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Surface Laptop and Windows 10 S review: six months later

813cc_surface-laptop-2017-1 Surface Laptop and Windows 10 S review: six months later

I’ve been using the Surface Laptop and Windows 10 S for six whole months now. Here’s how both have held up.

The Surface Laptop is now six months old. Subsequently, this also means Windows 10 S is six months old today, as Windows 10 S debuted alongside the Surface Laptop back in June. I’ve been using both since June 15, and I wanted to give my thoughts and opinions on both six months on.

Check out our Surface Laptop review

See Surface Laptop at Microsoft Store

Surface Laptop: Still like new

813cc_surface-laptop-2017-1 Surface Laptop and Windows 10 S review: six months later

I know a lot of people had worried that the Alcantara fabric on the keyboard would wear and get dirty over time. I can confirm that this is yet to happen, at least on my machine. Admittedly, I’m not often eating greasy or crummy foods around my Laptop, but I also haven’t seen anyone online complaining about stains in the Alcantara on the Surface Laptop. I imagine there are some cases out there where this has happened, but definitely not on the scale it did with the first generation Alcantara Type Covers.

For those unaware, the Alcantara on the Surface Laptop and new Surface Pro Type Covers is different. This second generation of Alcantara is coated in polyurethane to help fight against stains and marks over time, meaning it’s more durable and should last much longer than the old Type Covers. That’s why my Surface Laptop still looks brand new. I’m using the grey model too, which would likely be the color to show stains and dirt the quickest.

Battery life is still excellent. I’m getting through an entire day with no problems, even after installing all my apps and programs from the Microsoft Store. This is in-part due to Windows 10 S and Microsoft’s promise of excellent battery life for as long as you own the laptop. The charger that the Surface Laptop comes with is good but slightly less powerful than the one that comes with the Surface Book. (Pro tip: You can use the Surface Book charger on the Surface Laptop for faster charging, which is what I’ve been doing for the last six months with no issues.)

813cc_surface-laptop-2017-1 Surface Laptop and Windows 10 S review: six months later

I opted for the Intel Core i5 model with 8GB RAM, which is pretty run of the mill. So far, it’s performed well. At any given time, I’ll have Spotify open, along with around five or six tabs in Edge, a Word document, Slack and GroupMe all open at the same time. The Surface Laptop can handle this workload great, with no real slow downs or noticeable performance drops.

Overall, the Surface Laptop has held up tremendously over the last six months. It still looks new, and I love the form-factor and light weighted-ness. I was a Surface Book user before I made the switch to the Surface Laptop, and I can honestly say that I haven’t missed the Surface Book one bit. In fact, when Microsoft announced the Surface Book 2, it was the first Surface device that I wasn’t super interested in.

Windows 10 S: I forgot I was using it …

813cc_surface-laptop-2017-1 Surface Laptop and Windows 10 S review: six months later

When I first reviewed the Surface Laptop, I said I was going to switch to Windows 10 Pro so that I could have the freedom of installing whatever program I wanted. It was more for the convenience of that freedom than me actually needing software that wasn’t in the Microsoft Store. Regardless, I never actually got around to doing it. I meant to, but it slipped my mind one day, and over time, I forgot that I was even using Windows 10 S.

Windows 10 S has everything I need for a device that’s using a laptop-class processor. Of course, I still need my editing and live streaming software, both of which aren’t available on Windows 10 S, but that’s fine because I have no intention of using the Surface Laptop to edit videos or live stream our podcast. I only ever browse the web, do some email, edit documents in Word or PowerPoint, and communicate with friends and colleagues using apps like GroupMe and Slack on the Laptop.

Windows 10 S Review

I have a powerful desktop at home that I use for all the heavy lifting. I rarely need to do any heavy lifting work when on the go, so the Surface Laptop with Windows 10 S is more than enough for me. But Windows 10 S won’t be for everyone, especially those who swear by Google Chrome or any other browser. To a lot of people, Microsoft Edge still isn’t ready for primetime, which is perfectly understandable.

813cc_surface-laptop-2017-1 Surface Laptop and Windows 10 S review: six months later

However, I’ve been using Microsoft Edge as my default and only browser since it was first made available in beta under the name “Project Spartan” during the development of the first-ever Windows 10 release. I have no issues with it. I love how lightweight and clean the experience is. Admittedly, I’m not big on extensions, which I know many Chrome users depend on.

There hasn’t been a single moment where any Windows 10 S limitation popped up stopping me from doing something I wanted to do. I’ve not once encountered the “You can’t install this app” dialogue or found that I couldn’t change a default app or search engine to something else. I’m perfectly fine with Bing as my default search provider in Edge because Bing is fine. It’s not spectacular or anything, but it gets the job done. And if Bing isn’t sufficient, I just head to Google and do a search query there.

Love at first (and second and third) sight

813cc_surface-laptop-2017-1 Surface Laptop and Windows 10 S review: six months later

Windows 10 S has been more than good to me over the last six months. For about four months of that time, I didn’t even know it was Windows 10 S. That’ means Microsoft is doing a great job at getting all the apps I need into the Microsoft Store. Windows 10 S is only going to improve over time too, with the introduction of features like Sets, Cloud Clipboard and Timeline. I’m very excited to see where Windows 10 S is headed.

Six months on, both the Surface Laptop and Windows 10 S are doing very well. I honestly think the Surface Laptop is the best Surface on the market. I’ve always wanted Microsoft to build a proper laptop, and the Surface Laptop is precisely that. I was a Surface Pro user before the Surface Book came along, and I made the switch to the Book because it was more like a laptop than the Pro. So naturally I made the switch to the Laptop once that came along, and I have loved every minute of it.

See Surface Laptop at Microsoft Store

What 5 months of consistent, healthy weight loss looks like

As You Lose Weight, You Have to Adapt Your Meal Plan

After a few months of adhering to all of the rules I’ve described thus far, I decided it was time to take a deep dive into the Dietary Guidelines and start living by all of the remaining rules. In addition to lowering my calorie allotment from 2500/day to 2100/day (this was due to the fact that I had lost 25 pounds in the first five months of this project!) and adjusting my carbohydrate, fat and protein targets accordingly, I began monitoring my intake of whole grains, vegetables, fruits, dairy, seafood and oils.

Here is what my plan looks like at 2100 calories per day:

  • 6 ounces of grain each day, at least 3 ounces of which are whole grain
  • 2.5 cups of vegetables per day.
  • 2 cups of fruit per day
  • 3 cups of dairy per day
  • 8 ounces per week of seafood
  • 6 teaspoons of oil per day

Back when I started The Lifestyle Project, this set of rules sent me into a bit of a panic — it’s a lot to keep track of. How was I going to balance all of these elements while staying within my calorie limit? The answer: You take it one step at a time.

