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MIUI 9 Global Developer ROM v7.12.8 Brings Notifications in Line with Stock Android

Notifications in MIUI have always been a pain point. Even though other Android devices have had a single finger swipe gesture to expand notifications back in Android Jelly Bean, users would have to swipe with two fingers to expand notifications in MIUI. The problems don’t stop there, though. Android Nougat brought inline replies to notifications and also introduced bundled notifications from the same app in order to cut down on clutter. Unfortunately, Xiaomi didn’t bother to add these features to Nougat-based MIUI ROMs in its phones. Other problems with notifications in MIUI included not being able to dismiss or expand notifications on the lock screen, though the former was eventually added to the software. Xiaomi finally announced that MIUI 9 would handle notifications better by bringing its behavior more in line with stock Android.

d1977_MIUI-9-Notifications MIUI 9 Global Developer ROM v7.12.8 Brings Notifications in Line with Stock Android

That means adding a one-finger gesture to expand notifications, in-line quick replies, and bundled notifications. However, even though Xiaomi has started rolling-out the MIUI 9 Global Stable update to many phones, the improved way of handling notifications hadn’t been added yet. In response to users’ queries, Xiaomi clarified that the capabilities would make their way to MIUI 9 in the near future. Now, Reddit user bloodvayne has found that MIUI Global Developer ROM v7.12.8 finally brings the aforementioned notifications update.

The Reddit user confirmed that Android 7.0 Nougat-based devices running the latest Developer ROM of MIUI 9 (v7.12.8) now has the one finger swipe gesture to expand notifications, as well as the addition of quick replies. Xiaomi has also added bundled notifications, and bloodvayne was able to confirm that they worked on apps such as WhatsApp and Telegram.

The Global Developer ROM is expected to roll-out to supported devices in the coming days and weeks. The Global Stable ROM lags behind when it comes to adding new features, but we expect Xiaomi to bring the capabilities to MIUI 9 Global Stable ROM soon. When the Global Stable ROM eventually starts rolling-out, one of the major pain points with MIUI will be solved, which will result in a better user experience for MIUI users.


Source: /u/bloodvayne

AutoNotification Lets You Mark Gmail Messages as Read From Your Android Notifications

d3d4a_if6c3hn8y4qrb0f3n1eg AutoNotification Lets You Mark Gmail Messages as Read From Your Android Notifications
Image: Pexels

Most of us end up getting a ton of email during the day. As it turns out, I see a lot of that email via the notification bar on my phone. I want to know what emails have come in, but not enough to go into the Gmail app on the phone, and so browsing them in Notifications is a quick and easy solution. When I see something in there I want to read or respond to, I launch the app.

When you look at emails via the notifications tab the Gmail app doesn’t acknowledge that you’ve seen the message exists. That means that when I do launch the Gmail app to see that one note I need to respond to I get bombarded with the 50 emails I’ve already dismissed for the day and probably would have archived if I’d launched the app to begin with.

Now there’s a solution for that… sort of.

AutoNotification is an app that intercepts the traditional notification and allows you to mark your Gmail messages as read right from the notification bar without archiving them. That means you’ll still see them in your inbox the you eventually do launch it, but they’ll be “read” so your unread messages will stand out, Android Police reports.

It’s not as good as being able to just toss those spammy messages in the trash right from your notification bar, but it’s still a pretty useful proposition.

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There’s a good chance you’ve heard of AutoNotification before. We wrote about some of the service’s features last year.

While service has been around for a bit, the Gmail functionality is a recent (and let’s face it, much needed) addition.

AutoNotification Lets You Mark Gmail Messages as Read From Your Android Notifications

d3d4a_if6c3hn8y4qrb0f3n1eg AutoNotification Lets You Mark Gmail Messages as Read From Your Android Notifications
Image: Pexels

Most of us end up getting a ton of email during the day. As it turns out, I see a lot of that email via the notification bar on my phone. I want to know what emails have come in, but not enough to go into the Gmail app on the phone, and so browsing them in Notifications is a quick and easy solution. When I see something in there I want to read or respond to, I launch the app.

