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Run Your Favorite Windows Apps and Games Directly on Your Mac or Linux OS

 

It’s almost 2018, and for some reason there still exists an obnoxious barrier between Windows, Mac, and Linux operating systems when it comes to running apps and playing games.

CrossOver 17 for Linux was designed to break that tedious barrier down, by allowing you to run your favorite Windows apps and games directly on your Mac or Linux computer, and it’s available for over 50% off at just $19.

Consider how much time and money you’ll save by not having to buy a separate Windows license, reboot your computer, or use a virtual machine every time you just want to enjoy some cross-platform gaming or software on your Mac or Linux machine.

CrossOver 17 for Linux lets you run practically any Windows program quickly and easily without having to worry about separate installations or hauling around another computer. You’ll be able to operate your Windows software at native speed (without any performance barriers) and launch your Windows programs directly from the Dock.

Don’t be weighed down by operating system limitations. CrossOver 17 for Linux brings your operating systems together with a single click, and it’s on sale for just $19.

Linux Foundation Continues to Emphasize Diversity and Inclusiveness at Events

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With Ataribox, the legend returns — powered by Linux

93b83_atari-ataribox-gaming-console-linux-pc-retro With Ataribox, the legend returns -- powered by Linux

Ataribox

Have you played Atari today? Once a jingle’s catchphrase as well as a legitimate query, a resurrected version of the brand is hoping you’ll soon be asking that question again with the forthcoming Ataribox.

Available to pre-order on Thursday for a special price via an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, the Ataribox is shaping up to be an amalgam of retro gaming console and living room PC. Details are mostly sketchy at this point, but we do know that it will be powered by some variant of Linux OS and will include over 100 Atari classic games pre-installed.

Unfortunately for retro gaming fans, the full list of games isn’t known yet, nor do we know other key information like the Ataribox’s shipping date or its pricing (though VentureBeat reports it will sell somewhere between $250 and $300). Atari Interactive has been leaking dribs and drabs through social media, such as the inclusion of titles like Asteroids, Missile Command, and Breakout.

The company has updated the design for its console while retaining touches from the vintage 2600 — in addition to an option with black trim and red glowing Atari logo, you can get the Ataribox with the faux wood trim of the original. The joystick also resembles the 2600’s, but with a revamped look that’s more 2017 than 1980.

But by choosing to build the Ataribox as a Linux-running mini PC, Atari is giving itself the opportunity to stay current with new games, unlike many of the plug-and-play retro consoles. Though we don’t know the precise configuration, we’ve been promised a system with an AMD processor customized for the console and the ability to play mid-range games.

Will the Ataribox be a hit like Nintendo’s SNES Classic mini was? Or will it fizzle out like many other living room PCs that came before it, despite the retro trappings? The price will clearly be an issue — even if it’s technically a PC, it could winding up costing as much as some versions of the Xbox One or PlayStation 4, not to mention that many potential buyers would only want it to play the old Atari games. We’ll get a better idea starting on December 14, as the Indiegogo campaign kicks off and Atari will see how just many people will rush to open their wallets to grab an Ataribox.

PREVIOUS AND RELATED COVERAGE

Why Nintendo killed the Classic that consumers loved

Popular yet nearly unattainable since its launch, the NES Classic was too successful in sating the hunger of those nostalgic for a vintage Nintendo experience. Its sequel will better ensure Nintendo gets a piece of higher hardware prices and more software opportunities.

As SNES Classic mini sells out, rivals step in

Nintendo may have learned lessons from the NES Classic mini, but it still can’t fulfill demand for its latest throwback. That’s provided opportunities for other serving the classic videogames market.

A retro computer brings touch typing to a smartphone

A scion of UK’s Psion, the Gemini folds a modern smartphone’s internals and display onto the best keyboard ever designed for a pocket device. But it won’t replace a smartphone for many.

Can you name this vintage tech?

From early calculators to WWII cryptography machines, if you can name this old hardware, software and storage media, you really know your stuff.