Now that I’ve been sticking with my lifestyle changes for several months, I feel like I’m more equipped to manage this. I’ve learned what a healthy day of eating feels and looks like and I’m much more mindful about my food consumption. I keep a checklist on my kitchen counter and mark things off as I prepare each meal or snack. It’s a great reminder to add some veggies to my lunch or eat some low-fat dairy as an afternoon snack.

a72e6_daniel-green-rope-jennifer-mesk_fa6f99d1892ed146bb7fda7ed6164cdd.focal-324x211 What 5 months of consistent, healthy weight loss looks like
 When Daniel J. Green got bored, he switched up his workout routine, which boosted his results. Jennifer Mesk Photography / Jennifer Mesk Photography

The Importance of Progressive Workouts

Even though I work with the American Council on Exercise and know how important it is to keep moving, an ever-growing list of aches and pains repeatedly derailed my exercise efforts in the past. For that reason, I started at the low end of the recommendations of the Physical Activity Guidelines.

Day 1

My weekly goals at the outset were as follows:

  • 150 minutes of moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise, usually on the treadmill, elliptical machine or hiking trails
  • Two full-body resistance training sessions, which in the early stages consisted primarily of functional training movements, flexibility training, and core strengthening

Months 2–4

I learned pretty quickly that building up the duration of my cardio workouts was going to be key, so my goal in these early months was to increase duration rather than intensity. The longer I could sustain a cardio workout, the fewer sessions I’d have to try to fit into a week. To reach 150 minutes, I could do five 30-minute workouts, four 40-minute workouts or three 50-minute workouts. For some context, when I first joined the gym about 18 months before beginning this project, I could only perform eight minutes of exercise on the elliptical machine at a time.

When I first joined the gym, I could only perform eight minutes of exercise on the elliptical machine at a time.

When I first joined the gym, I could only perform eight minutes of exercise on the elliptical machine at a time.

When it came to resistance training, I finally felt comfortable (after years of starts and stops) with adding more intensity and lifting heavier weights. I kept my focus on proper function and good form, but decided that it was time to push myself a bit by slowly and steadily progressing these workouts.

Change Up Your Workouts to Avoid Boredom

After five months I’d grown a little bored with my gym-based workouts, as 40 or 50 minutes of churning away on the elliptical machine performing a steady-state workout was getting less and less inspiring.

In an effort to reinvigorate my cardio workouts, I decided to introduce interval training to my routine. Interval training involves performing periods of vigorous-intensity exercise, alternated with periods of moderate-intensity recovery. Adding interval training to the mix also means that I’m moving into the vigorous portion of the Physical Activity Guidelines.

Similarly, my resistance-training workouts now feature some power training and light plyometric movements in addition to some traditional strength-training exercises.

How Do You Lose Weight? Take it One Step at a Time

The biggest lesson I’ve learned in my quest for lifestyle change, is that sweeping changes are not the solution. Instead, it’s about making small adjustments to your routine and sticking with them until they become habits.

I challenge you — as I challenge myself every day — to find small ways to make positive changes to your lifestyle. Can you add five minutes to your cardio routine? Can you modify a strength-training exercise to incorporate the need for balance or core strength? Can you eat a new vegetable or re-try one you’ve shunned in the past? Can you add some protein to your afternoon snack?

Small changes add up over time, but that’s true whether the changes are moving you in a positive or negative direction. It’s up to you to make sure you’re on path to better health.

I’m proud that NBC News BETTER invited me to share my journey with you through the completion of The Lifestyle Project and beyond, and now I want to hear from you.

Do you have any tips to share? Tell me about them. Have questions about my journey? Ask me on Twitter or follow me on Instagram.

What 5 months of consistent, healthy weight loss looks like

As You Lose Weight, You Have to Adapt Your Meal Plan

After a few months of adhering to all of the rules I’ve described thus far, I decided it was time to take a deep dive into the Dietary Guidelines and start living by all of the remaining rules. In addition to lowering my calorie allotment from 2500/day to 2100/day (this was due to the fact that I had lost 25 pounds in the first five months of this project!) and adjusting my carbohydrate, fat and protein targets accordingly, I began monitoring my intake of whole grains, vegetables, fruits, dairy, seafood and oils.

Here is what my plan looks like at 2100 calories per day:

  • 6 ounces of grain each day, at least 3 ounces of which are whole grain
  • 2.5 cups of vegetables per day.
  • 2 cups of fruit per day
  • 3 cups of dairy per day
  • 8 ounces per week of seafood
  • 6 teaspoons of oil per day

Back when I started The Lifestyle Project, this set of rules sent me into a bit of a panic — it’s a lot to keep track of. How was I going to balance all of these elements while staying within my calorie limit? The answer: You take it one step at a time.

Now that I’ve been sticking with my lifestyle changes for several months, I feel like I’m more equipped to manage this. I’ve learned what a healthy day of eating feels and looks like and I’m much more mindful about my food consumption. I keep a checklist on my kitchen counter and mark things off as I prepare each meal or snack. It’s a great reminder to add some veggies to my lunch or eat some low-fat dairy as an afternoon snack.

80940_daniel-green-rope-jennifer-mesk_fa6f99d1892ed146bb7fda7ed6164cdd.focal-324x211 What 5 months of consistent, healthy weight loss looks like
 When Daniel J. Green got bored, he switched up his workout routine, which boosted his results. Jennifer Mesk Photography / Jennifer Mesk Photography

The Importance of Progressive Workouts

Even though I work with the American Council on Exercise and know how important it is to keep moving, an ever-growing list of aches and pains repeatedly derailed my exercise efforts in the past. For that reason, I started at the low end of the recommendations of the Physical Activity Guidelines.

Day 1

My weekly goals at the outset were as follows:

  • 150 minutes of moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise, usually on the treadmill, elliptical machine or hiking trails
  • Two full-body resistance training sessions, which in the early stages consisted primarily of functional training movements, flexibility training, and core strengthening

Months 2–4

I learned pretty quickly that building up the duration of my cardio workouts was going to be key, so my goal in these early months was to increase duration rather than intensity. The longer I could sustain a cardio workout, the fewer sessions I’d have to try to fit into a week. To reach 150 minutes, I could do five 30-minute workouts, four 40-minute workouts or three 50-minute workouts. For some context, when I first joined the gym about 18 months before beginning this project, I could only perform eight minutes of exercise on the elliptical machine at a time.