When you look at emails via the notifications tab the Gmail app doesn’t acknowledge that you’ve seen the message exists. That means that when I do launch the Gmail app to see that one note I need to respond to I get bombarded with the 50 emails I’ve already dismissed for the day and probably would have archived if I’d launched the app to begin with.

Now there’s a solution for that… sort of.

AutoNotification is an app that intercepts the traditional notification and allows you to mark your Gmail messages as read right from the notification bar without archiving them. That means you’ll still see them in your inbox the you eventually do launch it, but they’ll be “read” so your unread messages will stand out, Android Police reports.

It’s not as good as being able to just toss those spammy messages in the trash right from your notification bar, but it’s still a pretty useful proposition.

Advertisement

There’s a good chance you’ve heard of AutoNotification before. We wrote about some of the service’s features last year.

While service has been around for a bit, the Gmail functionality is a recent (and let’s face it, much needed) addition.

Kill annoying alerts! Here’s how to turn off notifications on an iPhone

One of the most important reasons you have your iPhone with you at all times is so you can stay up-to-date with the things and people that are most important to you. This need to be connected is an important consideration when it comes to choosing our data plans, carriers, smartphones, and many other things.

But one of the downsides of being connected 24/7 is that you may be overwhelmed with the number of notifications coming in. They can be helpful, but sometimes notifications can get in the way of whatever you’re doing, or they can disturb you when you don’t want them to.

Managing notifications is an essential part of dealing with your iPhone on a daily basis and also a way to keep that long list of notifications in your Notification Center somewhat manageable. Here’s an easy walk-through on how to turn off notifications on an iPhone.

If you haven’t updated to Apple’s latest yet, here’s our iOS 11 review, all of its new features, and also its most common problems and how to fix them.

Turn off all notifications

If you want to turn off all notifications at once, the easiest way to do it is to turn on Do Not Disturb. To do this, swipe up from the bottom and tap the moon icon next to the screen rotation lock.

Do Not Disturb allows notifications to arrive, but it prevents them from making sounds or waking up the display.

You can go to Settings Do Not Disturb and access all the settings for Do Not Disturb. For instance, you could schedule it to turn on and off at specific times.

Maybe you turn on Do Not Disturb manually late at night because you don’t want to disturb someone else, and a text notification makes a sound anyway. In the settings, you have an option to silence always or only while iPhone is locked. You can also allow calls from your favorites and even have it turn on by itself while you’re driving.

We suggest going into the Do Not Disturb settings to set it up the way that works best for you.

Turn off notifications for specific apps

If you’re looking to turn off notifications for an app, go to Settings Notifications. You will see a list of all your apps here, and you can turn off the notifications, or make the notifications behave in a way that you find less annoying, in case you want to see the notification but the way it’s currently coming in is getting on your nerves somehow.

This screen may seem self-explanatory at first, but let’s dig into it a little deeper. Firstly, at the very top, you will see an option that says Show Previews. The Show Previews option is there for each app, but iOS 11 introduced this toggle where you can manage it for all apps at once. Show Previews is important for your privacy.

Below is an example of the way a notification will show up with Show Previews enabled.

And here is an example of the way a notification will show up with Show Previews disabled. You can set Show Previews to show always, when unlocked, or never.

Sometimes hiding the preview is the best way to go for your privacy. You can also do this on an individual app, so let’s take a look at the options you will find within the notification settings for each app.

  • Allow Notifications: Toggle this to turn the notifications on or off.
  • Sounds: Toggle this on or off if you want notification sounds for this app.
  • Badge App Icon: This option controls whether or not you want to display the small red circle on the top-right corner of the icon showing the notification counter.
  • (Alerts) Show on Lock Screen: This will let you control whether or not you want to show the notifications on the lock screen for this app.
  • (Alerts) Show in History: Controls whether or not you want to see the notifications for this app when you swipe down from the top to reveal notification center.
  • (Alerts) Show as Banners: Do you like notification banners? Use this to turn them off if you don’t. You can also set them to show temporarily or persist on the screen until you tap on them.

If you scroll down a little more, you will see Show Previews at the bottom. You can set it here for that particular app if you want the previews to show always, when unlocked, or never.




