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Fake computer technicians targeting millennials in widespread scam …

Fake computer technicians targeting…






SPOKANE, Wash. – If you use a computer, the Better Business Bureau says it’s just a matter of time before you’re targeted by scammers posing as computer technicians. 

Those scammers claim that they need to fix a virus on your computer, when they are actually trying to get their hands on your sensitive information. 

The scam works through intrusive pop-ups and phone calls that trick you into believing your computer is in peril. They claim you have a virus infecting your computer, and possibly even a network of computers. Sometimes they even claim they will report you to authorities if you don’t get the issue fixed. 

While scams usually prey on the elderly, this one targets tech-trusting Millennials. 

“It’s actually younger people that are more likely to be the victim of a scam, especially those that have been dealing with devices pretty much their whole lives. They trust them,” said Kirsten Davis with Spokane’s Better Business Bureau. 

One Millennial who fell victim to the scam is 29-year-old Amy Sowell. 

“If I exited out of the pop up, I would lose all of my data on my hard drive. So I called the number which said they were a Microsoft partner and didn’t think twice about calling the number,” she said. 

When she did call the number, the person on the other end convinced her to pay $150 to have the issue fixed. That issue never even existed. 

“I had this gut feeling that something wasn’t quite right. I googled Microsoft partner and I found out they were a scam,” Sowell said. 

Davis says you should never call the number that is provided on a pop up. If you do, they’ll usually ask for remote access to your computer and could be installing viruses of their own to steal your identity. 

“You’re dealing with possibly bank accounts, sensitive information, your social security number so that they can commit identity theft and on top of that, now they’re going to ask you to probably pay for that process because they’re telling you they’re fixing your computer,” Davis said. 

Davis says if you do get a virus it’s best just to shut down your computer entirely. If you get a phone call from someone claiming a virus is infecting your computer, hang up immediately and report the number to the BBB’s website

In just the first nine months of this year, people have lost $21 million to tech support scams. Most of those calls are coming from India, with only a small portion coming from within the U.S. 

If you do get scammed, be sure to call your credit card company to inform them what happened and get the charge removed. 

 

Fake computer technicians targeting millennials in widespread scam

Fake computer technicians targeting…






SPOKANE, Wash. – If you use a computer, the Better Business Bureau says it’s just a matter of time before you’re targeted by scammers posing as computer technicians. 

Those scammers claim that they need to fix a virus on your computer, when they are actually trying to get their hands on your sensitive information. 

The scam works through intrusive pop-ups and phone calls that trick you into believing your computer is in peril. They claim you have a virus infecting your computer, and possibly even a network of computers. Sometimes they even claim they will report you to authorities if you don’t get the issue fixed. 

While scams usually prey on the elderly, this one targets tech-trusting Millennials. 

“It’s actually younger people that are more likely to be the victim of a scam, especially those that have been dealing with devices pretty much their whole lives. They trust them,” said Kirsten Davis with Spokane’s Better Business Bureau. 

One Millennial who fell victim to the scam is 29-year-old Amy Sowell. 

“If I exited out of the pop up, I would lose all of my data on my hard drive. So I called the number which said they were a Microsoft partner and didn’t think twice about calling the number,” she said. 

When she did call the number, the person on the other end convinced her to pay $150 to have the issue fixed. That issue never even existed. 

“I had this gut feeling that something wasn’t quite right. I googled Microsoft partner and I found out they were a scam,” Sowell said. 

Davis says you should never call the number that is provided on a pop up. If you do, they’ll usually ask for remote access to your computer and could be installing viruses of their own to steal your identity. 

“You’re dealing with possibly bank accounts, sensitive information, your social security number so that they can commit identity theft and on top of that, now they’re going to ask you to probably pay for that process because they’re telling you they’re fixing your computer,” Davis said. 