When I first joined the gym, I could only perform eight minutes of exercise on the elliptical machine at a time.

When I first joined the gym, I could only perform eight minutes of exercise on the elliptical machine at a time.

When it came to resistance training, I finally felt comfortable (after years of starts and stops) with adding more intensity and lifting heavier weights. I kept my focus on proper function and good form, but decided that it was time to push myself a bit by slowly and steadily progressing these workouts.

Change Up Your Workouts to Avoid Boredom

After five months I’d grown a little bored with my gym-based workouts, as 40 or 50 minutes of churning away on the elliptical machine performing a steady-state workout was getting less and less inspiring.

In an effort to reinvigorate my cardio workouts, I decided to introduce interval training to my routine. Interval training involves performing periods of vigorous-intensity exercise, alternated with periods of moderate-intensity recovery. Adding interval training to the mix also means that I’m moving into the vigorous portion of the Physical Activity Guidelines.

Similarly, my resistance-training workouts now feature some power training and light plyometric movements in addition to some traditional strength-training exercises.

How Do You Lose Weight? Take it One Step at a Time

The biggest lesson I’ve learned in my quest for lifestyle change, is that sweeping changes are not the solution. Instead, it’s about making small adjustments to your routine and sticking with them until they become habits.

I challenge you — as I challenge myself every day — to find small ways to make positive changes to your lifestyle. Can you add five minutes to your cardio routine? Can you modify a strength-training exercise to incorporate the need for balance or core strength? Can you eat a new vegetable or re-try one you’ve shunned in the past? Can you add some protein to your afternoon snack?

Small changes add up over time, but that’s true whether the changes are moving you in a positive or negative direction. It’s up to you to make sure you’re on path to better health.

I’m proud that NBC News BETTER invited me to share my journey with you through the completion of The Lifestyle Project and beyond, and now I want to hear from you.

Do you have any tips to share? Tell me about them. Have questions about my journey? Ask me on Twitter or follow me on Instagram.

Health concerns swirl in Texas months after floods from Harvey spread toxic waste

Three months after Hurricane Harvey struck the shores of Texas, some local environmental groups say they are in the dark about the safety of federal Superfund sites damaged during the storm.

In the days following the hurricane that made landfall there on August 25, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said at least 13 of the 34 of the state’s federal Superfund sites in the path of the storm had been affected by widespread flooding and heavy rains. By Sept. 8, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said only two of those sites had incurred damages.

Since the hurricane, the EPA mandated that two companies deemed responsible parties spend at least $115 million cleaning up one: the San Jacinto River Waste Pits. The site is located in the middle of the San Jacinto River about 20 miles east of Houston, where “highly toxic dioxin contamination,” known to cause host of health problems including cancer and developmental and reproductive issues, leaked out after flood waters tore through it.

But some residents are questioning the methods used to test that site and surrounding communities, as well as the EPA’s designation of at least 12 other federal Superfund sites “cleared” from damages since Hurricane Harvey. These concerns come as officials said that the amount of dioxin released into the San Jacinto River may never be known.

The lack of information about how the Superfund sites might influence the river’s overall water quality and surrounding communities worries Jackie Young, founder of the environmental group Texas Health Environment Alliance.

“My biggest issue with the response to Hurricane Harvey was that for a month after we were pressing the EPA, we were pressing our local and state government on the safety of the local environment and the safety of these sites, and we were repeatedly told that everything was okay,” Young told the NewsHour Weekend.

The San Jacinto River Waste Pits date back to the 1960s when toxic waste from paper mills was routinely dumped. The pits were designated a Superfund site in 2008. Since 2011, the waste, which is made up of dangerous dioxins and furans, has been temporarily held in place by an “armored cap.” The site is located in proximity to some of Harris County’s more than 4.5 million residents, including the city of Houston.

7095e_san_jac2_0 Health concerns swirl in Texas months after floods from Harvey spread toxic waste

Aerial view of San Jacinto cap. Photo from the EPA

Preliminary data from the EPA indicated that in sediment samples taken around the site, dioxins levels spiked 2,300 times above acceptable levels.

Part of the EPA’s recovery plan is to remove most of the nearly 212,000 cubic yards of toxic waste at the San Jacinto site in the coming years. But it’s difficult to establish how much of the waste escaped into the river and nearby bayou, Samuel Coleman, the EPA’s acting regional administrator, told NewsHour Weekend.

He told a Congressional subcommittee in November testimony that one of the tactics the EPA used in the aftermath was a mobile lab capable of evaluating water samples “that proved to be invaluable in an area this is devastated and lacking in basic infrastructure.”

But more than a week after Harvey bore down on Texas on Aug. 25, the flooded Superfund sites had received only aerial inspections, EPA officials said.

Federal and local officials contend that access to those sites in the wake of the late August storm was limited, and that they quickly determined some sites, including the San Jacinto River Waste Pits and another called the U.S. Oil Recovery, had released toxic waste into surrounding waterways.

Bob Allen, the director of the Harris County Pollution Control Services, cited the complications of observing possible breaches at Superfund sites as flooding continued to grip the Houston area.

“Yes, waste got out in the river but how much is difficult to determine,” Allen said. “I think that both the locals and the feds and the state, we’re doing as much as we can. It’s a difficult site. It’s probably the most challenging site I’ve ever seen and I’ve been here almost 40 years.”

What about the surrounding community?

Rosanne Barone, of the advocacy group Texas Campaign for the Environment, said she worries about the river and several downstream bays that are popular with fishermen and for recreational use, both of which help feed the local economy.

Barone added that while many of the Superfund sites have been deemed secure by federal officials, a dearth of public data also raises questions about the potential long-term health effects on residents of the community.
“As far as damage to the other sites and cleanup, still not much is known,” Barone said.

Young said in some cases it took the EPA, and companies responsible for overseeing some of the Superfund sites, weeks to begin conducting thorough inspections after the flooding.

A NewsHour Weekend analysis of EPA documents showed that some soil and water sampling from those two Superfund sites began on Sept. 4. Sampling at 11 other sites that were flooded during the storm did not begin until at least Sept. 10.

Since then, Young’s office has been inundated with calls from concerned residents who live near the San Jacinto River, and other areas, some who live near the San Jacinto River Waste Pits.

“These are people who can literally see the waste from their homes,” Young said.

