  • Most people end up paying much more than this by committing to two-year contracts with their mobile carriers.
  • There’s a better value way of avoiding these costs and buying an iPhone X directly from Apple, called the iPhone Upgrade Programme.
  • It can save you hundreds of pounds versus going through a mobile carrier.

I am an Android user and, for the first time in 13 years, I’m tempted to buy an iPhone. That’s apart from a short blip in 2015 when I bought an 8GB iPhone 5c on a two-year contract, but the less said about that misadventure the better.

It’s the iPhone X that’s close to swinging it for me, despite the eye-watering price. Now that smartphones are so commoditised, it’s hard to pick out a new phone you really feel enthusiastic about — but the iPhone X looks really special.

It’s also very, very expensive, however you choose to buy it.

That’s why I’m amazed more people don’t go through the iPhone Upgrade Programme, which essentially involves buying an iPhone on finance, with 0% interest.

For a 64GB iPhone X and two years of AppleCare+, you pay £56.45 every month for 20 months and an upfront cost of £69. This works out in total as £1,198. You would pay exactly the same amount if you bought the 64GB model upfront for £999, along with two years of AppleCare+.

There’s also the separate iPhone Payments programme, where you can buy the same iPhone X without AppleCare+ for £46.50, plus £69 upfront, which works out at £999. Again, that’s what you’d pay upfront.

This is better value than most other ways of buying a new iPhone X right now.

According to an investor note from Bernstein this week, not many people go through the iPhone Upgrade Programme

That’s despite the obvious advantages.

Firstly, it’s the most immediately affordable way for me to buy the top-of-the-line iPhone right now.

Secondly, once you have made 11 payments towards your iPhone X through the upgrade programme, Apple will let you upgrade to the next phone. You trade in your iPhone X, provided it’s in good condition, and then you get the newest phone. That’s a nice extra for die-hard iPhone fans.

Along with the £56.45-per-month cost of the iPhone X, you would still need to pay your mobile tariff on top. But the advantage of the iPhone Upgrade Programme is that the phone is unlocked — so you can choose a cheap, SIM-only deal. I’m currently paying £14 a month for 12GB of data, plus unlimited call time, with Three, which would make my monthly costs for the iPhone X £70.45 a month.

Don’t get me wrong: it’s still expensive. It’s just works out as a lot less expensive than almost anything else.

Most people are paying too much by buying iPhones through carriers

Most British people still buy their phones on contract, CCS Insight analyst Ben Wood told me a few months ago. That means most people pay for the handset and a mobile tariff in a combined deal. This deal almost invariably works out better for the carrier, because they lock you into a 24-month contract and you end up forking out hundreds of pounds more than if you were on a SIM-only deal. If you break your iPhone and don’t have cover, you’re either stuck with a smashed phone for months, or you have to fork out a lot of money for repairs.

Here’s an illustration: I just told you that my monthly cost for the iPhone X under the upgrade programme will work out as £70.45 a month. Over the 20 months I would be paying for the iPhone X, my total comes to £1,478. Once my year of cheap data with Three is up, I’m free to find another tariff with any mobile provider.

The pay monthly offers I found advertised were much more expensive than this and lock you in for two years.

Here’s an example from EE. If you chose the two-year 3GB iPhone X deal currently advertised on its website, you would end up paying £1,691.75. A direct price comparison is difficult, because that’s over 24 months, not 20 as with my earlier example. But that price excludes any kind of AppleCare-like insurance, or the ability to upgrade halfway through your contract, so it feels like worse value. It’s ultimately at least £200 more than I would be paying, but for less data and less protection.

The pay monthly deals from O2 and, yes, Three look much the same. You end up paying hundreds of pounds more than you need to.

Most people are not committed iPhone bargain hunters

5c6a7_iphone-x-iphone-8 Not enough people know about this amazing way to buy an iPhone XThe iPhone SE.REUTERS/Stephen Lam

The upgrade programme isn’t for everyone, especially if you’re really committed to finding a bargain.

It seems specifically more designed for people who know they’ll be sticking with Apple, and who want the newest phones every year. That’s not everyone. Upgrading every year is a luxury and, if you think each iPhone is just an incremental update on the last, it may not be worth the extra money. And depending on your view, the upgrade programme is a good way for Apple to push its customers to increasingly more expensive devices.

It’s also worth examining the AppleCare+ coverage closely — it doesn’t cover theft, or loss, for example. 

And if you buy an iPhone X yourself, keep it in mint condition, then sell it when the next iPhone comes out, you’ll ultimately save more money than just handing it back to Apple and upgrading to the next one, as you would with the upgrade programme.

But most people don’t think about all of this — they just go to their carriers and sign up to expensive, limited deals in order to get the latest iPhone. And Apple’s sales attest to the fact that lots of people love buying the new iPhones every year. The upgrade programme is, for now, a better value and underutilised way of doing that.

United Way helps people sign up for health insurance as Alaskan enrollment is up

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (KTUU) – Slick roads can have implications beyond more dangerous conditions for drivers. Jane Straight says that it may also deter people from getting help with health insurance.