Davis says if you do get a virus it’s best just to shut down your computer entirely. If you get a phone call from someone claiming a virus is infecting your computer, hang up immediately and report the number to the BBB’s website

In just the first nine months of this year, people have lost $21 million to tech support scams. Most of those calls are coming from India, with only a small portion coming from within the U.S. 

If you do get scammed, be sure to call your credit card company to inform them what happened and get the charge removed. 

 

Apple releases new ads to sell millennials on the iPhone X

Still haven’t bought the iPhone X? Maybe these videos will convince you. 

Apple posted three new videos to its Youtube channel Monday, all of which advertise features of the iPhone X. 

These aren’t the first ads Apple has released for the iPhone X — the device was featured in Apple’s holiday ad for Airpods, and the company released several ads for the iPhone X, the iPhone 8/8 Plus, and the Apple Watch shortly after its keynote in September. Since then, it has periodically released new ads. 

The first ad highlights the convenience of FaceID as a security feature. We see the colorful shots of the iPhone X that we’ve seen in older commercials. Then, we’re shown a series of faces, and informed that our faces are “the most unforgettable, magical password ever created.” 

The second ad zooms in on Portrait Lighting, a highly anticipated feature of the TrueDepth camera leading up to the iPhone X’s release. We’re shown a photograph of a person (the same person whose photograph is featured in some of the pre-release commercials) in various lighting modes: Stage Light, Stage Light Mono, and Contour Light. 

This is the first ad Apple ad that we’ve seen highlight Portrait Lighting specifically. 

The third ad highlights FaceID again — this time, its adaptibility to change, addressing a concern many users raised before the iPhone X’s release. The ad takes us through various stages of a man’s beard, and implies that he can continue to open his iPhone X through each stage. 

The two FaceID ads are the latest in a series of ads Apple has released for the feature, beginning with the release of “Introducing FaceID” a few weeks ago. 

There’s one word that comes to mind to describe all three of these ads, and that’s “cool.” The music is a rolling hip-hop beat that one might hear in a night club. The shots are crisp, clean, and against dark backgrounds, and they feature young people looking smug and satisfied. In watching these ads, the iPhone X seems to have the same allure as an expensive night club: hip and super exclusive. 

It’s clear that Apple is trying to position the iPhone X as cool, flashy, and new for the youngest generation with purchasing power: millennials. 

As Apple gears up to release an even larger version of the iPhone X next year, expect to see more of these ads that are way too cool for you. 

WATCH: What does your iPhone color say about you?

Millennials’ struggle with health bills could push hospitals to change

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a1384_104884108-image1.530x298 Millennials' struggle with health bills could push hospitals to change

Jonathan and Nikia Reynolds are still deciding on a new health plan for 2018, weighing the pros and cons of a high-deductible insurance plan to try to keep their monthly premium lower.

“How it’s supposed to work, I kind of get all that stuff. … In practice, it’s usually less clear,” said Jonathan, a 34-year old Atlanta-based freelance video photographer.

At least, that’s how he felt after a late-night trip to the emergency room a couple of years ago resulted in months of confusing bills in the mail.

“I would get bills way after the fact, and it was never clear exactly what the bills were from, and how they related to what the insurance covered,” he said.

As the first generation to come of age under Obamacare, millennials are finding the new rules of consumer-driven health care tough to navigate.

More than half of millennials, 57 percent, say they have little to no understanding of how out-of pocket health costs such as co-pays, deductibles and co-insurance work, according to a new report from consumer credit firm TransUnion. By contrast, about 40 percent of baby boomers admit to limited knowledge about their benefits.

“Millennials came into the health-care market at a really volatile time, when cost-shifting was really happening … [and] deductibles have quadrupled,” said Jonathan Wiik, principal at TransUnion’s health-care unit.

For hospitals and other health providers, millennial patients — born from 1980 to 1994 — are proving to be a challenge when it comes to collecting payment for bills.