7095e_san_jac2_0 Health concerns swirl in Texas months after floods from Harvey spread toxic waste

Greg Moss’s flooded home after Harvey. Photo Courtesy of Greg Moss

Greg Moss, 62, is a retired boat mechanic who lives just upriver from the San Jacinto River Waste Pits. His home and workshop are located adjacent to the river and two blocks from the Superfund site.

Moss said since the 1990s he has lived in the San Jacinto River Estates neighborhood known to locals as “River Bottom.” But he said he wasn’t aware of the toxic waste that was found nearby until 2011, long after he would ride his jet skis through the river’s murky waters or take joy-rides on his four-wheeler through the mud of the Superfund site.

7095e_san_jac2_0 Health concerns swirl in Texas months after floods from Harvey spread toxic waste

Greg Moss’s flooded home after Harvey. Photo Courtesy of Greg Moss

Moss said when the “tide surge” from Hurricane Harvey caused water to rise 113 inches into the shop he uses to fix motor boats, and 8 inches into his elevated home next door, he was trapped for days along with his dog until rescue workers took them out by boat.

A week later, when he returned home, the stench of mud and foul water was overwhelming and the months-long cleanup process was just beginning.

Moss cut out the damaged floor of his house and a portion of his wall, and used vinegar and peroxide to scour his shop. All the while, he said, he worried about how many toxins were now in his home.

“What else do you do with it?” he said. “You’ve got to have a place to live.”

‘Historic contamination’ predates Hurricane Harvey

Allen said he doesn’t necessarily agree that the federal government was slow to release information to the public, citing a confluence of data from various governmental agencies and private companies in the months following the storm.

“As soon as Harvey happened, as soon as it was safe enough to look at these sites the EPA was down here,” Allen said.

And Coleman said federal employees conducted a “detailed inspection” of the San Jacinto site, using boats to survey at least two areas that were breached and putting divers in the water amid zero visibility to collect water and sediment samples.

“Where the cap was breached, we did find some exposed dioxin and we collected samples, along with the responsible parties, who collected samples, to confirm that it was dioxin and it was dioxin waste that was placed in the waste pit,” Coleman said. “That was repaired immediately.”

But Coleman said “historic contamination” predating Hurricane Harvey has also created problems in the nearby Houston Ship Channel and other local waterways including the San Jacinto River.

“The San Jacinto Waste Pits was a contributor to that, not the only contributor,” he said.

7095e_san_jac2_0 Health concerns swirl in Texas months after floods from Harvey spread toxic waste

An aerial view of INEOS Phenol (L) and the Sam Houston Ship Channel Bridge is seen in Pasadena, Texas, U.S. August 31, 2017. Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters

Coleman said after the hurricane, federal officials have left some of the testing and research on potential health effects up to state and county officials.

Scott Jones, of the Galveston Bay Foundation, said his group recently secured a $250,000 grant to test fish populations in the San Jacinto River and other nearby waterways after Harris County officials called for additional studies. But the results of those tests will be unavailable for at least a year.

“There’s just multiple sites unfortunately in this area with all of the petrochemical we’ve had in the past and we had a lot of you know past practices or lack of practices way back in the day,” Jones said. “So I hear from people mainly around the center of the waste pits that they’re definitely concerned about it.”

On Friday, the EPA announced it added the San Jacinto River Waste Pits to a list of 21 Superfund sites slated to receive “immediate and intense attention.” The list was created by the Superfund Task Force, formed in July by EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, who visited the site along the San Jacinto River in September.

But Coleman said the process to clean up the San Jacinto River Waste Pits would likely take more than four years. The first year or two would be spent in negotiations with the two companies — International Paper and McGinnis Industrial Maintenance Corporation — which would be responsible for the cleanup.

And in a region known for storms and hurricanes, some advocates say that timeline could make the situation even more tenuous.

“The whole Superfund process is just so screwed up for a number of reasons that these sites just sit there with these highly toxic materials just sitting there right in the open, right in the middle of people’s areas where they live,” Barone said. “They were causing problems anyway and then when a hurricane hits it just makes it a million times worse.”

Internet and phone outage strikes valley for third time in 4 months

While not as extensive as the Nov. 22 outage, Chaffee County experienced another temporary outage of internet and telephone service through Charter Spectrum Tuesday, which also affected the 911 system, Sheriff John Spezze said.

“This seems as though it’s becoming more and more common,” Spezze said. “You’re always supposed to have 911 service. I’ve tested it in several spots throughout the county, and it was spotty.

“It’s beginning to make me mad. I’ve tried to contact someone to ask about it, but they won’t call me back. If this happened in Denver, it would be a huge problem, but it doesn’t seem to matter out in a rural area.”

It was the third outage in the last four months. Representatives from Charter Spectrum said the first three were caused by fiberoptic lines being cut.

“An issue on a third-party carrier’s network impacted services for Spectrum customers in Chaffee County,” Bret Picciolo, a Charter Spectrum representative said about Tuesday’s outage.

“While this incident is unrelated to other recent service disruptions, we are working with partners locally to explore options that would increase reliability in the area.”

Gyff Lacy, co-owner of Buena Vista Automotive, said, “It’s getting to be too regular, it’s getting to be a pain. We can’t afford to be shut down like this.”

Lacy said they were unable to order parts, process credit and debit cards or receive calls from customers.

Gyff’s brother Duff Lacy, who is also a co-owner of Buena Vista Auto, is a town trustee who said this in a conversation about improving broadband speeds in town last month:

“What I need is reliability,” Duff Lacy said. “All that speed doesn’t matter if you’re not getting it.”

Lucas Smith, owner and pharmacist at Buena Vista Drug, said he was planning on changing from Charter Spectrum to CenturyLink for his phone service, so at least one stays up.

He said the outages really hurt his business because he can’t call in prescriptions, and he has no choice but to send people across the street to City Market, which has a satellite backup.

“I can get some stuff done if I have one, but with both (internet and phone) out, I’m stuck,” Smith said. “It’s frustrating. That means it’s more expensive for me because I can’t bundle them.”

Some shops, like Midland Station coffee shop and Jailhouse Craft Beer bar, make do by using point-of-sale systems that save credit cards internally, but those cards aren’t billed until the internet connection comes back.

Lori Roberts, Heart of the Rockies Chamber of Commerce executive director, said the chamber had not receive any calls about Tuesday’s outage, but several businesses contacted the chamber after the November outage.

“One of the big problems during the November outage was people were unable to contact us,” Roberts said.

Roberts said she also visited some businesses downtown on Tuesday.

She said one business she spoke to couldn’t open because it couldn’t complete credit or debit card transactions.