How to make your phone’s Gmail notifications much, much better

In my never-ending quest to minimize distractions and maximize efficiency in my work — a quest that’s especially challenging this time of year! — one thing I’ve discovered is that notifications tend to be detrimental to productivity.

Think about it: By their very nature, notifications are distractions. They flash and ding and steal your focus away from whatever Very Important Task you happen to be doing at any given moment (even if said task is simply staring blankly whilst thinking of cake — hey, we’ve all been there). And more often than not, your allegedly smart phone’s notifications don’t involve anything that actually demands your immediate attention. Pardon my gibberish, but that’s pretty flarking stupid.

And you know what else? All that focus-shifting takes a serious toll on your productivity. You can find plenty of science to back that up, but if you’re anything like me, you’ve probably felt the momentum-stealing effect of a digital interruption for yourself more times than you can count on your ticklish little tootsies.

Some notifications are easy to eliminate with the flip of a switch (and I’d strongly suggest doing so for any alerts you can live without) — but with email, well, things tend to get a touch more complicated. Most of us receive at least some messages that truly do demand our immediate attention, even if they’re a tiny fraction of the total. So shutting off email notifications entirely often isn’t a viable option.

Google Play Store shows a new Notifications section for some users

It appears that the Play Store team is testing another new feature in the Android app, though you may like this one more than the new tab bar that’s been rolling out to more and more devices. In the side menu of the Play Store, some users are seeing a new Notifications section, right below My Apps games.

Tapping on it opens a dedicated Notifications screen, where both of our tipsters have only seen the below “You’re all caught up” graphic. It appears that the screen will be used to show you “notifications about your favorite apps and games,” though what that exactly means, I’m not sure. The Settings cog takes you to the pre-existing Notifications settings in the Play Store where you can enable notifications on app/game updates and auto-updates, as well as pre-registration and deals/promos.

ccf71_nexus2cee_play-store-notifications-1-329x585 Google Play Store shows a new Notifications section for some users ccf71_nexus2cee_play-store-notifications-1-329x585 Google Play Store shows a new Notifications section for some users

If that’s the same thing you’ll see in the Notifications screen then I find it quite repetitive and not very useful, unless there were more details on the changelogs or a history of notifications so you could see dismissed notifications for deals or pre-registration titles. But that doesn’t appear to be the case.

Either way, this new section is only starting to show up for a few users, so we’ll keep an eye on it and see how it gets populated and whether more interesting info is surfaced through it. Let us know if you’re seeing it too, and if so, whether you’ve spotted some notifications inside it.

Quick Tip: How to Turn Off Cortana Notifications in Windows 10

  • 204ca_windows-10-remote-laptop-260x160 Quick Tip: How to Turn Off Cortana Notifications in Windows 10

    Quick Tip: Turn On Remote Desktop in Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

    Filed Under: Windows

  • Check your phone less by sending those notifications to your computer

    iPhones and macOS computers

    As you would expect from two Apple operating systems, macOS works seamlessly with iOS. So if you have an iPhone, then you’ll be able to access some of the phone-laptop links you need right out of the box. Thanks to a feature called Continuity, calls, texts, and iMessages can sync easily between iDevices. One downside: macOS’s native features only apply to call and text alerts, not other app notifications. Another downside: Android users can’t use these native features at all. However, if you own an Android phone and an Apple computer, you can still forward alerts—you’ll just need to skip to the next section.

    For those who do own both an iPhone and a computer running macOS, follow the instructions in this section. To get calls to show up on your Mac, make sure you’re signed into the same iCloud and FaceTime accounts on both devices and you’ve turned on the Wi-Fi for both devices as well. On your iPhone, go to Settings, then Phone, then Calls on Other Devices, and enable Continuity. Next, turn to your computer. Open up FaceTime on macOS, select Preferences from the FaceTime menu, and selecte the Calls from iPhone option. When your phone is nearby, plugged into the same Wi-Fi network, you will be able to see incoming calls and even answer them from your computer.