Straight is a health insurance navigator with the United Way. For the past three-years she has helped people get health insurance and work through the complexities of the federal government’s health care website. She explains the United Way has received a federal grant to help people since the health insurance marketplace opened.

In the Salmon Meeting Room on the second floor of Loussac Library, Straight sat and waited for whomever would walk through the door. And it’s not just people who struggle with technology who are looking for help: “I think people come into the library for a variety of reasons, sometimes it’s simply for access to a computer. I also think for some people the whole notion of health insurance can be new to them,” says Straight.

Since Alaska signed up to the Medicaid Expansion, Straight has also been checking for Medicaid eligibility and helping people sign up for that program too. Straight says the 2017 open enrollment period has been busier than the last few years. She suspects it could be because of the shortened enrollment period for 2017.

The Alaska Primary Association says 8,300 Alaskans have enrolled in healthcare during the 2017 open enrollment period. By the same point last year, 6,400 people had enrolled in health insurance.

Thursday afternoon at Loussac Library was a little different, Straight suspects the promise of freezing rain and icy roads deterred people from coming. Nevertheless, around half a dozen people walked through her doors looking for help.

26-year-old Skylar Roberts who has lived in and out of Alaska for the last few years came asking about insurance. Roberts is employed and new to the Alaska specifics of the health care system. He’d received multiple letters, notifications and calls and was confused by his eligibility. Straight went through his healthcare.gov account and explained everything he needed to know about health insurance. He left, promising to tell his co-workers how easy it was to sign up.

The open enrollment period for health insurance ends Dec. 15. The United Way will be holding multiple sessions at Loussac Library for people who want help enrolling:

– Dec. 09, 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
– Dec. 13, 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
– Dec. 14, 2:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Straight says appointments can be made at the United Way’s office. People can also call 211, a service for people to be connected to community resources, or phone the health insurance marketplace directly.

Ralphie May’s Cause of Death Has Been Revealed. Here’s What Young People Need to Know

Two months after comedian Ralphie May was found dead in a Las Vegas private residence, the cause of his death has been revealed. May, 45, died from hypertensive cardiovascular disease, Clark County Coroner’s office confirmed today to People.

On October 6, the day May’s body was discovered, May’s manager said in a statement that the Last Comic Standing star had been battling pneumonia and had canceled several recent tour dates in an effort to recover. The coroner’s new diagnosis, however, sheds more light on the underlying cause of May’s health problems, as well as his untimely death.

It can also serve as a reminder that hypertension (also known as high blood pressure) and heart disease can affect people of all ages—and that, if left untreated, they can be deadly, even for people in their 40s or younger.

RELATED: 20 Ways to Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

To learn more about these risks, Health spoke with Brandy Patterson, MD, an assistant professor of cardiology at the University of Virginia. Dr. Patterson did not treat May, but she does have many other patients, including young adults, with high blood pressure and heart disease. Here’s what she wants everyone to know about these conditions, including who’s most at risk and how you can protect yourself.

Hypertension and heart disease are different, but related

Hypertensive cardiovascular disease, which May was diagnosed with after his death, is a broad term that could mean a few different things, says Dr. Patterson. Over time, high blood pressure can lead to heart or vascular disease in several different ways: It can cause hardening of the arteries or a thickening of the heart muscle itself. It can also cause the heart’s chambers to become dilated, which keeps it from pumping blood and oxygen effectively.

“All of these things make it harder for the heart to work and can lead to heart failure,” says Dr. Patterson. Clogged arteries can also trigger blood clots, she adds, which can block the flow of blood and oxygen to the heart. “If the heart muscle is starved of nutrients, that can trigger a heart attack or even death.”

There’s good reason hypertension is called the “silent killer”

Blood pressure, simply put, is the amount of force on the walls of your arteries by the blood flowing through them. If blood pressure gets too high, it strains the walls of the arteries—which can lead to thickening—and puts excess pressure on the heart.

But one big problem, says Dr. Patterson, is that blood pressure isn’t something people can feel on a day-to-day basis. “Nobody feels the force of blood against their artery walls,” she says, “so it’s possible to have no idea this is going on for a long time, until your organs and your heart have been badly damaged.”

RELATED: What Is Cardiac Arrest–and How Is It Different From a Heart Attack?

Once damage to the heart becomes severe, people may begin to have symptoms, like chest pain or trouble breathing while walking or lying down. High blood pressure can also damage other organs, like the kidneys, leading to swelling and rapid weight gain due to fluid retention. It’s possible, though, for this type of damage to build up over years of high blood pressure without any symptoms at all, or for a sudden event like a heart attack or stroke to occur with no warning at all. 

Nearly half of American adults now have hypertension

Just weeks after May’s death, an announcement from the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology highlighted the fact that high blood pressure is not just an issue for older people. Under new guidelines issued in November, the threshold for high blood pressure is now 130/80, down from the previous level of 140/90.

