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Oracle Joins the Serverless Fray with Fn

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Oracle and Google are back in court over Android, again – Business …

  • Oracle on Thursday will try, once again, to get the courts to tell Google to hand over a lot of money.
  • In May 2016, a jury ruled in favor of Google, saying Google’s use of bits of Oracle code in Android constituted “fair use.”
  • Oracle appealed the verdict, however, and the first appeal hearing is scheduled to kick off Thursday.
  • The two have been duking it out in court for years, but so far, Oracle has not been awarded the multi-billion dollar judgment it’s seeking.

Last May, Oracle suffered a well-publicized loss in its years-long lawsuit against Google over Android. Oracle appealed the verdict and the first hearing is scheduled for Thursday.

The trial was watched closely by the computer industry and included testimony from a who’s who in Silicon Valley, including Alphabet CEO Larry Page, Alphabet chairman Eric Schmidt, and Oracle CEO Safra Catz. At once point Oracle’s Larry Ellison even called Page “evil” over the situation.

While each side has won various stages of the legal fight, the upshot is: Google has yet to be told it is on the hook to pay Oracle for Java, much less the massive, multi-billion dollar fine Oracle has been hoping for.

If the appeals court upholds the last jury verdict, which found in favor of Google, that would likely severely hamper Oracle’s attempts to keep going on this case. Google had attempted to get the Supreme Court to jump into the case in 2015 and issue a definitive ruling, but the Supreme Court declined to do so at that time, leaving it to wind its way through the lower courts first.

The trial was so technical that the judge overseeing the trial, Judge William Alsup of the northern district of California, taught himself to code just to understand the case better, The Verge reported at the time.

Oracle and Google have been battling it out for years in two separate court cases over whether Google must pay Oracle billions of dollars for bits of code copied from Java (a programming language Oracle owns) and used in Android (the language Google controls).

At issue were parts of the code called application programming interfaces (APIs), the technology that allows different computer programs to talk to each other. In May 2016, a jury ruled that Google’s use of the disputed code was “fair use.”

These lawsuits caused a lot of hand-wringing in the software industry, with pro-Google sides worrying that if Oracle won the suit, it would be awful for the software industry. Those folks worried that an Oracle win would make APIs the subject of more lawsuits and make APIs more difficult to create and share.

For those in search of more details on Oracle’s potential next moves, a policy blog from the Computer Communications Industry Association called The Project-Disco blog has posted an interesting analysis of the case.

Both Oracle and Google declined comment.

Oracle is trying to get Google to pay it a lot of money for Android, again

  • Oracle on Thursday will try, once again, to get the courts to tell Google to hand over a lot of money.
  • In May 2016, a jury ruled in favor of Google, saying Google’s use of bits of Oracle code in Android constituted “fair use.”
  • Oracle appealed the verdict, however, and the first appeal hearing is scheduled to kick off Thursday.
  • The two have been duking it out in court for years, but so far, Oracle has not been awarded the multi-billion dollar judgment it’s seeking.

Last May, Oracle suffered a well-publicized loss in its years-long lawsuit against Google over Android. Oracle appealed the verdict and the first hearing is scheduled for Thursday.

The trial was watched closely by the computer industry and included testimony from a who’s who in Silicon Valley, including Alphabet CEO Larry Page, Alphabet chairman Eric Schmidt, and Oracle CEO Safra Catz. At once point Oracle’s Larry Ellison even called Page “evil” over the situation.

While each side has won various stages of the legal fight, the upshot is: Google has yet to be told it is on the hook to pay Oracle for Java, much less the massive, multi-billion dollar fine Oracle has been hoping for.

If the appeals court upholds the last jury verdict, which found in favor of Google, that would likely severely hamper Oracle’s attempts to keep going on this case. Google had attempted to get the Supreme Court to jump into the case in 2015 and issue a definitive ruling, but the Supreme Court declined to do so at that time, leaving it to wind its way through the lower courts first.

The trial was so technical that the judge overseeing the trial, Judge William Alsup of the northern district of California, taught himself to code just to understand the case better, The Verge reported at the time.