How to squeeze the most out of Linux file compression

If you have any doubt about the many commands and options available on Linux systems for file compression, you might want to take a look at the output of the apropos compress command. Chances are you’ll be surprised by the many commands that you can use for compressing and decompressing files, as well as for comparing compressed files, examining and searching through the content of compressed files, and even changing a compressed file from one format to another (i.e., .z format to .gz format).

You’re likely to see all of these entries just for the suite of bzip2 compression commands. Add in zip, gzip, and xz, and you’ve got a lot of interesting options.

$ apropos compress | grep ^bz
bzcat (1)            - decompresses files to stdout
bzcmp (1)            - compare bzip2 compressed files
bzdiff (1)           - compare bzip2 compressed files
bzegrep (1)          - search possibly bzip2 compressed
                       files for a regular expression
bzexe (1)            - compress executable files in place
bzfgrep (1)          - search possibly bzip2 compressed
                       files for a regular expression
bzgrep (1)           - search possibly bzip2 compressed
                       files for a regular expression
bzip2 (1)            - a block-sorting file compressor,
                       v1.0.6
bzless (1)           - file perusal filter for crt viewing
                       of bzip2 compressed text
bzmore (1)           - file perusal filter for crt viewing
                       of bzip2 compressed text

On my Ubuntu system, over 60 commands were listed in response to the apropos compress command.

Compression algorithms

Compression is not a one-size-fits-all issue. Some compression tools are “lossy,” such as those used to reduce the size of mp3 files while allowing listeners to have what is nearly the same musical experience as listening to the originals. But algorithms used on the Linux command line to compress or archive user files have to be able to reproduce the original content exactly. In other words, they have to be lossless.

How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

If you work with Linux, or you just want to test drive the OS, you can use Hyper-V to create a virtual machine with the distro you like alongside Windows 10.

Although it’s now possible to run a number of Linux distros natively on Windows 10, these environments can be somewhat limited in features and tools you can use. Also, you can only pick from three distros, including Ubuntu, SUSE Linux Enterprise, and OpenSUSE Leap, and you’re stuck with the command-line interface, which means that you can’t run any of the graphical experiences (e.g., GNOME, KDE, XFCE) or Linux-based graphical applications.

Of course, you can always install your favorite Linux distro on a second machine, but if you don’t have one, it’s still possible to run a full-blown version of Linux using a virtual machine (VM).

If you’re running Windows 10, you can enable Hyper-V on your device to create a VM to install your preferred distro whether you’re a developer or an enthusiast who just wants to know what’s the Linux fuzz all about.

In this Windows 10 guide, we’ll walk you through the steps to install most Linux distributions on virtual machines using Microsoft’s Hyper-V virtualization feature.

  • Guide requirements
  • How to enable Hyper-V on Windows 10
  • How to create a virtual machine using Hyper-V
  • How to install Ubuntu Linux using Hyper-V on Windows 10

Guide requirements

To run a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10, you’ll need the following:

  • A computer with support for Hyper-V.
  • An ISO file to install your preferred Linux distribution.

In this guide, we’ll be using Ubuntu version 17.10, which you can download from the official Ubuntu website. However, it’s possible to install version 16.04, which might be a more stable version of the open source project, and you can also install other distros, including:

  • CentOS and Red Hat Enterprise Linux.
  • Debian.
  • SUSE.
  • Oracle Linux.
  • FreeBSD.

How to enable Hyper-V on Windows 10

Hyper-V is a virtualization technology from Microsoft available on Windows 10 Pro, Enterprise, and Education, and it allows you to create one or multiple virtual machines to install and run different OSes on the same physical hardware.

Verifying Hyper-V support

Although Hyper-V is part of Windows 10, there is a minimum hardware requirement a computer must meet to enable the feature.

  • 64-bit CPU with Second Level Address Translation (SLAT).
  • Processor must support VM Monitor Mode Extension (VT-c on Intel chips).
  • 4GB of memory at a minimum.

In addition, you have to make sure the Virtualization Technology and Hardware Enforced Data Execution Prevention options are enabled on your system BIOS.