That means that about 103 million Americans—about 46% of the adult population—now meet the criteria for high blood pressure, which should be monitored and treated by a doctor. “The number of men under 55 with hypertension is now triple under these new guidelines, and the number of women under 55 is now double,” says Dr. Patterson.

Diet, exercise, weight, and stress levels affect a person’s risk

Dr. Patterson says physicians are seeing more and more people under the age of 55 with high blood pressure and heart disease, and it’s not just because of changing medical definitions. America’s ongoing obesity epidemic also plays a large role. (May once described himself as a “comedian who happens to be fat,” and he occasionally referenced his weight in his stand-up routines.)

A family history, lack of exercise, poor diet, smoking, and heavy alcohol use are also risk factors for both high blood pressure and heart disease, says Dr. Patterson. “And let’s not forget about stress, which changes the neurotransmitters in the brain and triggers the adrenal glands to produce hormones that increase blood pressure,” she says. “Think about what a comedian does every night: He’s up on stage and everyone’s laughing, but is it stressful? I would imagine so.”

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Know your blood pressure, and your risk factors

May’s death should be a wake-up call to anyone who hasn’t seen a doctor in recent years or doesn’t know their own blood pressure—especially if they have any of the risk factors above, says Dr. Patterson. When caught early, high blood pressure can be treated and managed with medications and lifestyle changes, and many adults with high blood pressure can live long and healthy lives.

Without treatment, however, high blood pressure can wreak havoc throughout the body, she says. “We should be checking patients with risk factors as early as possible,” says Dr. Patterson, “because the damage can start as early as adolescence, and it’s important to address these problems sooner rather than later.”

Health Insurance Challenges for Young People Off Obamacare | Time

Marguerite Moniot felt frustrated and flummoxed, despite the many hours she spent in front of the computer this year reading consumer reviews of health insurance plans offered on the individual market in Virginia. Moniot was preparing to buy a policy of her own, knowing she would age out of her parent’s plan when she turned 26 in October.

She asked her parents for help and advice. But they, too, ran into trouble trying to decipher which policy would work best for their daughter. The family had relied on her father’s employer-sponsored plan through his work as an architect for years, so no one had spent much time sifting through policies.

“Honestly, my parents were just as confused as I was,” said Moniot, a restaurant server in Roanoke.

In defeat, just before Thanksgiving, she went with her mother to meet a certified health insurance navigator, buying a policy that allowed her to keep her current doctors.

A new crop of young people like Moniot are falling off their parents’ insurance plans when they turn 26 — the age when the Affordable Care Act stipulates that children must leave family policies.

They were then expected to be able to shop relatively easily for their own insurance on Obamacare marketplaces. But with Trump administration revisions to the law and congressional bills injecting uncertainty into state insurance markets, that task of buying insurance for the first time this year is anything but simple.

The shortened sign-up period, which started Nov. 1, runs through Dec. 15. That window is half as long as last year’s, hampering those who wait until the last minute to obtain insurance.

Reminders and help are scarcer than before: The federal government cut marketing and outreach funds by $90 million, and federal funding to groups providing in-person assistance was whacked by 40 percent.

“I think it’s definitely going to be difficult. There’s just additional barriers with [less] in-person help, just fewer resources going around,” said Erin Hemlin, director of training and consumer education for Young Invincibles, an advocacy group for young adults.

Emily Curran, a research fellow at Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute, said those actions combined with the Trump administration’s vigorous criticism of the health law could further handicap the uphill battle to entice young people to enroll. As of Nov. 25, nearly 2.8 million people had enrolled through the federal marketplace, according to the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services. The data were not sorted by age.

“There’s already a barrier where young adults are having difficulty understanding what the value of insurance is,” she said. “Coming out … and saying prices are going up, choice is going down and this law is a mess doesn’t really get at the young adult population.”

Trouble attracting young ddults

Before the Affordable Care Act, young adults had the highest uninsured rate of any age group.

The ACA made coverage more affordable and accessible. It allowed states to expand Medicaid to cover single, childless adults. Tax credits to help pay for premiums made plans on the individual market more affordable for people whose incomes fell between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty level (between $12,060 and $48,240 for an individual). And young adults were allowed to stay on their parents’ plan until their 26th birthday.

In all, the uninsured rate dropped to roughly 15 percent among 19- to 34-year-olds in 2016. Still, young adults have not joined the individual market in the numbers as expected. About a quarter of marketplace customers in 2016 were ages 18-34, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. But that age group makes up about 40 percent of the exchanges’ potential market, according to researchers and federal officials.

If the Trump administration’s moves dampen enrollment, insurers could face additional challenges in attracting healthy adults to balance those with illnesses, who drive up costs.

“When you’re relatively healthy, it’s not something that you’re thinking about,” said Sandy Ahn, associate research professor at Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute.

But illness does not recognize age. Dominique Ridley, who turns 26 on Dec. 6, knows this all too well.

Ridley has asthma. She always carries an inhaler and sees a doctor when she feels her chest tighten. The student at Radford University in Virginia relies on her mother’s employer-sponsored plan for coverage.