“Fortunately we are not too far into the holiday shopping season yet,” Roberts said. “If it had been a big shopping weekend, it could have been much worse.”

Times reporter Max Smith contributed to this story.

Internet and phone outage strikes valley for third time in 4 months

While not as extensive as the Nov. 22 outage, Chaffee County experienced another temporary outage of internet and telephone service through Charter Spectrum Tuesday, which also affected the 911 system, Sheriff John Spezze said.

“This seems as though it’s becoming more and more common,” Spezze said. “You’re always supposed to have 911 service. I’ve tested it in several spots throughout the county, and it was spotty.

“It’s beginning to make me mad. I’ve tried to contact someone to ask about it, but they won’t call me back. If this happened in Denver, it would be a huge problem, but it doesn’t seem to matter out in a rural area.”

It was the third outage in the last four months. Representatives from Charter Spectrum said the first three were caused by fiberoptic lines being cut.

“An issue on a third-party carrier’s network impacted services for Spectrum customers in Chaffee County,” Bret Picciolo, a Charter Spectrum representative said about Tuesday’s outage.

“While this incident is unrelated to other recent service disruptions, we are working with partners locally to explore options that would increase reliability in the area.”

Gyff Lacy, co-owner of Buena Vista Automotive, said, “It’s getting to be too regular, it’s getting to be a pain. We can’t afford to be shut down like this.”

Lacy said they were unable to order parts, process credit and debit cards or receive calls from customers.

Gyff’s brother Duff Lacy, who is also a co-owner of Buena Vista Auto, is a town trustee who said this in a conversation about improving broadband speeds in town last month:

“What I need is reliability,” Duff Lacy said. “All that speed doesn’t matter if you’re not getting it.”

Lucas Smith, owner and pharmacist at Buena Vista Drug, said he was planning on changing from Charter Spectrum to CenturyLink for his phone service, so at least one stays up.

He said the outages really hurt his business because he can’t call in prescriptions, and he has no choice but to send people across the street to City Market, which has a satellite backup.

“I can get some stuff done if I have one, but with both (internet and phone) out, I’m stuck,” Smith said. “It’s frustrating. That means it’s more expensive for me because I can’t bundle them.”

Some shops, like Midland Station coffee shop and Jailhouse Craft Beer bar, make do by using point-of-sale systems that save credit cards internally, but those cards aren’t billed until the internet connection comes back.

Lori Roberts, Heart of the Rockies Chamber of Commerce executive director, said the chamber had not receive any calls about Tuesday’s outage, but several businesses contacted the chamber after the November outage.

“One of the big problems during the November outage was people were unable to contact us,” Roberts said.

Roberts said she also visited some businesses downtown on Tuesday.

She said one business she spoke to couldn’t open because it couldn’t complete credit or debit card transactions.

“Fortunately we are not too far into the holiday shopping season yet,” Roberts said. “If it had been a big shopping weekend, it could have been much worse.”

Times reporter Max Smith contributed to this story.

Northbrook chiropractor sentenced to 20 months for health care fraud

A Northbrook chiropractor was sentenced to 20 months in federal prison Tuesday for billing an insurance carrier for medically unnecessary or nonexistent services, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

Steven Paul, 46, of Northbrook, previously pleaded guilty to one count of health care fraud. Judge Ronald A. Guzman cited Paul’s “extraordinary cooperation” during the investigation as he imposted the lowest possible prison sentence for the charge, according to a U.S. Attorney’s Office news release.

Paul and co-defendant Bradley Mattson, a chiropractor, stated in plea agreements that they required patients to receive an initial x-ray and a pre-set schedule of clinic visits for a period of six months “without regard to the medical necessity of the visits,” according to the release.

Paul stated that from 1999 to 2008 he directed $3.65 million in bills to Blue Cross Blue Shield for medically unnecessary tests or physical therapy services that were not provided, and his clinics received $1.33 million in fraudulent reimbursements from the insurance company, prosecutors said.

Two Months After Maria, Puerto Rico’s Health System Struggles to Meet Needs

Two months after Hurricane Maria tore across the island, Puerto Rico’s health-care system is still struggling. Storm damage and power outages remain problems especially in rural areas where access is still difficult, say medical volunteers and relief workers who have worked on the U.S. territory in recent weeks.

In the mountainous central region of Utuado, Catherine Trossello, a nurse practitioner with Callen-Lorde Community Health Center in New York, worked a few weeks ago with a local health-care provider who was trying to track down patients he hadn’t seen since the storm. He made house calls. She set up a walk-in clinic in another part of town he couldn’t reach.

“People are on foot, going door to door, doing the best they can, but the whole network is so disrupted,” Ms. Trossello said. “Everybody’s trying so hard. But you can only walk so many miles in a day and knock on so many doors at a time.”

31ae5_BN-WE890_PRHEAL_P_20171117125525 Two Months After Maria, Puerto Rico's Health System Struggles to Meet Needs

Recovery from the most powerful storm to hit the island in almost a century is halting at best. Half of Puerto Rico’s electric grid remains down, leaving many of the island’s 3.4 million residents exposed to the heat and unable to keep food or medicines cool without generators. Telephone service remains spotty and travel can be treacherous, exacerbating isolation.

Most Puerto Rican hospitals have regained power, though the island’s grid remains shaky and generators still keep one in five hospitals running, according to recent Federal Emergency Management Agency data. Seventeen hospitals lacked phone service, FEMA said.

Puerto Rico’s network of more than 90 largely rural federally funded primary care clinics have mostly reopened, but half remain on backup generators, limiting some services, said Katia Leon, deputy director of an association representing the clinics.

But the overall conditions, especially the absence of power, have exacerbated illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease with potentially life-threatening consequences, said medical volunteers working with the nonprofit Americares, which has hired nurses and organized pop-up clinics in western and central Puerto Rico. Lack of clean water has led to skin rashes and gastrointestinal illnesses, they said. Mold flourishing in storm-damaged buildings has made it harder to breathe for others.

Federally operated health-care shelters and temporary emergency rooms have seen a stream of chronically ill patients following an initial wave of those who suffered storm-related injuries, which is typical after disasters, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

But unlike other disasters, chronically ill patients in who lack oxygen or dialysis are staying longer under federal care in Puerto Rico, because those life-saving medical supplies can’t be found elsewhere, according to HHS.

Americares has set up clinics in abandoned gas stations and empty bus terminals around the countryside to offer primary health services to rural communities.