    To get SMS, MMS, and iMessage alerts on your Mac, again sign into iCloud with the same Apple ID on both your phone and your Mac. Next, open Settings on your iPhone, choose Messages, and hit Send and Receive. Make sure you’re using the right Apple ID, then tick both your phone number and email address. Head to Text Message Forwarding in the Messages menu and choose your Mac from the list. Finally, put down the iPhone and turn to your computer. On macOS, open up the Messages app, then choose Preferences from the Messages menu. Click Accounts, select your iMessage account, double-check the right Apple ID is in use, and then put a tick next to both your email address and your phone number. As with calls, you will be able to see alerts and respond to texts as well.

    Restore Notifications You Accidentally Dismissed With This Android App

    fdde2_zqyrswcsmdw1yvuzjk5w Restore Notifications You Accidentally Dismissed With This Android App

    Android: How often do you glance at your phone’s lock screen, skim through a list of notifications, and dismiss them all without a second thought? If you’re like me, that’s pretty much every morning. And if you’re like me, you often regret doing it when you can’t find an important notification a few seconds later.

    Read the rest of this page »

    Restore Notifications You Accidentally Dismissed with This Android App

    678c8_zqyrswcsmdw1yvuzjk5w Restore Notifications You Accidentally Dismissed with This Android App

    Android: How often do you glance at your phone’s lock screen, skim through a list of notifications and dismiss them all without a second thought? If you’re like me, that’s pretty much every morning. And if you’re like me, you often regret doing it when you can’t find an important notification a few seconds later.

    It’s a first world problem in need of a solution, and now it has one (on Android, anyway). Notification History Log is a new Android app that saves all your notifications locally on your device in one simple place.

    How to Use Notification History Log

    Once you’ve downloaded the app from the Google Play Store, open it and wait a few seconds as it configures to your phone. Notification History Log should work with any device running Android 4.4 KitKat or higher, which pretty much covers any phone you could currently be using.

    When it’s ready, you’ll see the app’s home screen, which shows the device you’re using and which features it supports. The first is Notification History, Android’s very limited built-in notification log. Ignore that and click on Advanced History instead.

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    From the Advanced History tab you can look through all your recent notifications. There’s also a search feature for scanning through individual apps or looking for a message from a specific person. You can also specify how many notifications it should store at a time (from 15 up to 250), clear your notification history and set Advanced History as the app’s default landing page.

    The app is free, but there’s also a Pro Version for $1.49 with some useful additional features, including the option to store unlimited notifications. It also adds the ability to swipe on a single notification to delete it or blacklist apps from showing up at all. Even better, it removes the ads from Notification History Log, which might be worth it if you’re constantly diving into the app to retrieve a notification you accidentally dismissed.

    Android Pay Tests Notifications for All Credit Card Purchases

    Android Pay, Google’s contactless payment method, allows for ease of purchase of many goods and services in many countries across the world and in partnership with thousands of banks. Google offers a similar service in the form of Tez in India, and there are other contactless payment providers in various different countries. Now Google is looking to enhance their Android Pay service once more by testing notifications for all credit card purchases.

    If you’ve ever bought anything with PayPal while the PayPal app is installed on your device, you’ll know that when you purchase an item through your PayPal account that you will receive a notification saying that you paid a certain amount to whatever company it was. It’s a security feature and also a pretty neat way to tell how much you paid when you purchase things in other currencies, as it will also convert it to your local currency. This is by and large a security feature, however, and Google will now be implementing it too, along with a little extra.

    2bf11_screen1-169x300 Android Pay Tests Notifications for All Credit Card Purchases


    Images credit: @shiruken

    As can be seen in the screenshots above, not only are there some notification configurations for your purchases, but Android Pay actually shows you non-Android Pay transactions depending on the bank that you’re with. This allows you to keep track of your transactions easily, and manage purchases too within the same app as you presumably may use the service when out and about. As you can see, there are quite a lot of options including loyalty and gift card notifications too, and a notification telling you that you’re actually near an Android Pay supporting store! All of this should help you stay aware of how much you’re spending, and keep track of how that money is being spent. It can also help you spot suspicious activity should someone get access to your credit card details. This feature does not seem to be out for everyone yet, but hopefully it’ll make its way to your device soon!