Ridley started peppering her parents with questions about health insurance as soon as she started seeing ads for this year’s open enrollment.

“I don’t want to just go out there and apply for health insurance, and it be all kinds of wrong and I can’t afford it,” she said.

Her parents didn’t have the answers, but her mother linked up Ridley with a friend that runs a marketing company tailored to promoting the Affordable Care Act. Ridley then connected with a broker who signed her up for a silver plan that will cost her less than $4 per month, after receiving a premium subsidy of more than $500 a month.

“If you don’t have health insurance, you don’t have anything,” Ridley said.

A digital campaign

The Obama administration relied in part on partnerships to attract young enrollees to sign up. Last year, it collaborated with national organizations like Planned Parenthood Federation of America and Young Invincibles on a social media campaign called #HealthyAdulting. Emails, according to Joshua Peck, former chief marketing officer for healthcare.gov, were particularly effective for recruitment.

The Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services, which oversees the marketplaces, said it will focus this year’s resources on “digital media, email and text messages.”

Hemlin said the government has not asked Young Invincibles to assist in marketing. Her group will use its own resources to pay for targeted ads on social media to reach the target demographic, she said.

“But obviously we can’t make up for $90 million in advertising” that’s been cut, said Hemlin.

One factor that might compensate is that 20-somethings are facile at shopping online, said Jill Hanken, director of Enroll! Virginia, a statewide navigator program.

“Our job is to make sure they understand to look at provider networks and drug formularies if they have health concerns. But they’re able to do the mechanics of enrollment on their own very often.”

James Rowley, a 26-year-old entrepreneur from Fairfax, Va., is among those who signed up without help. He started his own company two years ago while covered under his father’s health plan. When he turned 26, he signed up for health insurance on his own through a special enrollment period this year. When general enrollment opened, he once again picked a plan.

“I might not 100 percent need it now, but there will come a time where health insurance is important,” said Rowley.

This story was produced in collaboration with Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation. Carmen Heredia Rodriguez is a Kaiser Health News reporter.

3 top reasons people dump Android for iPhone | Computerworld

As it stands, the market battle between Android and iPhone seems set to continue forever, but you can’t ignore that the majority of users who do switch are abandoning Google for Apple. What follows are three of the biggest reasons for doing so, identified by Creative Strategies, as Apple’s iPhone sales threaten to spike.

Reason #1: Security

I think most people are growing more aware of the need to maintain device security and to keep a fairly steady eye on data security. Apple seems to agree — notice how its Android attack line videos (two included below for reference) are focused around similar reasons?

Security awareness

That’s not always been the case, but thousands of malware attacks and high-profile data breaches such as those form Yahoo and others mean that even smartphone users who aren’t particularly tech savvy have become more aware.

Such awareness wasn’t quite as important at the dawn of the smartphone age earlier this century. In part, this was because those devices — while revolutionary at their time — simply didn’t do as much or carry as much information.

3 top reasons people dump Android for iPhone | Computerworld

As it stands, the market battle between Android and iPhone seems set to continue forever, but you can’t ignore that the majority of users who do switch are abandoning Google for Apple. What follows are three of the biggest reasons for doing so, identified by Creative Strategies, as Apple’s iPhone sales threaten to spike.

Reason #1: Security

I think most people are growing more aware of the need to maintain device security and to keep a fairly steady eye on data security. Apple seems to agree — notice how its Android attack line videos (two included below for reference) are focused around similar reasons?

Security awareness

That’s not always been the case, but thousands of malware attacks and high-profile data breaches such as those form Yahoo and others mean that even smartphone users who aren’t particularly tech savvy have become more aware.

Such awareness wasn’t quite as important at the dawn of the smartphone age earlier this century. In part, this was because those devices — while revolutionary at their time — simply didn’t do as much or carry as much information.

3 top reasons people dump Android for iPhone

As it stands, the market battle between Android and iPhone seems set to continue forever, but you can’t ignore that the majority of users who do switch are abandoning Google for Apple. What follows are three of the biggest reasons for doing so, identified by Creative Strategies, as Apple’s iPhone sales threaten to spike.

Reason #1: Security

I think most people are growing more aware of the need to maintain device security and to keep a fairly steady eye on data security. Apple seems to agree — notice how its Android attack line videos (two included below for reference) are focused around similar reasons?

Security awareness

That’s not always been the case, but thousands of malware attacks and high-profile data breaches such as those form Yahoo and others mean that even smartphone users who aren’t particularly tech savvy have become more aware.

Such awareness wasn’t quite as important at the dawn of the smartphone age earlier this century. In part, this was because those devices — while revolutionary at their time — simply didn’t do as much or carry as much information.

Dan Fagan: Health care not improving outcomes for dead people

Here’s an idea for a new state slogan: “Louisiana: We’re so compassionate even the dead get free health care.” You may have heard that between 2013 and 2017, the state spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on health care for 712 dead people. It didn’t work. They’re still dead.