Nearly 3 in 4 millennials, 74 percent, failed to pay their medical expenses in full when first billed in 2016; that’s up from 64 percent in 2014, TransUnion’s survey said.

The vast majority cited limited savings for not paying, but nearly half of those surveyed say they’d be more apt to pay if they could get a cost estimate up front.

“They don’t pay their bills on time because they don’t understand them. That’s pretty typical of that generation — they’re not going to pay until somebody explains it to them,” said Wiik, who consults with hospitals on bill collection.

He says hospitals are starting to change the way they have traditionally billed, by trying to prepare patients for what their out of pocket costs will be ahead of treatment, and working out flexible payment plans to allow patients to pay over time.

But the hospitals have a long way to go.

“I don’t think any millennial pays their bills on paper,” Wiik said. “That’s how hospitals are billing right now. … It’s a big gap that the industry’s going to have to help fill.”

Jonathan Reynolds is hoping not to see any hospital bills in the mail any time soon.

“I know health care is complicated,” he said, but it’s high time for real “simplification of how deductibles and co-pays are explained, and just the process of billing itself.”

a1384_104884108-image1.530x298 Millennials' struggle with health bills could push hospitals to change



This Is Why Millennials Are Struggling to Get Health Insurance

Marguerite Moniot felt frustrated and flummoxed, despite the many hours she spent in front of the computer this year reading consumer reviews of health insurance plans offered on the individual market in Virginia. Moniot was preparing to buy a policy of her own, knowing she would age out of her parent’s plan when she turned 26 in October.

She asked her parents for help and advice. But they, too, ran into trouble trying to decipher which policy would work best for their daughter. The family had relied on her father’s employer-sponsored plan through his work as an architect for years, so no one had spent much time sifting through policies.

“Honestly, my parents were just as confused as I was,” said Moniot, a restaurant server in Roanoke.

In defeat, just before Thanksgiving, she went with her mother to meet a certified health insurance navigator, buying a policy that allowed her to keep her current doctors.

A new crop of young people like Moniot are falling off their parents’ insurance plans when they turn 26 — the age when the Affordable Care Act stipulates that children must leave family policies.

They were then expected to be able to shop relatively easily for their own insurance on Obamacare marketplaces. But with Trump administration revisions to the law and congressional bills injecting uncertainty into state insurance markets, that task of buying insurance for the first time this year is anything but simple.

The shortened sign-up period, which started Nov. 1, runs through Dec. 15. That window is half as long as last year’s, hampering those who wait until the last minute to obtain insurance.

Reminders and help are scarcer than before: The federal government cut marketing and outreach funds by $90 million, and federal funding to groups providing in-person assistance was whacked by 40 percent.

“I think it’s definitely going to be difficult. There’s just additional barriers with [less] in-person help, just fewer resources going around,” said Erin Hemlin, director of training and consumer education for Young Invincibles, an advocacy group for young adults.

Emily Curran, a research fellow at Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute, said those actions combined with the Trump administration’s vigorous criticism of the health law could further handicap the uphill battle to entice young people to enroll. As of Nov. 25, nearly 2.8 million people had enrolled through the federal marketplace, according to the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services. The data were not sorted by age.

“There’s already a barrier where young adults are having difficulty understanding what the value of insurance is,” she said. “Coming out … and saying prices are going up, choice is going down and this law is a mess doesn’t really get at the young adult population.”

Trouble attracting young ddults

Before the Affordable Care Act, young adults had the highest uninsured rate of any age group.

The ACA made coverage more affordable and accessible. It allowed states to expand Medicaid to cover single, childless adults. Tax credits to help pay for premiums made plans on the individual market more affordable for people whose incomes fell between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty level (between $12,060 and $48,240 for an individual). And young adults were allowed to stay on their parents’ plan until their 26th birthday.

In all, the uninsured rate dropped to roughly 15 percent among 19- to 34-year-olds in 2016. Still, young adults have not joined the individual market in the numbers as expected. About a quarter of marketplace customers in 2016 were ages 18-34, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. But that age group makes up about 40 percent of the exchanges’ potential market, according to researchers and federal officials.