    Source: @shiruken

    Chrome Will Soon Have Native Notifications On Linux

    f169f_chromelinuxnotification-1024x683 Chrome Will Soon Have Native Notifications On Linux
    Notifications, whether on desktop or mobile, may seem like the minutiae of an application but that’s because most of us are accustomed to our platform choice have a uniform look and feel that seemlessly pulls everything together.

    Developers, for the most part, have to tools to build their products to fit within a given ecosystem and appear right at home as if designed specifically for the given OS or application. If you’re a Mac user, you have MacOS-esque notifications. Windows users can spot a Microsoft notification from across the room.

    Chromebooks had inherently adopted Google’s Material Design style which is rapidly becoming more and more like that of Android as the line between the two systems blurs.

    One operating system, however, tends to be left out in the cold when it comes to the slick, polished look that comes with these native features.

    Linux may not be a household name for many of you but chances are you are using it as we speak. Android and Chrome OS both take advantage of the Linux kernel and a vast majority of cloud services, super-computers and giant corporate infrastructures are just a few examples of Linux at work.

    I’ll spare you the 25-year history of what Linux is all about but if you’d like to read more about what it is and what it can do check out the link below.

    What is Linux?

    Being that Linux is strongly steeped in the development community, things like UI, native notifications and such are often cast aside to focus on more consumer-based platforms like Windows or Mac. John Q. Public wants a friendly user experience and, since that’s where the money’s at, that’s who gets priority.

    In early May of this year, the Chromium project launched a native notification system for MacOS that allows Macs to serve up notifications in the traditional “Appley” manner. Native notification. Smoother work-flow. Happy consumer.

    f169f_chromelinuxnotification-1024x683 Chrome Will Soon Have Native Notifications On Linux
    Linux, sadly, received no love from the Chromium project despite a feature request for native notifications almost a year ago. The good news is that despite the low priority of the request (priority 3 with 3 being the lowest and 0 being the highest), a recent commit in the Chromium repository appears to be finally adding the feature.

    Enable native notifications on desktop Linux

    In the commit we see that this is just a “dry run” for testing but it is plain to see the native notification feature should soon find its way to the Stable release of Chrome for Linux and that’s great news for our friend Tux the Linux penguin.

    With any luck, we will hear some news from the Chromium blog on when to expect this update and what developers need to do in order to migrate to the new featrue. Stay tuned for more.

    Linux Will Soon Have Native Notifications On Chrome

    33f73_chromelinuxnotification-1024x683 Linux Will Soon Have Native Notifications On Chrome
    Notifications, whether on desktop or mobile, may seem like the minutiae of an application but that’s because most of us are accustomed to our platform choice have a uniform look and feel that seemlessly pulls everything together.

    Developers, for the most part, have to tools to build their products to fit within a given ecosystem and appear right at home as if designed specifically for the given OS or application. If you’re a Mac user, you have MacOS-esque notifications. Windows users can spot a Microsoft notification from across the room.

    Chromebooks had inherently adopted Google’s Material Design style which is rapidly becoming more and more like that of Android as the line between the two systems blurs.

    One operating system, however, tends to be left out in the cold when it comes to the slick, polished look that comes with these native features.

    Linux may not be a household name for many of you but chances are you are using it as we speak. Android and Chrome OS both take advantage of the Linux kernel and a vast majority of cloud services, super-computers and giant corporate infrastructures are just a few examples of Linux at work.

    I’ll spare you the 25-year history of what Linux is all about but if you’d like to read more about what it is and what it can do check out the link below.

    What is Linux?

    Being that Linux is strongly steeped in the development community, things like UI, native notifications and such are often cast aside to focus on more consumer-based platforms like Windows or Mac. John Q. Public wants a friendly user experience and, since that’s where the money’s at, that’s who gets priority.

    In early May of this year, the Chromium project launched a native notification system for MacOS that allows Macs to serve up notifications in the traditional “Appley” manner. Native notification. Smoother work-flow. Happy consumer.

    33f73_chromelinuxnotification-1024x683 Linux Will Soon Have Native Notifications On Chrome
    Linux, sadly, received no love from the Chromium project despite a feature request for native notifications almost a year ago. The good news is that despite the low priority of the request (priority 3 with 3 being the lowest and 0 being the highest), a recent commit in the Chromium repository appears to be finally adding the feature.