Legislative Auditor Daryl Purpera’s office released a report this week revealing the Louisiana Department of Health improperly paid $718,000 over four years for dead Medicaid patients. Most of the cash went as premiums to private companies the state uses to oversee services for most of Louisiana’s Medicaid patients.



State Rep. Dustin Miller, D-Opelousas, center, speaks with Reps. Jack McFarland, R-Winnfield, left, and Mark Abraham, R-Lake Charles, during a hearing about proposed Medicaid managed-care contract extensions, which were blocked by House Republicans on Friday, Nov. 3, 2017, in Baton Rouge.


Associated Press Photo by Melinda Deslatte

The Department of Health continued with the payments for the dead despite getting a vital records report daily detailing the names of those who die in Louisiana each day. Chris Magee with the legislative auditor’s office says the computer automation the Department of Health set up did not catch all the names of the deceased and sent out payments on their behalf. Magee says if the department would have run the data manually by simply cross-referencing the names of the dead with names on the Medicaid roll, the payments for health care of the dead would not have gone out. It appears to me manually running the names each day is the only way to guarantee the state no longer sends out money to health care companies for treating the dead.

“A nonzero number is not acceptable to us. Our goal is to get to zero. ” said Andrew Tuozzolo, Louisiana Health Department chief of staff.

Tuozzolo believes the computer can catch all of the names of the deceased on Medicaid roles if all the proper edits are in place but admits it hasn’t worked to perfection thus far. As to why the department doesn’t have someone manually cross-reference the names of the dead with those on the Medicaid roles each day, Tuozzolo said, “If I had more access to more staff, but our staff has been cut in half the past few years.“ Tuozzolo says the Health Department staff has been cut down from roughly 12,000 to 5,000 employees in the past eight years.

In defense of the Louisiana Department of Health, it is making dramatic progress in lowering the number of dead people getting health care payments. Tuozzolo says his department went from paying for the health care of approximately 1,700 dead people per year five years ago to now only a couple of hundred. Oddly enough, the dead people no longer getting free health care in that time span have not complained or lobbied for the reinstatement of their health care benefit. Politicians may have finally found the one group not throwing a fit when you cut off their free stuff.

Medicaid has become such a monstrous government program in Louisiana. When Gov. John Bel Edwards expanded the entitlement program under Obamacare, it brought in 453,000 new dependents in only a year and a half. That’s a considerable growth of the welfare state in Louisiana. Currently, there are approximately 1.6 million people on Medicaid in Louisiana costing taxpayers $14 billion per year. The feds pick up most of that expense now, but more of the expenses will shift to the state as the years go on. To assume the state will one day regret expanding Medicaid and becoming more interlocked with a giant government entitlement program is not a stretch. Ten years from now, history will not remember well Gov. Edwards decision to expand Medicaid.

Government programs grow. It’s what they do. They don’t shrink much. But the growth of Medicaid in Louisiana is completely out of control. In 2012, the state spent $7.7 billion on Medicaid. That number has close to doubled in just five years and now makes up almost half of the state’s $28 billion dollar budget. Now one-third of everyone in Louisiana gets government-funded health care through Medicaid. And not all of the dependents are breathing.

Dan Fagan is a former TV and radio broadcaster who lives in Metairie. Email him at faganshow@gmail.com.

Dan Fagan: Health care not improving outcomes for dead people

Here’s an idea for a new state slogan: “Louisiana: We’re so compassionate even the dead get free health care.” You may have heard that between 2013 and 2017, the state spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on health care for 712 dead people. It didn’t work. They’re still dead.

Legislative Auditor Daryl Purpera’s office released a report this week revealing the Louisiana Department of Health improperly paid $718,000 over four years for dead Medicaid patients. Most of the cash went as premiums to private companies the state uses to oversee services for most of Louisiana’s Medicaid patients.



State Rep. Dustin Miller, D-Opelousas, center, speaks with Reps. Jack McFarland, R-Winnfield, left, and Mark Abraham, R-Lake Charles, during a hearing about proposed Medicaid managed-care contract extensions, which were blocked by House Republicans on Friday, Nov. 3, 2017, in Baton Rouge.


Associated Press Photo by Melinda Deslatte

The Department of Health continued with the payments for the dead despite getting a vital records report daily detailing the names of those who die in Louisiana each day. Chris Magee with the legislative auditor’s office says the computer automation the Department of Health set up did not catch all the names of the deceased and sent out payments on their behalf. Magee says if the department would have run the data manually by simply cross-referencing the names of the dead with names on the Medicaid roll, the payments for health care of the dead would not have gone out. It appears to me manually running the names each day is the only way to guarantee the state no longer sends out money to health care companies for treating the dead.

“A nonzero number is not acceptable to us. Our goal is to get to zero. ” said Andrew Tuozzolo, Louisiana Health Department chief of staff.

Tuozzolo believes the computer can catch all of the names of the deceased on Medicaid roles if all the proper edits are in place but admits it hasn’t worked to perfection thus far. As to why the department doesn’t have someone manually cross-reference the names of the dead with those on the Medicaid roles each day, Tuozzolo said, “If I had more access to more staff, but our staff has been cut in half the past few years.“ Tuozzolo says the Health Department staff has been cut down from roughly 12,000 to 5,000 employees in the past eight years.