You can quickly verify your computer has the required support for Hyper-V using Systeminfo:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Command Prompt and click the top result.
  3. Type the following command and press Enter:

    systeminfo.exe

  4. Under Hyper-V Requirements, if the result reads Yes, then you can run Hyper-V.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

If the command displays No under Hyper-V Requirements, then your hardware doesn’t support this feature, or you need to make sure to enable it manually.

Enabling Hyper-V

Use the following steps to enable Hyper-V on Windows 10:

  1. Open Control Panel.
  2. Click on Programs.
  3. Click on Turn Windows features on or off.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  4. Check the Hyper-V option making sure: Hyper-V Management Tools and Hyper-V Platform are also selected.
  5. Click OK to begin the process.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  6. After the installation completes, click Restart now to apply the changes.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

How to create a virtual machine using Hyper-V

Once you’ve completed adding the virtualization layer to Windows 10, you’ll need to create a virtual machine for the Linux distribution you want to use.

However, before you do that, you must create a virtual switch to allow the VM to connect to the internet.

Creating a virtual switch

Use the following steps to configure a virtual switch on Hyper-V:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Hyper-V Manager and click the top result.
  3. Click on the Action menu.
  4. Select New and click on Virtual Switch Manager.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  5. On the left pane, select New virtual network switch.
  6. On the right, select External.
  7. Click the Create Virtual Switch button.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  8. Enter a new descriptive name for the switch (e.g., MyVirtualSwitch).
  9. Under connection type, make sure your network adapter is select on External network.
  10. Click Apply.
  11. Click OK.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

Creating a virtual machine

After creating the virtual switch, you can proceed to create a new virtual machine:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Hyper-V Manager and click the top result.
  3. Click on the Action menu.
  4. Select New and click on Virtual Machine.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  5. Click the Next button.
  6. Enter a descriptive name for your virtual machine (e.g., vm-ubuntu).

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  7. Use the default location to store your virtual machine, or check the Store the virtual machine in a different location option to select a different path.
  8. Click Next to continue.
  9. You can leave the default Generation 1 option selected. Or you can select Generation 2 if you want a UEFI-based firmware.
  10. Click Next.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  11. Select the amount of RAM to allocate for your virtual machine. In the case of Ubuntu, you need a minimum of 2GB of memory.

    You can allocate as much memory as you want, but this setting will always depend on the physical memory available on your computer.

  12. Click Next.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  13. Use the drop-down menu to select the virtual switch you created earlier.
  14. Click Next.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  15. You can leave all the default settings to create a virtual hard drive, but under Size make sure to allocated at least 25GB of storage, which is the minimum required to run Ubuntu.
  16. Click Next to continue.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  17. On Installation options, select the Install an operating system from a bootable CD/DVD-ROM option.
  18. Select the Image file (.iso) option.
  19. Select the path for the ISO file with the Ubuntu installation files.
  20. Click Next.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  21. Click Finish.

How to install Ubuntu Linux using Hyper-V on Windows 10

The last step is to start the virtual machine and install the Linux distribution you want to use.

  1. On Hyper-V Manager, under Virtual Machine, right-click the newly created device, and select Connect.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  2. Click the Start (power) button.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  3. Select your language.
  4. Click the Install Ubuntu button.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  5. Check the Install third-party software for graphics and Wi-Fi hardware, Flash, MP3 and other media option.
  6. Click Continue.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  7. Select the Something else option.
  8. Click Continue.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  9. Double-click the /dev/sda drive.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  10. Click Continue.
  11. Double-click free space.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  12. Under “Use as,” use the drop-down menu and select Swap area to create a swap partition.
  13. Under “Size,” select the amount of space for the swap partition, which should be about 2x of the amount of RAM allocated for the virtual machine.
  14. Click OK.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  15. Double-click free space again.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  16. Select the amount of space to allocate for the installation.
  17. Under “Mount point,” use the drop-down menu and select root /.
  18. Click OK.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  19. Select the ext4 partition from the list.
  20. Click the Install Now button.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  21. Click Continue to install Ubuntu.
  22. Select your time zone.
  23. Click Continue.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  24. Select the keyboard layout.
  25. Click Continue.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  26. Create a user account with your information.
  27. Click Continue.