Oracle and Google have been battling it out for years in two separate court cases over whether Google must pay Oracle billions of dollars for bits of code copied from Java (a programming language Oracle owns) and used in Android (the language Google controls).

At issue were parts of the code called application programming interfaces (APIs), the technology that allows different computer programs to talk to each other. In May 2016, a jury ruled that Google’s use of the disputed code was “fair use.”

These lawsuits caused a lot of hand-wringing in the software industry, with pro-Google sides worrying that if Oracle won the suit, it would be awful for the software industry. Those folks worried that an Oracle win would make APIs the subject of more lawsuits and make APIs more difficult to create and share.

For those in search of more details on Oracle’s potential next moves, a policy blog from the Computer Communications Industry Association called The Project-Disco blog has posted an interesting analysis of the case.

Both Oracle and Google declined comment.

Oracle is trying to get Google to pay it a lot of money for Android, again

  • Oracle on Thursday will try, once again, to get the courts to tell Google to hand over a lot of money.
  • In May 2016, a jury ruled in favor of Google, saying Google’s use of bits of Oracle code in Android constituted “fair use.”
  • Oracle appealed the verdict, however, and the first appeal hearing is scheduled to kick off Thursday.
  • The two have been duking it out in court for years, but so far, Oracle has not been awarded the multi-billion dollar judgment it’s seeking.

Last May, Oracle suffered a well-publicized loss in its years-long lawsuit against Google over Android. Oracle appealed the verdict and the first hearing is scheduled for Thursday.

The trial was watched closely by the computer industry and included testimony from a who’s who in Silicon Valley, including Alphabet CEO Larry Page, Alphabet chairman Eric Schmidt, and Oracle CEO Safra Catz. At once point Oracle’s Larry Ellison even called Page “evil” over the situation.

While each side has won various stages of the legal fight, the upshot is: Google has yet to be told it is on the hook to pay Oracle for Java, much less the massive, multi-billion dollar fine Oracle has been hoping for.

If the appeals court upholds the last jury verdict, which found in favor of Google, that would likely severely hamper Oracle’s attempts to keep going on this case. Google had attempted to get the Supreme Court to jump into the case in 2015 and issue a definitive ruling, but the Supreme Court declined to do so at that time, leaving it to wind its way through the lower courts first.

The trial was so technical that the judge overseeing the trial, Judge William Alsup of the northern district of California, taught himself to code just to understand the case better, The Verge reported at the time.

Oracle and Google have been battling it out for years in two separate court cases over whether Google must pay Oracle billions of dollars for bits of code copied from Java (a programming language Oracle owns) and used in Android (the language Google controls).

At issue were parts of the code called application programming interfaces (APIs), the technology that allows different computer programs to talk to each other. In May 2016, a jury ruled that Google’s use of the disputed code was “fair use.”

These lawsuits caused a lot of hand-wringing in the software industry, with pro-Google sides worrying that if Oracle won the suit, it would be awful for the software industry. Those folks worried that an Oracle win would make APIs the subject of more lawsuits and make APIs more difficult to create and share.

For those in search of more details on Oracle’s potential next moves, a policy blog from the Computer Communications Industry Association called The Project-Disco blog has posted an interesting analysis of the case.

Both Oracle and Google declined comment.

Oracle is trying to get Google to pay it a lot of money for Android, again

  • Oracle on Thursday will try, once again, to get the courts to tell Google to hand over a lot of money.
  • In May 2016, a jury ruled in favor of Google, saying Google’s use of bits of Oracle code in Android constituted “fair use.”
  • Oracle appealed the verdict, however, and the first appeal hearing is scheduled to kick off Thursday.
  • The two have been duking it out in court for years, but so far, Oracle has not been awarded the multi-billion dollar judgment it’s seeking.

Last May, Oracle suffered a well-publicized loss in its years-long lawsuit against Google over Android. Oracle appealed the verdict and the first hearing is scheduled for Thursday.