In defense of the Louisiana Department of Health, it is making dramatic progress in lowering the number of dead people getting health care payments. Tuozzolo says his department went from paying for the health care of approximately 1,700 dead people per year five years ago to now only a couple of hundred. Oddly enough, the dead people no longer getting free health care in that time span have not complained or lobbied for the reinstatement of their health care benefit. Politicians may have finally found the one group not throwing a fit when you cut off their free stuff.

Medicaid has become such a monstrous government program in Louisiana. When Gov. John Bel Edwards expanded the entitlement program under Obamacare, it brought in 453,000 new dependents in only a year and a half. That’s a considerable growth of the welfare state in Louisiana. Currently, there are approximately 1.6 million people on Medicaid in Louisiana costing taxpayers $14 billion per year. The feds pick up most of that expense now, but more of the expenses will shift to the state as the years go on. To assume the state will one day regret expanding Medicaid and becoming more interlocked with a giant government entitlement program is not a stretch. Ten years from now, history will not remember well Gov. Edwards decision to expand Medicaid.

Government programs grow. It’s what they do. They don’t shrink much. But the growth of Medicaid in Louisiana is completely out of control. In 2012, the state spent $7.7 billion on Medicaid. That number has close to doubled in just five years and now makes up almost half of the state’s $28 billion dollar budget. Now one-third of everyone in Louisiana gets government-funded health care through Medicaid. And not all of the dependents are breathing.

Dan Fagan is a former TV and radio broadcaster who lives in Metairie. Email him at faganshow@gmail.com.

5 computer security facts that surprise most people | CSO Online

The five statements below are the causes behind a lot of computer security risk and exploits. If you understand them well enough today, you will be ahead of your peers.

1. Every company is hacked

When the world hears about the latest big breach, people probably think that the company involved must be bad at computer security. The next time a big hack occurs that results in millions of customer records stolen or millions of dollars in losses, what you should think is “Every company is hacked. This is just the one the media is talking about today.”

Every company is completely and utterly owned by a nefarious hacker or easily could be. That’s just a fact. I’m not including top secret military installations that don’t have Internet and require that their hard drives be placed in a locked safe at the end of every day. I’m talking about the average corporate company or small business.

I’ve never consulted at a company (and I’ve consulted at hundreds) where I didn’t find at least one hacker hidden somewhere when asked to do so. In most cases, especially over the last decade, I found multiple groups that had been in for years. My personal record was eight different hacking groups, with some in as long as ten years.

Why people are fleeing to virtual Germany to escape internet Nazis

The two dates that changed Oolong’s life forever were 24 May 1999 and 8 August 2001. Born in 1994, Oolong had a relatively quiet existence for the first five years of his life. This was mostly because he was a rabbit, but partly because his owner – Hironori Akutagawa – hadn’t yet thought to balance any objects on his head.

24 May 1999 is the day Hironori balanced a film canister on his domestic rabbit’s head. After that, he didn’t stop. In the following years, Hironori balanced and then photographed a number of objects atop of Oolong – including a teapot, a keychain, a toilet paper, and a CD (although, not all at once). These “head performances”, as Hironori called them, at first only attracted a modest number of visitors to his personal site. But then: Oolong was discovered.

“I never imagined the global response that came. I did not promote to anything, and made the website for several acquaintances,” Hironori tells me now, 16 years after Oolong first went viral on 8 August 2001. How did it feel? “I realised the greatness of the internet. I just felt stunned.”

Though Hironori balanced many objects on Oolong’s head over the years, there was one in particular that caught the internet’s eye. A picture of Oolong with a dorayaki (red-bean pancake) on his head was one of the early noughties’ most popular memes. Known as “Pancake Bunny” or “Bunny Wafflehead”, the image was turned into a meme via an absurdist and pithy caption. “I have no idea what you’re talking about, so here’s a bunny with a pancake on its head.”

In many ways, Pancake Bunny was a precursor to some of the internet’s more abstract memes. The image was initially used on message boards to derail conversations or reply to posters who had acted idiotically. Remarkably, a Twitter search proves that many people still use it to this day. But just why did Hironori balance stuff on Oolong’s head in the first place? As he only speaks some English and I don’t speak any Japanese, our interview took place over email with the help of Google Translate.

“It is comfortable to take a little weight,” explains Hironori, who says Oolong looked both pleased and cute when objects were placed on his head. “I noticed that he sat still when I put something like sweets on, so I started photographing it.” Recently in Japan, photos of cats with various things on their head have become exceedingly popular. “My idea was long before,” Hironori says.