    41ec0_windows-10-hyperv-ubuntu How to create a Linux virtual machine on Windows 10 using Hyper-V

  28. Restart the virtual machine to finish the setup.

    Quick Tip: If during the final restart process, you get a message to remove the installation and press Enter, but hitting the key won’t restart the VM, just click the Turn off button and then turn it back on again.

After completing the steps, you can just turn on the VM and start using Ubuntu Linux alongside Windows 10.

While we’re focusing this guide setting up Ubuntu, you can also refer to these instructions to run other distributions of Linux.

More Windows 10 resources

For more helpful articles, coverage, and answers to common questions about Windows 10, visit the following resources:

With Ataribox, the Legend Returns — Powered by Linux

faaeb_atari-ataribox-gaming-console-linux-pc-retro With Ataribox, the Legend Returns -- Powered by Linux

Ataribox

Have you played Atari today? Once a jingle’s catchphrase as well as a legitimate query, a resurrected version of the brand is hoping you’ll soon be asking that question again with the forthcoming Ataribox.

Available to pre-order on Thursday for a special price via an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, the Ataribox is shaping up to be an amalgam of retro gaming console and living room PC. Details are mostly sketchy at this point, but we do know that it will be powered by some variant of Linux OS and will include over 100 Atari classic games pre-installed.

Unfortunately, for retro gaming fans, the full list of games isn’t known yet, nor do we know other key information like the Ataribox’s shipping date or its pricing (though VentureBeat reports it will sell somewhere between $250 and $300). Atari Interactive has been leaking dribs and drabs through social media, such as the inclusion of titles like Asteroids, Missile Command, and Breakout.

The company has updated the design for its console while retaining touches from the vintage 2600 — in addition to an option with black trim and red glowing Atari logo, you can get the Ataribox with the faux wood trim of the original. The joystick also resembles the 2600’s, but with a revamped look that’s more 2017 than 1980.

But by choosing to build the Ataribox as a Linux-running mini PC, Atari is giving itself the opportunity to stay current with new games, unlike many of the plug-and-play retro consoles. Though we don’t know the precise configuration, we’ve been promised a system with a AMD processor customized for the console and the ability to play mid-range games.

Will the Ataribox be a hit like Nintendo’s SNES Classic mini was? Or will it fizzle out like many other living room PCs that came before it, despite the retro trappings? The price will clearly be an issue — even if it’s technically a PC, it could winding up costing as much as some versions of the Xbox One or PlayStation 4, not to mention that many potential buyers would only want it to play the old Atari games. We’ll get a better idea starting on December 14, as the Indiegogo campaign kicks off and Atari will see how just many people will rush to open their wallets to grab an Ataribox.

Mint 18.3: The best Linux desktop takes big steps forward

82b39_59889ea0e4b0515f57c1f717-1280x7201aug082017115810poster Mint 18.3: The best Linux desktop takes big steps forward


82b39_59889ea0e4b0515f57c1f717-1280x7201aug082017115810poster Mint 18.3: The best Linux desktop takes big steps forward


The rising tension between IoT and ERP systems

The Internet of Things is the new frontier. However, generations of ERP systems were not designed to handle global networks of sensors and devices.

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I run many operating systems every day, from macOS, to Windows 7 and 10, to more Linux desktop distributions than you can shake a stick at. And, once more, as a power-user’s power user, I’ve found the latest version of Linux Mint to be the best of the best.

Why? Let’s start with the basics. MacOS has been shown to have the worst bug I’ve ever seen in an operating system: The macOS High Sierra security hole that lets anyone get full administrative control. Windows, old and new, continues to have multiple security bugs every lousy month. Linux? Sure, it has security problems. How many of these bugs have had serious desktop impacts? Let me see now. None. Yes, that would be zero.

Oh, and by the way, in using Linux desktops for over 25 years now, I have needed to use an anti-virus program because, for all practical purposes, there are no Linux viruses. Yes, I know you’ve read stories saying they exist. And, they do, but you must actively try to infect your system to get them.