The trial was watched closely by the computer industry and included testimony from a who’s who in Silicon Valley, including Alphabet CEO Larry Page, Alphabet chairman Eric Schmidt, and Oracle CEO Safra Catz. At once point Oracle’s Larry Ellison even called Page “evil” over the situation.

While each side has won various stages of the legal fight, the upshot is: Google has yet to be told it is on the hook to pay Oracle for Java, much less the massive, multi-billion dollar fine Oracle has been hoping for.

If the appeals court upholds the last jury verdict, which found in favor of Google, that would likely severely hamper Oracle’s attempts to keep going on this case. Google had attempted to get the Supreme Court to jump into the case in 2015 and issue a definitive ruling, but the Supreme Court declined to do so at that time, leaving it to wind its way through the lower courts first.

The trial was so technical that the judge overseeing the trial, Judge William Alsup of the northern district of California, taught himself to code just to understand the case better, The Verge reported at the time.

Oracle and Google have been battling it out for years in two separate court cases over whether Google must pay Oracle billions of dollars for bits of code copied from Java (a programming language Oracle owns) and used in Android (the language Google controls).

At issue were parts of the code called application programming interfaces (APIs), the technology that allows different computer programs to talk to each other. In May 2016, a jury ruled that Google’s use of the disputed code was “fair use.”

These lawsuits caused a lot of hand-wringing in the software industry, with pro-Google sides worrying that if Oracle won the suit, it would be awful for the software industry. Those folks worried that an Oracle win would make APIs the subject of more lawsuits and make APIs more difficult to create and share.

For those in search of more details on Oracle’s potential next moves, a policy blog from the Computer Communications Industry Association called The Project-Disco blog has posted an interesting analysis of the case.

Both Oracle and Google declined comment.

Beyond Bitcoin: Oracle, IBM Prepare Blockchains for Industrial Use

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Oracle ZFS man calls for Big Red to let filesystem upstream into …

Oracle storage architect has called for Oracle to make the ZFS filesystem a first class part of Linux and says conversations have taken place within Big Red to consider the possibility.

Speaking at the OpenZFS Developer Summit , Maybee said the decline of on-premises storage means ZFS’ future inside Oracle is uncertain. Oracle’s recent decision to spend less time on Solaris development also means ZFS needs less work, he said.

While the filesystem underpins Oracle’s software-as-a-service and platform-as-a-service, it’s invisible to users.

Maybee thinks ZFS is good enough that it deserves to be widely available, hence his wish that “What I would like to see happen inside Oracle is for ZFS becomes a core part of Linux, not an add-on part of Linux.”

23094_mark_maybee_zfs_slide Oracle ZFS man calls for Big Red to let filesystem upstream into ...

Mark Maybee’s wishlist for ZFS on Linux

“I would like us to look at Linux as a core supported platform, so every feature and bug we develop targeted so that Linux is always up to date.”

“Ideally it would be the default filesystem in Linux, that would be a huge win for us.”

To make that happen, Maybee said “I would like to see Oracle port its version of ZFS into Oracle’s version of linux, and push that upstream.”

“Will that happen?” he asked, answering “That’s hard to say. Oracle is very protective of its IP. But we have had conversations about it, there is a possibility there.”

If the possibility became a reality, it has the potential to end the long-running dispute over whether it’s possible to include ZFS with Linux distributions. Ubuntu added ZFS in version 16.04, leading the Software Freedom Conservancy and Richard Stallman to argue, forcefully that licence incompatibilities mean it can’t be done.

The root of the dispute is that Oracle applies the Common Development and Distribution License, version 1 (CDDLv1) to ZFS, and it doesn’t have the same terms as Linux’s GPLv2. Linux folk generally admire ZFS for its many fine qualities and many would like to use it.

Dogfood disaster

Maybee also detailed Oracle’s efforts to implement ZFS appliances across its business after acquiring Sun Microsystems in 2012.

Sun had just released a ZFS-powered storage appliance and Oracle founder Larry Ellison decreed they would become the standard at Big Red, necessitating the replacement of 12 petabytes of kit supplied by NetApp.