If the Trump administration’s moves dampen enrollment, insurers could face additional challenges in attracting healthy adults to balance those with illnesses, who drive up costs.

“When you’re relatively healthy, it’s not something that you’re thinking about,” said Sandy Ahn, associate research professor at Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute.

But illness does not recognize age. Dominique Ridley, who turns 26 on Dec. 6, knows this all too well.

Ridley has asthma. She always carries an inhaler and sees a doctor when she feels her chest tighten. The student at Radford University in Virginia relies on her mother’s employer-sponsored plan for coverage.

Ridley started peppering her parents with questions about health insurance as soon as she started seeing ads for this year’s open enrollment.

“I don’t want to just go out there and apply for health insurance, and it be all kinds of wrong and I can’t afford it,” she said.

Her parents didn’t have the answers, but her mother linked up Ridley with a friend that runs a marketing company tailored to promoting the Affordable Care Act. Ridley then connected with a broker who signed her up for a silver plan that will cost her less than $4 per month, after receiving a premium subsidy of more than $500 a month.

“If you don’t have health insurance, you don’t have anything,” Ridley said.

A digital campaign

The Obama administration relied in part on partnerships to attract young enrollees to sign up. Last year, it collaborated with national organizations like Planned Parenthood Federation of America and Young Invincibles on a social media campaign called #HealthyAdulting. Emails, according to Joshua Peck, former chief marketing officer for healthcare.gov, were particularly effective for recruitment.

The Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services, which oversees the marketplaces, said it will focus this year’s resources on “digital media, email and text messages.”

Hemlin said the government has not asked Young Invincibles to assist in marketing. Her group will use its own resources to pay for targeted ads on social media to reach the target demographic, she said.

“But obviously we can’t make up for $90 million in advertising” that’s been cut, said Hemlin.

One factor that might compensate is that 20-somethings are facile at shopping online, said Jill Hanken, director of Enroll! Virginia, a statewide navigator program.

“Our job is to make sure they understand to look at provider networks and drug formularies if they have health concerns. But they’re able to do the mechanics of enrollment on their own very often.”

James Rowley, a 26-year-old entrepreneur from Fairfax, Va., is among those who signed up without help. He started his own company two years ago while covered under his father’s health plan. When he turned 26, he signed up for health insurance on his own through a special enrollment period this year. When general enrollment opened, he once again picked a plan.

“I might not 100 percent need it now, but there will come a time where health insurance is important,” said Rowley.

This story was produced in collaboration with Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation. Carmen Heredia Rodriguez is a Kaiser Health News reporter.

This Is Why Millennials Are Struggling to Get Health Insurance

Marguerite Moniot felt frustrated and flummoxed, despite the many hours she spent in front of the computer this year reading consumer reviews of health insurance plans offered on the individual market in Virginia. Moniot was preparing to buy a policy of her own, knowing she would age out of her parent’s plan when she turned 26 in October.

She asked her parents for help and advice. But they, too, ran into trouble trying to decipher which policy would work best for their daughter. The family had relied on her father’s employer-sponsored plan through his work as an architect for years, so no one had spent much time sifting through policies.

“Honestly, my parents were just as confused as I was,” said Moniot, a restaurant server in Roanoke.

In defeat, just before Thanksgiving, she went with her mother to meet a certified health insurance navigator, buying a policy that allowed her to keep her current doctors.

A new crop of young people like Moniot are falling off their parents’ insurance plans when they turn 26 — the age when the Affordable Care Act stipulates that children must leave family policies.

They were then expected to be able to shop relatively easily for their own insurance on Obamacare marketplaces. But with Trump administration revisions to the law and congressional bills injecting uncertainty into state insurance markets, that task of buying insurance for the first time this year is anything but simple.