Then, there’s ease of use. Despite ancient FUD, Linux, especially the new Linux Mint 18.3 but really all current Linux desktops, are simple to use. Mint’s Cinnamon interface uses a classic Windows, Icons, Menu, and Pointer (WIMP) interface. If you’ve ever used Windows XP, you’ll feel completely at home.

Want to install an application? Sure you can use shell-based tools such as apt-get on Debian-based Linux distributions or yum on the Red Hat family of operating systems. But, ordinary desktop users need not bother with these. Instead, they can just use an app store approach such as Mint’s Software Manager. You search for your app, you point, you click. Not very hard is it?

Want to update your system to a new one? With Macs and Windows, that can take hours. With Mint, it took me less than an hour and most of that was waiting for the download to complete. Compare that with Windows, where as a friend recently pointed out, just updating a Logitech mouse driver took about 10 minutes.

Linux desktops are also fast even on older hardware. High Sierra runs as fast as pouring maple syrup on a cold day on my maxed out Mac Mini with its 3.0GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 CPU and 16GB of RAM. Windows 10, on my Dell XPS 8700 with a 3.6 GHz Intel Core i7-4790 processor and 16GBs of memory, runs fast enough to be useful, but fast is not the word I’d use to describe its performance. Mint 18.3, on my 2011 Dell XPS 8300 with its 3.4GHz quad-core Intel Core i7 processor and 8GBs of RAM, charges along like a champ. I wouldn’t waste my time trying to run Windows or macOS on a six-year-old box.

But enough about Linux vs. the others, let’s talk about Linux Mint 18.3.

82b39_59889ea0e4b0515f57c1f717-1280x7201aug082017115810poster Mint 18.3: The best Linux desktop takes big steps forward

Linux Mint 18.3 is easy to use and works like a charm


sjvn

If you’ve never installed Mint before, you can download its ISO files from the Mint Downloads. There are still both 64-bit and 32-bit versions for the Cinnamon desktop, but unless you’re running a really old system, just down the 64-bit version. Then burn the ISO image to a DVD using a tool such as ImgBurn. Or, you can put it on a bootable USB stick with a program like Rufus.

Then, boot your computer using the DVD or stick and make sure Mint works with your computer. If it does — and I’ve never met a PC it wouldn’t work on — you can then install it. For further details see my How to install Linux Mint on your Windows PC article.

The one possible problem is if your PC has a newer NVIDIA graphics. In that case, for a better display, use NVIDIA’s own drivers rather than the open-source ones provided by NVIDIA. To do this, take the following steps:

  • Run the Driver Manager
  • Choose the NVIDIA drivers and wait for them to be installed
  • Reboot the computer

If you’re already running an earlier version of Mint 18, click on the Refresh button in Update Manager to check for any new version of mintupdate and mint-upgrade-info. If there are updates for these packages, apply them. Then, refresh the packages and install any updated package. Finally, launch the System Upgrade by clicking on “Edit-Upgrade to Linux Mint 18.3 Sylvia”. Within an hour, you’ll be running the latest, freshest version of Mint.

This version is based on Ubuntu 16.04.3. Like 16.04, it’s a long-term support version. Mint developers will support it until April 2021. This distribution is based on the 4.10 Linux kernel.

82b39_59889ea0e4b0515f57c1f717-1280x7201aug082017115810poster Mint 18.3: The best Linux desktop takes big steps forward

Anyone who tells you it’s hard to install programs on Linux doesn’t know what they’re talking about.


sjvn

This version features a revamped Software Manager. It’s now more attractive than ever, much — three times — faster, and, more importantly, it makes it easier than ever to find the programs you’re searching for.

The Software Manager also supports Flatpak. This is a Red Hat software installation system. It enables you to install bleeding-edge applications even if their dependencies aren’t included with Linux Mint.

Linux Mint 18.3 comes with Flatpak installed by default and the new Software Manager fully supports it. This lets you install such programs as GNOME Games 3.26, even though these games couldn’t ordinarily run in Linux Mint since it requires the GTK 3.18 Linux toolkit.

Another new addition, which I really like, is the almost completely rewritten default BackUp program. It, as Mint points out, “is now dedicated to making a backup of your home directory, nothing less and nothing more”. Once restoring, files are placed back where they were before with their original permissions and timestamps.