    Enable native notifications on desktop Linux

    In the commit we see that this is just a “dry run” for testing but it is plain to see the native notification feature should soon find its way to the Stable release of Chrome for Linux and that’s great news for our friend Tux the Linux penguin.

    With any luck, we will hear some news from the Chromium blog on when to expect this update and what developers need to do in order to migrate to the new featrue. Stay tuned for more.

    How to customize Android Oreo notifications with categories

    71ea7_20170829alisondan How to customize Android Oreo notifications with categories

    Android Oreo offers a number of nifty little features that, together, go a long way to make this latest iteration of the platform one of the most polished and user-friendly. One such feature expands the flexibility of notifications. The addition in question is Notification Categories, a feature that allows you to decide which aspects of an app can send information to the notification shade.

    How this new addition works is simple. Say you have multiple email accounts associated with the Gmail app. What if only one of those accounts need to have a high notification priority and the rest do not? Or what if you want to configure any incoming email with an attachment to have low priority? With the new Categories option, you can now set that up.

    Each app will offer different categories and some offer none. For example, Inbox doesn’t offer categories, whereas the Twitter app offers categories for direct messages, emergency alerts, related to you and your tweets, followers and contacts, recommendations from Twitter, security, and tweets from people you follow. In other words, you’ll need to test this out on various notifications you receive.

    Remember, this feature only works in Android 8 (Oreo).

    SEE: Interview questions: Android developer (Tech Pro Research)

    How it works

    Pull down your notification shade and long press one of the entries. When you do this, the ALL CATEGORIES entry will appear (Figure A).

    Figure A

    71ea7_20170829alisondan How to customize Android Oreo notifications with categories

    Getting ready to configure Twitter Notification Categories.

    Tap the ALL CATEGORIES button and the Category configuration window will appear for that particular app. From that window (Figure B), you can enable/disable the various notification categories.

    Figure B

    71ea7_20170829alisondan How to customize Android Oreo notifications with categories

    The Notification Categories for the Twitter app.

    Say, for example, you want to receive notifications of direct messages, but not anything else for the Twitter app. You can disable these categories, so to block out all other notifications for the app, by tapping the On/Off slider until everything is disabled, but direct messages.

    SEE: Time management tips for tech professionals (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

    Once you’ve taken care of the configuration, tap the back arrow to dismiss the window. The notification categories have been applied and take effect immediately. Your notifications are now better suited to your needs.

    Notification categories might not be a deal maker or breaker, but they certainly do go a very long way to make the Android experience more efficient and streamline. Go through all of your notifications to find out which apps offer categories, to see how granular you can get. As I mentioned, each app’s notification categories will vary (and some don’t offer the feature), so you may find some apps better support the feature than others. But for the apps that offer categories (and do them well), this option will be a must-use for many.

    Also see

    71ea7_20170829alisondan How to customize Android Oreo notifications with categories

    How to stop iPhone notifications – CNBC.com

    <!– –>


    Tech Guide

    718c9_104771402-annoying-notifications.1910x1000 How to stop iPhone notifications - CNBC.com

    You wake up and you have a notification from a workout app asking you to log your breakfast.

    Then another one lets you know a Fantasy Football player — who isn’t even on your team — is out this week.

    And yet another from some app you never use alerting you of something you don’t care about.

    iPhones are constantly hitting us with notifications that we don’t need. Thankfully, it’s pretty easy to manage what apps notify you and which apps can’t. Here’s how.

    718c9_104771402-annoying-notifications.1910x1000 How to stop iPhone notifications - CNBC.com

    The “Settings” app is where you can can control all sorts of iPhone functions, but we’re going to be diving into just one particular area today.

    Tap “Notifications.” This is where you can manage what apps send you notifications from every single app installed on your iPhone.

    718c9_104771402-annoying-notifications.1910x1000 How to stop iPhone notifications - CNBC.com

    In this case, the app “LetGo” has been really annoying me to sell things. I’m about to stop that from ever happening again. Just scroll down to the app you’re looking for.