The shortened sign-up period, which started Nov. 1, runs through Dec. 15. That window is half as long as last year’s, hampering those who wait until the last minute to obtain insurance.

Reminders and help are scarcer than before: The federal government cut marketing and outreach funds by $90 million, and federal funding to groups providing in-person assistance was whacked by 40 percent.

“I think it’s definitely going to be difficult. There’s just additional barriers with [less] in-person help, just fewer resources going around,” said Erin Hemlin, director of training and consumer education for Young Invincibles, an advocacy group for young adults.

Emily Curran, a research fellow at Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute, said those actions combined with the Trump administration’s vigorous criticism of the health law could further handicap the uphill battle to entice young people to enroll. As of Nov. 25, nearly 2.8 million people had enrolled through the federal marketplace, according to the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services. The data were not sorted by age.

“There’s already a barrier where young adults are having difficulty understanding what the value of insurance is,” she said. “Coming out … and saying prices are going up, choice is going down and this law is a mess doesn’t really get at the young adult population.”

Trouble attracting young ddults

Before the Affordable Care Act, young adults had the highest uninsured rate of any age group.

The ACA made coverage more affordable and accessible. It allowed states to expand Medicaid to cover single, childless adults. Tax credits to help pay for premiums made plans on the individual market more affordable for people whose incomes fell between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty level (between $12,060 and $48,240 for an individual). And young adults were allowed to stay on their parents’ plan until their 26th birthday.

In all, the uninsured rate dropped to roughly 15 percent among 19- to 34-year-olds in 2016. Still, young adults have not joined the individual market in the numbers as expected. About a quarter of marketplace customers in 2016 were ages 18-34, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. But that age group makes up about 40 percent of the exchanges’ potential market, according to researchers and federal officials.

If the Trump administration’s moves dampen enrollment, insurers could face additional challenges in attracting healthy adults to balance those with illnesses, who drive up costs.

“When you’re relatively healthy, it’s not something that you’re thinking about,” said Sandy Ahn, associate research professor at Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute.

But illness does not recognize age. Dominique Ridley, who turns 26 on Dec. 6, knows this all too well.

Ridley has asthma. She always carries an inhaler and sees a doctor when she feels her chest tighten. The student at Radford University in Virginia relies on her mother’s employer-sponsored plan for coverage.

Ridley started peppering her parents with questions about health insurance as soon as she started seeing ads for this year’s open enrollment.

“I don’t want to just go out there and apply for health insurance, and it be all kinds of wrong and I can’t afford it,” she said.

Her parents didn’t have the answers, but her mother linked up Ridley with a friend that runs a marketing company tailored to promoting the Affordable Care Act. Ridley then connected with a broker who signed her up for a silver plan that will cost her less than $4 per month, after receiving a premium subsidy of more than $500 a month.

“If you don’t have health insurance, you don’t have anything,” Ridley said.

A digital campaign

The Obama administration relied in part on partnerships to attract young enrollees to sign up. Last year, it collaborated with national organizations like Planned Parenthood Federation of America and Young Invincibles on a social media campaign called #HealthyAdulting. Emails, according to Joshua Peck, former chief marketing officer for healthcare.gov, were particularly effective for recruitment.

The Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services, which oversees the marketplaces, said it will focus this year’s resources on “digital media, email and text messages.”

Hemlin said the government has not asked Young Invincibles to assist in marketing. Her group will use its own resources to pay for targeted ads on social media to reach the target demographic, she said.

“But obviously we can’t make up for $90 million in advertising” that’s been cut, said Hemlin.

One factor that might compensate is that 20-somethings are facile at shopping online, said Jill Hanken, director of Enroll! Virginia, a statewide navigator program.

“Our job is to make sure they understand to look at provider networks and drug formularies if they have health concerns. But they’re able to do the mechanics of enrollment on their own very often.”