It also runs in user mode so you no longer need to enter your password. The steps required to perform a backup or to restore data are much simpler. Tour configuration choices are remembered so you can repeat backups often without the need to repeat your setup instructions over and over again. This makes backing up and restoring your most important personal files easier than ever.

What about your system files and installed software? No problem! Timeshift, which makes system snapshots easy, saves everything on your system, except your personal data. It works hand-in-glove with the Linux Mint Backup Tool.

If something goes awry with your desktop, the new System Reports makes looking at your crash reports much easier. This program can also be used to get a quick look into the state of your system and software.

Mint 18.3 also comes with the newest version of Cinnamon: Cinammon 3.6. This comes with many small improvements and one truly significant one. The important new feature is it now supports GNOME Online Accounts. For me, the real win is that you can now access Google Drive and the personal cloud program OwnCloud resources directly from the Cinnamon Nemo file manager.

This lets Mint users — like macOS with iCloud and Windows users with Microsoft OneDrive — work directly with Google and OwnCloud files from Nemo. Google has promised it would integrate Google Drive with Linux since Drive rolled out in 2012. Google never kept that promise. Today, if you want to work directly with Google Drive from Linux, you need to purchase InSync.

GNOME Online Accounts looks like it could replace InSync. It doesn’t. Yes, it gives you access to Google Drive files from your desktop, but it does it by mounting Google Drive in your file system. That means every time you access it from your desktop you have to connect with it over the internet. Even with my 120MB internet connection, that can be painfully slow. What’s really needed is a local copy of your Google Drive.

Still, it gives you cloud drive access directly from the file manager and that’s still handy. It also lets you sync your Gmail and Google Calendar with the Evolution email client. Evolution happens to be my favorite email program, so that makes me happy.

Mint also includes the usual collection of handy open-source user programs. These include LibreOffice, Firefox, GIMP, for photo editing, Slack, and Pidgin for instant-messaging clients. You can also install Chrome and other programs.

Now, at this point, I usually hear hardcore Windows users complaining about not having Microsoft Office. Guess what? You can. Office Online, Microsoft’s browser-based office-suite, gives you lightweight versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, and Outlook. If you really, really have to have full Microsoft Office, CodeWeavers’ CrossOver 17 for Linux now supports MS-Office 2016.

I’ve been running Mint 18.3 since it first showed up on November 27. Like its predecessors, I’ve found it to be not merely the best Linux desktop, but the best full-featured desktop of any sort. Download it now and find out why I love it so. Enjoy!

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“Rock Solid” Debian 9.3 And “Lightweight” Bodhi Linux 4.4.0 Available — Download Here

Debian “stretch” 9.3

In early 2017, the Debian Release team pushed Debian 9.0 “stretch” release, which would remain supported for the next 5 years. Named after Toy Story’s rubber toy octopus, this release has just witnessed its third update in the form of Debian 9.3 (release notes).

As expected, Debian “stretch” 9.3 ships with tons of security patches and fixes for some serious issues. Prior to this release, on various instances, security advisories for different issues have already been released.

Talking about the bug fixes, there are a total of 68 bug fixes, including startup crash for certain video cards, Debian installer, different package rebuilds for the point release, Python dependencies for different packages, etc.

9e0e6_debian-9-stretch “Rock Solid” Debian 9.3 And “Lightweight” Bodhi Linux 4.4.0 Available — Download Here

On the security front, Debian 9.3 got a total of 56 updates, which affect important packages like Tor, WordPress, curl, wget, firefox, chromium, vlc, samba, etc.

Due to being unmaintained and other security issues, libnet-ping-external-perl package was removed.

If you’re habitual of installing the latest security updates from Debian at regular intervals, you don’t need to perform tons of update. The same goes for package updates.

A comprehensive mirror list for upgrade and installation can be found here.

Apart from the above-mentioned release, The Debian Project also announced the tenth update to oldstable Debian 8. The release announcement for Debian “jessie” 8.10 can be found here.