Some residents had gone without medication or basic medical care since Maria hit, said doctors with the MediSys Health Network in New York who returned Nov. 8 after two weeks of working in Puerto Rico. Many residents had unhealthy blood pressure or blood sugar after going without daily medication, which put them at risk for heart attack and stroke.

On house calls in rural Puerto Rico, medical teams met residents in need of emergency care after going too long without help, including one man without phone service who had dangerously low blood pressure and rectal bleeding, said MediSys physician Celine Thum.

Raul Pineda, a medical team coordinator for Americares, which set up a pop-up clinic in Vieques last week, said a diabetic man there who had gone without insulin since the storm had to be airlifted to the main island for treatment last week. The man had two toes amputated, he said.

More than 700 people have sought care in the last month from clinics like the one in Vieques, an Americares spokeswoman said, many of whom hadn’t seen a doctor since Maria. The nonprofit has so far shipped $32 million in medications and other supplies to the island.

After Hurricane Maria hit, Felicita Dones, 89, could no longer stay in her nursing home in Juncos, in the eastern part of the island, because of a loss of power and water.

Ms. Dones, who has a variety of medical issues including glaucoma, blindness, high blood pressure and circulation problems, wasn’t getting adequate care on the island. So her daughter, Petra Seda, who lives in Orlando, Fla., decided she had to bring her mother to the mainland. But that too has challenges, like enrolling Ms. Dones in a Medicare plan and trying to secure her a cornea procedure.

“It’s difficult,” Ms. Seda said. “She doesn’t accept having to live in these circumstances.”

Write to Melanie Evans at Melanie.Evans@wsj.com

The iPhone X won’t be in stock consistently for months

After initial doom-and-gloom warnings about severe iPhone X shortages at launch, things are looking up. If you order a phone right now from Apple’s online store, you’re looking at a ship time of two to three weeks, which is a dramatic improvement on the six-week wait times when the iPhone X hadn’t launched yet.

But you still shouldn’t expect the phone to be consistently in stock — as in, being able to pop down the Apple Store on your way to work to pick one up — for a while. Apple doesn’t comment on its stock levels or manufacturing plans, but the carriers (who still sell around 75% of iPhones) do, and their forecast isn’t all that great.

Speaking at an investor conference, T-Mobile CFO Braxton Carter predicted that demand for the iPhone X would “roll over” into the first quarter of 2018. According to a write-up of the event from MobileWorldLive, Braxton predicted that “going into the holiday season we do think we will still be overall supply constrained,” so there won’t be consistent stock in T-Mobile stores over Christmas, at the very least.

This might ultimately be the “super-cycle” of iPhone upgrades that some analysts were predicted. For most phone launches, manufacturers see a bump in demand for the months immediately following the launch, and then sales tail off, and return to the regular sales pattern. But with the iPhone X, it seems that the surge in demand will last for nearly six months. What Braxton was getting at in his comments is that customers will have seen the iPhone X launch in September, planned on buying one more or less right away, but won’t actually go to the store and buy the phone until 2018. That’s unusual, and shows the amount of interest that Apple has managed to generate in its shiniest new gadget.

Internet delay kept Barre police out of new headquarters for 4 months

BARRE – More than 100 turned out on a sultry July afternoon to witness the dedication of the Stephen M. Brewer Public Safety Building, 455 South St.

On a blustery mid-November day, the building remains all but devoid of life, as Police Chief John F. Carbone, officers and patrolmen work from quarters on the first floor of the Henry Woods Municipal Building, home of the Barre Police Department for decades.

But not much longer, according to Andrew M. Golas, town administrator, who said Thursday that Dec. 15 is the target date for occupancy.

Mr. Golas said internet connection issues were responsible for the four-month delay.

He said it was after the dedication, and only a couple of weeks on the job, that he became aware that discussions with Charter Communications for the installation of fiber internet services had stalled.

With no internet service in place at the site, the building could not be used until the problem was resolved, the administrator said.

Mr. Golas said he subsequently learned that discussions with Charter had ended in March without a contract being signed.

“I immediately began working with our legislators to restart negotiations and I was finally able to complete a contract with Charter at the end of September for the installation of fiber service,” he said.

The administrator said the latest word from the Charter construction manager calls for installation of the fiber service on Nov. 30 with a “go live” date of Dec. 15.

“I’m optimistic this will be a date for full occupancy of the building,” he said.

The administrator said the Fire Department has used the building to house one of the town’s two ambulances since shortly after the dedication, not having the same need as the police department for an internet connection.

The second ambulance is housed at fire station on School Street North.

As for other punch list items incomplete as of the dedication, Mr. Golas said, “At this point all monetized punch list items have been addressed.”

He said the town has followed up on warranty issues relating to the HVAC system and internal doors that needed to be adjusted as the building settled.

Charles R. Chase, selectmen chairman, said town officials at the July dedication were unaware of any contractual issues that would delay the police department’s move to the new public safety building.

“We ran into the contract issue with Charter and it took calls to Rep. Donnie Berthiuame’s office and Sen. Anne Gobi’s office to get this back on track,” Mr. Chase said.

The selectman added, “This was really ironic considering Barre’s cable contract is with Charter. It was frustrating, especially considering the service we needed didn’t require any additional construction on their part and was for a public safety building.”

Mr. Brewer said he was very disappointed in Charter’s performance with respect to providing internet service to the building.

“Public safety is a priority, and the police department absolutely cannot function without this access. The building since the dedication has been like a prom date dressed up for the big event waiting patiently for the limo to arrive,” the retired legislator said.

He added that selectmen may want to remind Charter of this delay when the company’s license comes up for renewal.

Heidi Vandenbrouck, senior communications manager for Charter Communications in New England said, “We’re on track to complete the installation ahead of the timeline specified in our contract with the town.”

At the dedication ceremony Chief Carbone called the new facility “a game changer” and said the building represented “a big step for the department with the ability to process and hold prisoners here.”

“We now have an evidence-processing room and facilities throughout that will allow us to do a lot more things in a professional setting,” he said.

The building was made possible as a result of a $3 million earmark in the state budget while then state Sen. Stephen M. Brewer was chairman of the Senate Ways and Means Committee.

Asked at the time if the police department got everything it needed for the $3.2 million, Chief Carbone said, “I don’t want to compare this facility to what other departments have in other towns. Compared with what we have now, yes, we got everything we were looking for.”

“It’s great to have EMS in this building, and I look forward to eventually having the Fire Department here as well,” the chief said.