    718c9_104771402-annoying-notifications.1910x1000 How to stop iPhone notifications - CNBC.com

    Boom. That’s all there is to it. Now you’ll never receive an alert from that specific app. Keep in mind you’ll want to change this if you decide to start using the app more frequently and actually need notifications from it. This should help quiet things down, though.



    How to stop iPhone notifications – CNBC.com

    <!– –>


    Tech Guide

    718c9_104771402-annoying-notifications.1910x1000 How to stop iPhone notifications - CNBC.com

    You wake up and you have a notification from a workout app asking you to log your breakfast.

    Then another one lets you know a Fantasy Football player — who isn’t even on your team — is out this week.

    And yet another from some app you never use alerting you of something you don’t care about.

    iPhones are constantly hitting us with notifications that we don’t need. Thankfully, it’s pretty easy to manage what apps notify you and which apps can’t. Here’s how.

    718c9_104771402-annoying-notifications.1910x1000 How to stop iPhone notifications - CNBC.com

    The “Settings” app is where you can can control all sorts of iPhone functions, but we’re going to be diving into just one particular area today.

    Tap “Notifications.” This is where you can manage what apps send you notifications from every single app installed on your iPhone.

    718c9_104771402-annoying-notifications.1910x1000 How to stop iPhone notifications - CNBC.com

    In this case, the app “LetGo” has been really annoying me to sell things. I’m about to stop that from ever happening again. Just scroll down to the app you’re looking for.

    718c9_104771402-annoying-notifications.1910x1000 How to stop iPhone notifications - CNBC.com

    Boom. That’s all there is to it. Now you’ll never receive an alert from that specific app. Keep in mind you’ll want to change this if you decide to start using the app more frequently and actually need notifications from it. This should help quiet things down, though.



    How to stop your iPhone from driving you bonkers with notifications

    <!– –>


    Tech Guide

    fe3e6_104771402-annoying-notifications.1910x1000 How to stop your iPhone from driving you bonkers with notifications

    You wake up and you have a notification from a workout app asking you to log your breakfast.

    Then another one lets you know a Fantasy Football player — who isn’t even on your team — is out this week.

    And yet another from some app you never use alerting you of something you don’t care about.

    iPhones are constantly hitting us with notifications that we don’t need. Thankfully, it’s pretty easy to manage what apps notify you and which apps can’t. Here’s how.

    fe3e6_104771402-annoying-notifications.1910x1000 How to stop your iPhone from driving you bonkers with notifications

    The “Settings” app is where you can can control all sorts of iPhone functions, but we’re going to be diving into just one particular area today.

    Tap “Notifications.” This is where you can manage what apps send you notifications from every single app installed on your iPhone.

    fe3e6_104771402-annoying-notifications.1910x1000 How to stop your iPhone from driving you bonkers with notifications

    In this case, the app “LetGo” has been really annoying me to sell things. I’m about to stop that from ever happening again. Just scroll down to the app you’re looking for.

    fe3e6_104771402-annoying-notifications.1910x1000 How to stop your iPhone from driving you bonkers with notifications

    Boom. That’s all there is to it. Now you’ll never receive an alert from that specific app. Keep in mind you’ll want to change this if you decide to start using the app more frequently and actually need notifications from it. This should help quiet things down, though.



    Google Cast Notifications are Broken for Apps Targeting Android Oreo, Google Promises a Fix

    Google Cast is the service that Android uses to stream to a Chromecast. It allows you to put what’s on your phone on a bigger and better screen so that everyone can see. When streaming to a Chromecast, a notification will pop up allowing you to control many aspects of media playback, such as track skipping.  You can also stop, pause or mute from the notification. On Android Oreo, however, any apps targetting SDK26 (Android Oreo), will have some broken functionality when it comes to using Google Cast.

    On Android Oreo, if the application you are using targets SDK26, then you will not receive the notification giving you options to control the device. There is a relatively simple explanation as to why it happens, and it’s due to the Android Oreo changes to notifications. Android Oreo introduced notification channels, a requirement for applications to include when building for Android Oreo. The Google Cast SDK notification builder does not use notification channels so the system does not allow it to create notifications. As a workaround, for now, app developers are targetting their applications for SDK25 instead. This does mean though that any Android Oreo specific features introduced in SDK26 are unusable for developers which need working Google Cast functionality.