James Rowley, a 26-year-old entrepreneur from Fairfax, Va., is among those who signed up without help. He started his own company two years ago while covered under his father’s health plan. When he turned 26, he signed up for health insurance on his own through a special enrollment period this year. When general enrollment opened, he once again picked a plan.

“I might not 100 percent need it now, but there will come a time where health insurance is important,” said Rowley.

This story was produced in collaboration with Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation. Carmen Heredia Rodriguez is a Kaiser Health News reporter.

This Is Why Millennials Are Struggling to Get Health Insurance

Marguerite Moniot felt frustrated and flummoxed, despite the many hours she spent in front of the computer this year reading consumer reviews of health insurance plans offered on the individual market in Virginia. Moniot was preparing to buy a policy of her own, knowing she would age out of her parent’s plan when she turned 26 in October.

She asked her parents for help and advice. But they, too, ran into trouble trying to decipher which policy would work best for their daughter. The family had relied on her father’s employer-sponsored plan through his work as an architect for years, so no one had spent much time sifting through policies.

“Honestly, my parents were just as confused as I was,” said Moniot, a restaurant server in Roanoke.

In defeat, just before Thanksgiving, she went with her mother to meet a certified health insurance navigator, buying a policy that allowed her to keep her current doctors.

A new crop of young people like Moniot are falling off their parents’ insurance plans when they turn 26 — the age when the Affordable Care Act stipulates that children must leave family policies.

They were then expected to be able to shop relatively easily for their own insurance on Obamacare marketplaces. But with Trump administration revisions to the law and congressional bills injecting uncertainty into state insurance markets, that task of buying insurance for the first time this year is anything but simple.

The shortened sign-up period, which started Nov. 1, runs through Dec. 15. That window is half as long as last year’s, hampering those who wait until the last minute to obtain insurance.

Reminders and help are scarcer than before: The federal government cut marketing and outreach funds by $90 million, and federal funding to groups providing in-person assistance was whacked by 40 percent.

“I think it’s definitely going to be difficult. There’s just additional barriers with [less] in-person help, just fewer resources going around,” said Erin Hemlin, director of training and consumer education for Young Invincibles, an advocacy group for young adults.

Emily Curran, a research fellow at Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute, said those actions combined with the Trump administration’s vigorous criticism of the health law could further handicap the uphill battle to entice young people to enroll. As of Nov. 25, nearly 2.8 million people had enrolled through the federal marketplace, according to the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services. The data were not sorted by age.

“There’s already a barrier where young adults are having difficulty understanding what the value of insurance is,” she said. “Coming out … and saying prices are going up, choice is going down and this law is a mess doesn’t really get at the young adult population.”

Trouble attracting young ddults

Before the Affordable Care Act, young adults had the highest uninsured rate of any age group.

The ACA made coverage more affordable and accessible. It allowed states to expand Medicaid to cover single, childless adults. Tax credits to help pay for premiums made plans on the individual market more affordable for people whose incomes fell between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty level (between $12,060 and $48,240 for an individual). And young adults were allowed to stay on their parents’ plan until their 26th birthday.

In all, the uninsured rate dropped to roughly 15 percent among 19- to 34-year-olds in 2016. Still, young adults have not joined the individual market in the numbers as expected. About a quarter of marketplace customers in 2016 were ages 18-34, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. But that age group makes up about 40 percent of the exchanges’ potential market, according to researchers and federal officials.

If the Trump administration’s moves dampen enrollment, insurers could face additional challenges in attracting healthy adults to balance those with illnesses, who drive up costs.

“When you’re relatively healthy, it’s not something that you’re thinking about,” said Sandy Ahn, associate research professor at Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute.

But illness does not recognize age. Dominique Ridley, who turns 26 on Dec. 6, knows this all too well.

Ridley has asthma. She always carries an inhaler and sees a doctor when she feels her chest tighten. The student at Radford University in Virginia relies on her mother’s employer-sponsored plan for coverage.