Maybee showed a slide from those days on which NetApp proudly proclaimed Oracle was its largest user, anywhere, ever.

The project didn’t go well.

“This was really a trial by fire,” Maybee said. “We were going in there and trying to force ZFS into a new model of storage into an operations organisation that was intimately familiar with NetApp.”

Complicating matters further, the ZFS appliance “had never been rolled out at this scale before and it was growing and evolving. “It was becoming a solid product but it took some time.”

Oracle therefore found itself employing several “tiger teams” to address storage-related problems and storage became the scapegoat for many problems.

“Overall these were pretty ugly days,” Maybee said. So ugly that the vice president in charge of the migration “requested a meeting with Larry. She walked in with a deck that was going to explain why ZFS was failing in her environment and why we had to go back to NetApp.”

“Famously, Larry looked at her and said there is no plan B, you will go with ZFS.”

And so Oracle did.

23094_mark_maybee_zfs_slide Oracle ZFS man calls for Big Red to let filesystem upstream into ...

Eating your own dogfood isn’t always easy

While Maybee saw that as a win for ZFS, the long migration also saw his team asked to work on stability rather than innovation.

Maybee’s speech is available here, and also here in Dropbox in case anyone deems it too controversial to survive, as sometimes happens when vendors are embarrassed by a talk they didn’t think would be reported. ®

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The Joy and Pain of Buying IT – Have Your Say

Oracle ZFS man calls for Big Red to let filesystem upstream into Linux

Oracle storage architect has called for Oracle to make the ZFS filesystem a first class part of Linux and says conversations have taken place within Big Red to consider the possibility.

Speaking at the OpenZFS Developer Summit , Maybee said the decline of on-premises storage means ZFS’ future inside Oracle is uncertain. Oracle’s recent decision to spend less time on Solaris development also means ZFS needs less work, he said.

While the filesystem underpins Oracle’s software-as-a-service and platform-as-a-service, it’s invisible to users.

Maybee thinks ZFS is good enough that it deserves to be widely available, hence his wish that “What I would like to see happen inside Oracle is for ZFS becomes a core part of Linux, not an add-on part of Linux.”

d8651_mark_maybee_zfs_slide Oracle ZFS man calls for Big Red to let filesystem upstream into Linux

Mark Maybee’s wishlist for ZFS on Linux

“I would like us to look at Linux as a core supported platform, so every feature and bug we develop targeted so that Linux is always up to date.”

“Ideally it would be the default filesystem in Linux, that would be a huge win for us.”

To make that happen, Maybee said “I would like to see Oracle port its version of ZFS into Oracle’s version of linux, and push that upstream.”

“Will that happen?” he asked, answering “That’s hard to say. Oracle is very protective of its IP. But we have had conversations about it, there is a possibility there.”

If the possibility became a reality, it has the potential to end the long-running dispute over whether it’s possible to include ZFS with Linux distributions. Ubuntu added ZFS in version 16.04, leading the Software Freedom Conservancy and Richard Stallman to argue, forcefully that licence incompatibilities mean it can’t be done.

The root of the dispute is that Oracle applies the Common Development and Distribution License, version 1 (CDDLv1) to ZFS, and it doesn’t have the same terms as Linux’s GPLv2. Linux folk generally admire ZFS for its many fine qualities and many would like to use it.

Dogfood disaster

Maybee also detailed Oracle’s efforts to implement ZFS appliances across its business after acquiring Sun Microsystems in 2012.

Sun had just released a ZFS-powered storage appliance and Oracle founder Larry Ellison decreed they would become the standard at Big Red, necessitating the replacement of 12 petabytes of kit supplied by NetApp.

Maybee showed a slide from those days on which NetApp proudly proclaimed Oracle was its largest user, anywhere, ever.

The project didn’t go well.

“This was really a trial by fire,” Maybee said. “We were going in there and trying to force ZFS into a new model of storage into an operations organisation that was intimately familiar with NetApp.”