As this all took place in the early days of internet memes, Hironori says he did not make any money from his website. In January 2009, a 136-page photography book was published in the Netherlands, featuring every picture of Oolong ever taken, but Hironori gave his permission to publisher and recieved no fee for this. Many modern internet animals generate extreme amounts of money – Doug the Pug is worth half a million dollars, for example, while Grumpy Cat has made its owner an eye-watering £64m. Despite not directly earning any money from Oolong, however, going viral gave Hironori exposure for his work as a photographer, allowing him to do exhibitions, sell postcards, and go on business trips.  

Yet when I ask, overall, if Hironori is happy about his internet fame, he replies: “I do not think that I am completely glad that I have been used as a meme.”

In 2001, the emails started. Some visitors to Hironori’s site had begun complaining that he was being cruel to Oolong, going as far to say he was abusing his pet. “This was never my intention when I included numerous links to photographs, showing Oolong’s unique ability to hold objects on his head. This is not a site to mock rabbits, or demonstrate animal abuse,” Hironori wrote at the time.

When I ask about this now, Hironori calls these critics “ignorant” and “arrogant”, saying one individual even sent him a threatening letter. “I ignored them all and threw it away,” he says, “In most cases, the response from overseas was favourable.” Overall, it seems that Hironori valued anyone who loved and respected Oolong, but had trouble with meme-makers who seemingly mocked the pet.

Oolong is now buried under a pine tree near to Hironori’s house. The oldest rabbit in the world was aged 14, and Oolong died in 2003, aged a respectable 8 years old. “It seemed to be a problem of the heart, he suddenly became sick and it flew by in a flash. It was sad,” says Hironori. He marked the grave with a carrot shaped like a pair of bunny ears.

Unlike many of the memes I have interviewed, Hironori has no desire for further viral fame. He currently has a female rabbit, Bekomochi, but does not have any plans to make her go viral. “I think that Oolong’s talent is still special, so I do not feel like trying to share the subsequent rabbits with the world by setting up a site,” he says.

 “Living the Meme” is a series of articles exploring what happens to people after they go viral. Check out the previous articles here.

To suggest an interviewee for Living the Meme, contact Amelia on Twitter.

5 computer security facts that surprise most people

The five statements below are the causes behind a lot of computer security risk and exploits. If you understand them well enough today, you will be ahead of your peers.

1. Every company is hacked

When the world hears about the latest big breach, people probably think that the company involved must be bad at computer security. The next time a big hack occurs that results in millions of customer records stolen or millions of dollars in losses, what you should think is “Every company is hacked. This is just the one the media is talking about today.”

Every company is completely and utterly owned by a nefarious hacker or easily could be. That’s just a fact. I’m not including top secret military installations that don’t have Internet and require that their hard drives be placed in a locked safe at the end of every day. I’m talking about the average corporate company or small business.

I’ve never consulted at a company (and I’ve consulted at hundreds) where I didn’t find at least one hacker hidden somewhere when asked to do so. In most cases, especially over the last decade, I found multiple groups that had been in for years. My personal record was eight different hacking groups, with some in as long as ten years.

The Internet Is Loving Watching People Step Over Invisible Boxes

The Internet loves its physical challenges. Two that immediately spring to mind are the revolting cinnamon challenge and the planking fad which had us all on the floor in a state of wooden piss-taking.

Now the latest one is the ‘invisible box’ move where people apparently walk in mid-air by stepping onto an ‘invisible box’ with one foot and jumping over it with the other.

The current boom dates back to August of this year, when the Anderson University American football player Dontez Hines uploaded a video on Twitter of him patting down his invisible box, stepping on it and landing on the other side like a boss.

The video quickly went viral and, of course, many others have uploaded their own attempt at scaling their invisible obstacle – to variable success.

The most successful of these was the Manvel High School cheerleader Ariel, who had a go at the move and blew people on social media away.

Like Dontez, Ariel nailed the trick, and has been rewarded with a tweet that has now been re-tweeted over 100,000 times.

However incredible and movie-like it looks, the ‘invisible box’ trick is actually real, which left many Internet users wondering how the fuck it works and where it came from.

The move seems to have been documented as early as August 2014 when Mexican dancer Macros Grados was filmed completing it in a video uploaded to YouTube.

Grados’ performance has now been viewed over 890,000 times, so many people must have taken their mime act from him.

The basis of the stunt seems to be hopping forward with one foot while keeping your ‘stepping’ foot fixed in mid-air – easier said than done.

The man who supercharged the fad doesn’t seem to know much about how he did it either, as Hines told Men’s Health that anyone could perform the move with a little bit of graft.

“It is really nothing special,” Hines said. “I just imagined that there was a box and stepped on it.” Cheers, mate. Really helping me with my technique there.

Men’s Health’s fitness editor, Ebenezer Samuel, was more helpful, explaining that the move needs a “little extra strength and stability” to pull off but is basically a one-legged hop forward with a lot of elevation.

“All his hip stabilizers on the right side are firing on overtime to hold that hip in position,” Samuel said. “You’ll notice his body rotates toward the leg on the step as well; there’s a ton of oblique and ab stability maintaining that position.

“Very explosive hip flexor, abdominal and glute strength is what is driving the leg up and over the box.”