    Thankfully, the issue was reported on the Android issue tracker, marked as fixed and is promised to work properly in future Android versions. If you are an app developer using the Google Cast SDK, it’s recommended for now that you do not build for SDK26 or else you will run into the same issues. Build for SDK25 if you can, as it is the only way to fix the issue. There is no way to fix it yourself. It’s possible that we’ll see Android 8.1 soon, so it should be publicly fixed soon.


    Google Issue Tracker

    Android users report notifications for Google’s Inbox are not working

    You might want to stay away from Google’s Inbox app for Android if you’re waiting on an important email – it turns out the software is suffering from a technical issue that is causing delays in notifications for new emails.

    A litany of miffed users have taken to the Google support forums and Reddit to complain that the latest version of Inbox is no longer automatically notifying them of new emails, unless they manually open and refresh the app.

    Affected users claim they initially began experiencing delays in notifications around September 15, but reports have significantly increased following an update to the Inbox app Google rolled out a couple of days ago on September 27.

    Some users go as far as claiming their Inbox app is serving absolutely no notifications for newly received emails.

    The technical complication seems to impact a variety of phone brands and models, including Samsung Galaxy S6, S7 and S8, Nexus 5X and 6, OnePlus 3, 3T and 5, Google’s own Pixel and Pixel XL, and many more.

    “I am using Inbox on a Samsung GS8 and emails don’t appear unless I open the application and manually refresh the inbox,” one affected user said. “I have uninstalled and reinstalled the application. Restarted the device a number of times too.”

    Here is what another user had to say:

    I am experiencing this issue as well. Inbox by Gmail does not automatically update; it does not matter if the phone is dozing on a counter, or is in my pocket playing music, etc. Regardless of the phone’s current state of activity, when I open the Inbox app it shows a stale Inbox. I need to manually pull down to refresh, and then it will display all my new email. This is particularly dangerous as it means I am not receiving priority notifications any longer.

    Some comments have suggested the issue could be affecting users that have included the Inbox app in their list of apps optimized for battery performance. Still, many users report adjusting the settings hasn’t solved the issue for them.

    TNW was able to reproduce the issue on a Nexus 6P handset with the correct settings.

    A user under the Alias ScottG_TC has since been able to contact the Google team and notify them about the malfunction. He further said they are already investigating the matter.

    In the meantime, you might want to download an additional email client, if you’re expecting any important messages.

    We have contacted Google for further comment and will update this piece accordingly once we hear back.

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    Ring Unveils $199 Home Security System With iPhone Notifications

    Ring today introduced the Ring Protect, a customizable home security system with a companion iPhone app.


    The security system includes a base station, a wall-mounted keypad, one sensor for a window or door, an infrared motion detector, and a Z-Wave extender. Unfortunately, the system doesn’t support HomeKit.

    When activated, if a burglar attempts attempts to break and enter, homeowners immediately receive a notification on their smartphones.


    Ring also offers an optional protection plan with 24/7 professional monitoring, similar to what a company like ADT provides, for $10 per month or $100 per year with no long-term contract. Battery and/or LTE backup allows the monitoring to continue even if the power goes out or broadband is unavailable.

    By comparison, ADT currently charges between $36.99 and $52.99 per month for its monitoring plans in the United States, with a required 36-month contract and a $99 installation fee for the security system.

    Ring said the security system can be easily installed by a homeowner without any tools. It works seamlessly with all of Ring’s other products, including its Video Doorbell, Floodlight Cam, and Spotlight Cam.

    Ring Protect starts at $199, which is considerably cheaper than the Nest Secure at $499. Additional door and window sensors are available for $20, while extra motion detectors cost $30, from Ring’s products page.

    Ring Protect will be available for pre-order starting today at Ring.com, HomeDepot.com, and BestBuy.com, and will be available at physical Home Depot and Best Buy retail stores in the United States later this month.

    Note: Readers outside of the United States may not be able to view the Ring Protect product page on Ring.com.