Complicating matters further, the ZFS appliance “had never been rolled out at this scale before and it was growing and evolving. “It was becoming a solid product but it took some time.”

Oracle therefore found itself employing several “tiger teams” to address storage-related problems and storage became the scapegoat for many problems.

“Overall these were pretty ugly days,” Maybee said. So ugly that the vice president in charge of the migration “requested a meeting with Larry. She walked in with a deck that was going to explain why ZFS was failing in her environment and why we had to go back to NetApp.”

“Famously, Larry looked at her and said there is no plan B, you will go with ZFS.”

And so Oracle did.

d8651_mark_maybee_zfs_slide Oracle ZFS man calls for Big Red to let filesystem upstream into Linux

Eating your own dogfood isn’t always easy

While Maybee saw that as a win for ZFS, the long migration also saw his team asked to work on stability rather than innovation.

Maybee’s speech is available here, and also here in Dropbox in case anyone deems it too controversial to survive, as sometimes happens when vendors are embarrassed by a talk they didn’t think would be reported. ®

Sponsored:
The Joy and Pain of Buying IT – Have Your Say

SteelCloud Expands Linux STIG Support to Ubuntu, SUSE, and Oracle Linux

ASHBURN, Va., Oct. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — SteelCloud LLC announced today that it has enhanced ConfigOS, its patented STIG remediation software, to support the newly released Ubuntu, SUSE, and Oracle Linux STIGs.  These new supported platforms bolster the product’s existing Red Hat Linux automated STIG remediation capabilities.  The expanded ConfigOS Linux security content will be provided to new and existing customers at no additional charge.

“ConfigOS now has automated STIG support for every version of Linux that has a published DISA STIG,” said Brian Hajost, SteelCloud President and CEO.  “Our customers depend on us to keep them current by supporting the newest STIGs.  It is all about choice and we want to make sure that we give our customers the ability to efficiently deploy and support the compliant platforms most appropriate for their missions.  ConfigOS is very compelling in that a single instance of the software automates STIG remediation across all versions of Linux and Windows in a single pass.”

ConfigOS is currently implemented in classified and unclassified environments, tactical programs, disconnected labs, and the AWS commercial cloud.  ConfigOS is client-less technology, requiring no software agents.  ConfigOS scans endpoint systems and remediates hundreds of STIG controls in under in under 90 seconds.  Automated remediation rollback as well as comprehensive compliance reporting and STIG Viewer XCCDF output are provided.  ConfigOS was designed to harden every CAT 1/2/3 STIG control around an application baseline in 60 minutes – typically eliminating weeks or months from the RMF accreditation timeline.  ConfigOS automates the incorporation of documented policy waivers to ensure flawless automated STIG remediation and compliance reporting.

In addition to commercial versions of Linux, ConfigOS also addresses CentOS and Microsoft workstation and server operating systems together with Windows applications such as SQL, IIS, IE, Chrome, and all of the Microsoft Office components including Office 2016.  ConfigOS remediates all user profiles in a single pass, providing significant benefits when transitioning to Windows 10.

To receive more information on ConfigOS, please contact SteelCloud at rel=”nofollow”info@steelcloud.com.  Video demonstrations of ConfigOS Windows and Linux STIG remediation are available on the Company’s website, www.steelcloud.com, under the “Demos” tab.

About SteelCloud
SteelCloud develops STIG and CIS compliance software for government customers and those technology providers that support the government.  Our products automate policy and security remediation by reducing the complexity, effort, and expense of meeting government security mandates.  SteelCloud has delivered security policy-compliant solutions to military components around the world which simplify implementation and ongoing security and mission support.  SteelCloud products are easy to license through our GSA Schedule 70 contract.   SteelCloud can be reached at (703) 674-5500.  Additional information is available at www.steelcloud.com or by email at rel=”nofollow”info@steelcloud.com.

View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/steelcloud-expands-linux-stig-support-to-ubuntu-suse-and-oracle-linux-300539038.html

SOURCE SteelCloud LLC

SteelCloud Expands Linux STIG Support to Ubuntu, SUSE, and Oracle Linux

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