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Microsoft grants enterprises 6 more months of support for Windows 10 1511

Microsoft has reversed the retirement of Windows 10 version 1511, extending support for the 2015 feature upgrade by six months for commercial customers.

“To help some early enterprise adopters that are still finishing their transition to Windows as a service, we will be providing a supplemental servicing package for Windows 10, version 1511, for an additional six months, until April 2018,” said Michael Niehaus, director of product marketing for Windows, in a post to a company blog.

The additional support, which Niehaus indicated would be limited to patches for security vulnerabilities rated “Critical” or “Important” — Microsoft’s two top categories in its four-level system — will be distributed “via all normal channels,” including Windows Update, Windows Server Update Service (WSUS), System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) and the for-manual-download Microsoft Update catalog.

Only Windows 10 Enterprise 1511 and Windows 10 Education 1511 will be extended in this way, Niehaus added. The new cutoff will probably be April 10, 2018, that month’s Patch Tuesday.

Microsoft grants enterprises 6 more months of support for Windows 10 1511

Microsoft has reversed the retirement of Windows 10 version 1511, extending support for the 2015 feature upgrade by six months for commercial customers.

“To help some early enterprise adopters that are still finishing their transition to Windows as a service, we will be providing a supplemental servicing package for Windows 10, version 1511, for an additional six months, until April 2018,” said Michael Niehaus, director of product marketing for Windows, in a post to a company blog.

The additional support, which Niehaus indicated would be limited to patches for security vulnerabilities rated “Critical” or “Important” — Microsoft’s two top categories in its four-level system — will be distributed “via all normal channels,” including Windows Update, Windows Server Update Service (WSUS), System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) and the for-manual-download Microsoft Update catalog.

Only Windows 10 Enterprise 1511 and Windows 10 Education 1511 will be extended in this way, Niehaus added. The new cutoff will probably be April 10, 2018, that month’s Patch Tuesday.

Windows 10 1511 debuted Nov. 10, 2015, and for other editions, including Home and Pro, fell off the support list on Oct. 10, 2017.

Under its Windows-as-a-service (WaaS) model, Microsoft releases two feature upgrades annually at six-month intervals, and then supports each upgrade for 18 months. However, 1511 was given a 23-month support lifecycle, with the additional time arising from an arcane rule Microsoft implemented but later discarded; it would not retire an upgrade before six months had passed from the most recent upgrade’s release.

With the extension, Windows 10 Enterprise 1511 and Education 1511 get a total of 29 months of support, nearly as long a stretch as the historical intervals between major pre-0 versions of the OS, such as the 36 months between Windows 7 and Windows 8, or the 34 months between Windows 8 and Windows 10.

Ironically, the successor to 1511, the mid-2016 feature upgrade designated 1607, will now, absent another Microsoft intervention, exit support in March 2018, before its predecessor. That’s not how it’s supposed to work.

Enterprise, Education users get six more months of support for …

Microsoft is providing Windows 10 Enterprise and Education users still on Version 1511 with more time to move to a newer version of the operating system.

135b7_win101511getsmoresecurityupdates Enterprise, Education users get six more months of support for ...

Microsoft officials said on November 14 that “some early enterprise adopters that are still finishing their transition to Windows a service” will get security fixes until April 2018. The official cut-off date for support for Windows 10 1511 was October 10, 2017.

This extra six months of support won’t be offered to users of other versions of Windows 10 1511 (which Microsoft started rolling out to mainstream users in November 2015), officials said. That means Windows 10 Home, Pro, Mobile and Mobile Enterprise must be on Windows 10 Version 1607 or higher to continue to get security and other updates.

Microsoft will make both “critical” and “important” security updates available to Enterprise and Education users running 1511 via all normal channels, including Windows Update, WSUS, Configuration Manager, and the Windows Update catalog.

The “supplemental servicing” for Windows 10 1511 Enterprise and Education users won’t require any additional fees, a spokesperson said.

Microsoft officials denied that this support extension is due to any particular problems users may be experiencing in moving from 1511 to a more recent release of Windows 10.

“Customers with large, complex IT environments are still transitioning into the Windows as a Service model,” said a company spokesperson when I asked for reasons for Microsoft’s latest support extension. “Our early adopter customers are actively moving forward and asked for a few more months to finish their updates.”

“The supplemental servicing security updates are in response to enterprise and education customers with broad early adoption of Windows 10, who are actively moving to Windows as a Service, and are focused specifically to keep them compliant on 1511 while they finish their updates,” the spokesperson added.

Microsoft is currently supporting each new Windows 10 feature update for 18 months from the time it begins rolling out to mainstream users.

The successor to 1511, known as Windows 10 1607 — which began rolling out in August 2017 — is currently slated to be supported until some time in March 2018. Version 1703, which began rolling out in April 2017, is slated to exit support in September 2018, and the just-released Windows 10 version 1709, which began rolling out in October 2017, should be supported until March 2019.

Enterprise, Education users get six more months of support for Windows 10 1511

Microsoft is providing Windows 10 Enterprise and Education users still on Version 1511 with more time to move to a newer version of the operating system.

7c926_win101511getsmoresecurityupdates Enterprise, Education users get six more months of support for Windows 10 1511

Microsoft officials said on November 14 that “some early enterprise adopters that are still finishing their transition to Windows a service” will get security fixes until April 2018. The official cut-off date for support for Windows 10 1511 was October 10, 2017.

This extra six months of support won’t be offered to users of other versions of Windows 10 1511 (which Microsoft started rolling out to mainstream users in November 2015), officials said. That means Windows 10 Home, Pro, Mobile and Mobile Enterprise must be on Windows 10 Version 1607 or higher to continue to get security and other updates.

Microsoft will make both “critical” and “important” security updates available to Enterprise and Education users running 1511 via all normal channels, including Windows Update, WSUS, Configuration Manager, and the Windows Update catalog.

The “supplemental servicing” for Windows 10 1511 Enterprise and Education users won’t require any additional fees, a spokesperson said.

Microsoft officials denied that this support extension is due to any particular problems users may be experiencing in moving from 1511 to a more recent release of Windows 10.

“Customers with large, complex IT environments are still transitioning into the Windows as a Service model,” said a company spokesperson when I asked for reasons for Microsoft’s latest support extension. “Our early adopter customers are actively moving forward and asked for a few more months to finish their updates.”

“The supplemental servicing security updates are in response to enterprise and education customers with broad early adoption of Windows 10, who are actively moving to Windows as a Service, and are focused specifically to keep them compliant on 1511 while they finish their updates,” the spokesperson added.