Ridley started peppering her parents with questions about health insurance as soon as she started seeing ads for this year’s open enrollment.

“I don’t want to just go out there and apply for health insurance, and it be all kinds of wrong and I can’t afford it,” she said.

Her parents didn’t have the answers, but her mother linked up Ridley with a friend that runs a marketing company tailored to promoting the Affordable Care Act. Ridley then connected with a broker who signed her up for a silver plan that will cost her less than $4 per month, after receiving a premium subsidy of more than $500 a month.

“If you don’t have health insurance, you don’t have anything,” Ridley said.

A digital campaign

The Obama administration relied in part on partnerships to attract young enrollees to sign up. Last year, it collaborated with national organizations like Planned Parenthood Federation of America and Young Invincibles on a social media campaign called #HealthyAdulting. Emails, according to Joshua Peck, former chief marketing officer for healthcare.gov, were particularly effective for recruitment.

The Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services, which oversees the marketplaces, said it will focus this year’s resources on “digital media, email and text messages.”

Hemlin said the government has not asked Young Invincibles to assist in marketing. Her group will use its own resources to pay for targeted ads on social media to reach the target demographic, she said.

“But obviously we can’t make up for $90 million in advertising” that’s been cut, said Hemlin.

One factor that might compensate is that 20-somethings are facile at shopping online, said Jill Hanken, director of Enroll! Virginia, a statewide navigator program.

“Our job is to make sure they understand to look at provider networks and drug formularies if they have health concerns. But they’re able to do the mechanics of enrollment on their own very often.”

James Rowley, a 26-year-old entrepreneur from Fairfax, Va., is among those who signed up without help. He started his own company two years ago while covered under his father’s health plan. When he turned 26, he signed up for health insurance on his own through a special enrollment period this year. When general enrollment opened, he once again picked a plan.

“I might not 100 percent need it now, but there will come a time where health insurance is important,” said Rowley.

This story was produced in collaboration with Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation. Carmen Heredia Rodriguez is a Kaiser Health News reporter.

Millennials would choose this job perk even over health insurance

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12 Hours Ago

09773_104761714-NUP_174909_0372_1.1910x1000 Millennials would choose this job perk even over health insurance

Forget free food, forget foosball, forget an office gym. Millennials agree that there’s really just one thing companies could offer to both satisfy and retain their young employees and also attract new talent: Help paying back their student loans.

Young workers are so eager for it that some would even prefer it to health insurance.

A recent survey of millennials, both in the workforce and in school, found that 85 percent would accept one job offer over another if it included help paying back their student loans. 36 percent would stay more than a year longer for it.

09773_104761714-NUP_174909_0372_1.1910x1000 Millennials would choose this job perk even over health insurance

And it’s no wonder. More than 44 million Americans have taken out student loans. The debt totals $1.4 trillion.

The average cost for one year at a public university is at $20,000 for in-state students, and for out-of-state students it’s $34,000.

The survey notes “the average respondent prefers student loan repayment nearly [two times] more than 401(k) contribution, [seven times] more than food, [11 times] more than gym membership and [12 times] more than enhancement to the workplace environment.”

09773_104761714-NUP_174909_0372_1.1910x1000 Millennials would choose this job perk even over health insurance

27 percent of respondents would prefer loan repayment 18 times more than 401(k) contributions and 23 times more than health insurance contributions. It noted these individuals were more likely to be female and minorities.

In most cases, students seeking loan assistance must complete a predetermined amount of coursework, maintain a minimum grade-point average and have been employed at their respective employer for a qualifying amount of time to be eligible.

Once requirements are met, some companies, like Starbucks, cover the full cost of college tuition for employees. These other companies will help you pay for school, too.

Like this story? Like CNBC Make It on Facebook!

Don’t miss: These companies will help you pay to go to college



09773_104761714-NUP_174909_0372_1.1910x1000 Millennials would choose this job perk even over health insurance


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