Sounds doable to me. Now, I’m just off to fall on my arse trying to pull it off.

Featured Image Credit: Twitter/thecvmevp

Could you step over an ‘invisible box’? Internet goes wild for new viral trend where people appear to walk on air …

  • Baffling videos have taken social media by storm, people seemingly walking in mid-air by stepping over an invisible box
  • The premise involves stepping onto the ‘box’ with one foot and leaping over it with the other foot
  • Some have performed it to perfection such as Anderson University football player Dontez Hines and Manvel High School cheerleader Ariel 
  • Others hilariously fail, tripping over their own feet or even falling to the ground
  • The trick works by jumping with one foot while keeping your ‘stepping’ foot still
  • So the person hops forward on one foot while keeping the other fixed in mid-air

Mary Kekatos For Dailymail.com

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Baffling videos have taken social media by storm, people seemingly walking in mid-air by stepping over an invisible box.

The premise involves stepping onto an ‘invisible box’ with one foot and leaping over it with the other foot.

Some have performed the trick to perfection such as Anderson University football player Dontez Hines and Manvel High School cheerleader Ariel.

Others hilariously fail, tripping over their own feet or even falling to the ground.  

However, many Internet users have been left dazed and confused wondering how the trick actually works.  

6f5e6_46F3ABA300000578-5141523-image-a-120_1512335456795 Could you step over an 'invisible box'? Internet goes wild for new viral trend where people appear to walk on air ...

6f5e6_46F3ABA300000578-5141523-image-a-120_1512335456795 Could you step over an 'invisible box'? Internet goes wild for new viral trend where people appear to walk on air ...

Baffling videos have taken the world by storm, people seemingly walking in mid-air by stepping over an invisible box. The premise involves stepping onto an ‘invisible box’ with one foot and leaping over it with the other foot. Some have performed the trick to perfection such as Anderson University football player Dontez Hines (left) and Manvel High School cheerleader Ariel (right)

6f5e6_46F3ABA300000578-5141523-image-a-120_1512335456795 Could you step over an 'invisible box'? Internet goes wild for new viral trend where people appear to walk on air ...

6f5e6_46F3ABA300000578-5141523-image-a-120_1512335456795 Could you step over an 'invisible box'? Internet goes wild for new viral trend where people appear to walk on air ...

Others hilariously fail, tripping over their own feet or even falling to the ground (left and right). However, many Internet users have been left dazed and confused wondering how the trick actually works

The invisible box trick seems to go back a while, with a few posts on Reddit asking how to pull it off. 

In a video posted to YouTube, dancer Marcos Grados, from Guadalajara, Mexico, is seen completing the move during a performance.

In one of the first instances seen of this trick, back in August 2014, the video has been viewed almost 889,000 times.

The basis of the trick is all about jumping with one foot while keeping your ‘stepping’ foot still.

So the performer has to essentially hop forward on one foot while keeping the other fixed in mid-air.

Last month, Men’s Health fitness editor Ebenezer Samuel broke the move down one leg at a time.

6f5e6_46F3ABA300000578-5141523-image-a-120_1512335456795 Could you step over an 'invisible box'? Internet goes wild for new viral trend where people appear to walk on air ...

6f5e6_46F3ABA300000578-5141523-image-a-120_1512335456795 Could you step over an 'invisible box'? Internet goes wild for new viral trend where people appear to walk on air ...

The basis of the trick is all about jumping with one foot while keeping your ‘stepping’ foot still. So the performer has to essentially hop forward on one foot while keeping the other fixed in mid-air

6f5e6_46F3ABA300000578-5141523-image-a-120_1512335456795 Could you step over an 'invisible box'? Internet goes wild for new viral trend where people appear to walk on air ...

6f5e6_46F3ABA300000578-5141523-image-a-120_1512335456795 Could you step over an 'invisible box'? Internet goes wild for new viral trend where people appear to walk on air ...

The invisible box trick seems to go back a while, with a few posts on Reddit asking how to pull it off. In one of the first instances seen of this trick, back in August 2014 by Mexican dancer Marcos Grados (left and right), the video has been viewed almost 889,000 times

The leg that is stepping on the box uses a great deal of hip flexor, glute and core stability. 

‘All [the] hip stabilizers on the right side are firing on overtime to hold that hip in position,’ he said.

‘You’ll notice [the] body rotates toward the leg on the step as well; there’s a ton of oblique and ab stability maintaining that position.’

But the moving leg that hops forward faces a greater challenge. ‘Very explosive hip flexor, abdominal and glute strength is what is driving the leg up and over the box,’ Samuel said.  

This not the first trend to go viral. Other challenges include the planking challenge where participants must lie face down in odd locations, the cinnamon challenge where participants eat a spoonful of ground cinnamon in under 60 seconds without drinking anything or the mannequin challenge where people remained frozen like mannequins while a song plays in the background.


6f5e6_46F3ABA300000578-5141523-image-a-120_1512335456795 Could you step over an 'invisible box'? Internet goes wild for new viral trend where people appear to walk on air ...

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