Microsoft is currently supporting each new Windows 10 feature update for 18 months from the time it begins rolling out to mainstream users.

The successor to 1511, known as Windows 10 1607 — which began rolling out in August 2017 — is currently slated to be supported until some time in March 2018. Version 1703, which began rolling out in April 2017, is slated to exit support in September 2018, and the just-released Windows 10 version 1709, which began rolling out in October 2017, should be supported until March 2019.

A Computer Glitch Likely Extended a Man’s Jail Sentence by Five Months

The error stems from a plea bargain that Reyes made in October 2015, in which he agreed to plead guilty to misdemeanor sexual misconduct, assault, and unlawful imprisonment. In exchange, prosecutors would drop the felony charges that they had initially filed against him. However, the jail’s digital record system showed that Reyes’s felony charges were still pending, so the corrections staff failed to release him on the proper date.

Computer Glitch Keeps Inmate in Prison for Five Extra Months

A glitch in the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections (LMDC) computer system kept an inmate in prison for five extra months. Human error was also involved.

The inmate is Kentucky resident David Reyes. Authorities arrested Reyes in October 2015 on charges of sexual misconduct, unlawful imprisonment, and assault charges. Reyes pleaded guilty, and as part of the plea agreement, he received a prison sentence of nearly one year.

He was supposed to be released on September 25, 2016, but was only set free on February 13, 2017, after his family hired a lawyer who filed a grievance a judge.

Prison IT system has problems saving data

According to an LMDC internal audit obtained by Louisville news outlets [1, 2], a glitch prevented the IT system from saving Reyes’ new release date to the prison’s database.

Human error also played a part. Prison supervisors sent a notification that the system was not saving information correctly, telling data entry operators to double-check the data they entered in the system.

The LMDC report identifies the prison technician who entered Reyes’ data as Jacora Smith. Smith told auditors that she felt unprepared to do her job at that point after going through only seven weeks of training. Auditors said Smith failed to catch the data entry error in Reyes’ sentencing records.

Reyes did not go free after all

Reyes was not set free but handed over to US Immigration, Custom, and Enforcement Officers (ICE) officers, who issued a detainer in his name. Reyes was an illegal immigrant from Mexico.

The LMDC audit also noted Reyes’ claims that prison officials kept him incarcerated over his approved release date so they could hand him over to ICE officials.

The Reyes case is not the only one. Two former inmates filed lawsuits against LMDC alleging that they and probably hundreds of others were unlawfully being held by corrections officials, most likely due to the computer glitch and abuse.

LMDC bosses have appeared in front of Louisville city officials to explain the plethora of issues affecting the local jail system, including the problem of tardy inmate releases.

Human, Computer Errors Blamed After Man Held In Jail Extra 5 Months

FRANKFORT, Ky. (LEX 18) – A fire tore through the home of a couple in Frankfort, leaving them with nothing. After losing their two pets in the destruction, they’re hoping the community can help them get back on their feet. Angela Walters scrolls through her phone remembering the dog she received as a birthday present, nearly a decade ago. “I had eeyore eight years,” said Walters. After a fire burnt their entire camper down to pieces at still waters campground i…

Jony Ive says the iPhone X in 12 months ‘will be able to do things that it can’t now’

In a wide-ranging and intriguing interview with Wallpaper, Apple Chief Design Officer Jony Ive talked at length about the significance of the iPhone X, the company’s gargantuan new spaceship campus, and much more. Though Ive is primarily seen as the design guru who steers the ship when it comes to Apple’s line of consumer products, Ive actually played an interesting role in the overall design of Apple’s new headquarters as well. Apple executives are notoriously tight-lipped, and Ive in particular doesn’t tend to sit down for extensive interviews, a fact which makes his interview here all the more fascinating.

When asked about Apple’s new iPhone X, a device which represents the biggest redesign to the iPhone form factor in years, Ive explained that the device’s edgeless display is brimming with untapped potential. When asked if he misses traditional tactile inputs such as the old school iPhone home button or the even older clickwheel on the iPod, Ive effectively answers that the potential offered up by the iPhone X design easily outweighs any nostalgic feelings he may have for Apple’s iconic products of old.

“I’ve always been fascinated by these products that are more general purpose,” Ive explains. “What I think is remarkable about the iPhone X is that its functionality is so determined by software. And because of the fluid nature of software, this product is going to change and evolve. In 12 months’ time, this object will be able to do things that it can’t now. I think that is extraordinary. I think we will look back on it and see it as a very significant point in terms of the products we have been developing.”

Indeed, the clean slate that is the iPhone X display harkens back to the original iPhone introduction in 2007. There, Steve Jobs explained that removing the physical alpha-numeric keypad from the smartphone would allow the company to do things that no other company could do. In a similar vein, the edgeless display on the iPhone X will allow Apple and third-party developers to completely transform the user experience as we know it today.

“‘So while I’m completely seduced by the coherence and simplicity and how easy it is to comprehend something like the first iPod,” Ive added, “I am quite honestly more fascinated and intrigued by an object that changes its function profoundly and evolves. That is rare. That didn’t happen 50 years ago.”

Ive’s interview is well worth reading its entirety and can be found over here.

NetMarketShare: Windows 10 sees its slowest growth in months

16404_snail-graph-slow NetMarketShare: Windows 10 sees its slowest growth in months

The Windows 10 Fall Creators Update began its rollout last month, and according to AdDuplex it’s already on over 5 percent of systems running the new OS.

Windows 10’s growth has generally been quite slow since Microsoft pulled the plug on the official free upgrade path, and the latest figures from NetMarketShare show no change here. In fact, in October, Windows 10 saw its slowest growth in months.

SEE ALSO: Microsoft to end secret free Windows 10 upgrade offer by end of year

The analyst firm says that Windows 10 grew by just 0.17 percentage points last month and it now has 29.26 percent share. In September, Windows 10 grew by 0.66 percentage points, which was one of its better months.

Windows 7 also lost share in October, going from 47.21 percent to 46.63 percent, a decrease of 0.58 percentage points. Windows 10 will eventually overtake Windows 7, but the exact point that will happen is up for debate.

Windows 8.1 grew by 0.08 percentage points in October and is now on 5.97 percent. Windows 8 gained 0.16 percentage points to give it 1.40 percent. Combined, Windows 8.x added 0.24 percentage points, and has a total of 7.34 percent of the operating system market.

Down at the bottom is Windows XP with 6.47 percent. It also saw an increase in October, growing by 0.78 percentage points.

Photo credit: Igor Kovalchuk/Shutterstock




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