Bodhi Linux 4.4.0

9e0e6_debian-9-stretch “Rock Solid” Debian 9.3 And “Lightweight” Bodhi Linux 4.4.0 Available — Download Here

Moving to the latest release of the #1 ranked distro on our list of best lightweight operating systems.

The Bodhi Linux developers have shipped the freshly baked images in the form of Bodhi Linux 4.4.0. Delivered three months after Bodhi 4.3.1, it’s a normal update release with an aim to keep all the packages up-to-date. So, don’t expect major changes or new features.

Built on top of dependable Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial base, Bodhi 4.4.0 comes with EFL 1.19.1, Terminology 1.1.0, and Ephoto 1.5. It’s powered by Linux kernel 4.13.

You can head to this link and find the release announcement and ISO/torrent images for Bodhi Linux 4.4.0.

In case you’re having some feedback or you’d like us to cover some specific Linux lists, do let us know. Keep reading Fossbytes.

Also Read: 10 Best Linux Desktop Environments And Their Comparison

New Linux Mint installation guide makes switching from Windows 10 even easier

ef44a_Woman_Laptop_Orange_Happy New Linux Mint installation guide makes switching from Windows 10 even easier

There is a notion that installing a Linux-based operating system can be hard. In 2017, this is absolutely false (with the exception of Arch, that is). Many years ago, installing a distribution could be difficult, but nowadays, it can be downright easy. Quite frankly, installing Linux can sometimes be easier than Windows these days, since you don’t have to go hunting for drivers and software all over the web. If you have been fearful of replacing Windows 10 with an operating system like Linux Mint — don’t be.

But OK, understandably, some people have anxiety about changing their computer’s operating system. If that is you, I am happy to say Linux Mint has a brand new installation guide that should quell any fears. Not only does it help with technical aspects, but it can guide you to the best edition for your needs. Mint in particular is a great alternative to Windows 10.

The Linux Mint Team says the following.

The Linux Mint Installation Guide is ready. This guide is currently available in English and in French and it is currently being translated in many more languages. Three other guides are planned: An overview of Linux Mint, a developer guide and a troubleshooting/bug_reporting guide. This new collection will eventually replace the old ‘Linux Mint User Guide’

ef44a_Woman_Laptop_Orange_Happy New Linux Mint installation guide makes switching from Windows 10 even easier

If you are ready to install Linux Mint and want to use this new installation guide, you can access it here. If you’d prefer, you an also scan the cool QR code above using your smartphone. This is quite useful, as you can easily follow the guide on your phone while doing the installation on your PC.

Photo Credit: JanVlcek / Shutterstock

Install and use Teamviewer 13 for GNU/Linux remote access and support

I have a friend who is about as skilled with computers as I am with nano-technological engineering. That’s a thing, right? Anyway, every month or two, he asks me to ‘fix his computer’ which usually means cleaning junk, malware, and uninstalling anything he shouldn’t have installed. Often, I do this from my computer at home, sometimes from within my GNU/Linux partition.

Teamviewer is a program that essentially lets the user remote control another PC. Teamviewer is also available for mobile devices, which can be incredibly handy for remotely accessing your/others machine from your cellphone. I have ‘fixed’ his computer many times, while on the bus or in a car (as a passenger) thanks to the ability to connect via my cellphone.

Teamviewer is available in most repositories, but can also be downloaded from the Teamviewer downloads page, as of right now Teamviewer 13 is the stable version for GNU/Linux.

You find installation instructions on the TeamViewer Community portal if you need help with that. On most systems, all you have to do is double-click on the downloaded file, or right-click on it and select the “Open With Package Manager” option to do so.

As far as requirements are concerned, TeamViewer runs on 32-bit, 64-bit and ARM devices, and supports Ubuntu (and derivates), Debian, RedHat, CentOS, Fedora, and SUSE officially

TeamViewer for Linux

Once Teamviewer has been installed, accessing a remote machine is incredibly simple; in this article we will just use the basic connection features, but unattended access and other more complicated features are also available.

First, you / the owner of the remote machine, needs to give you the ‘Partner ID’ for the remote machine, and the password. Simply enter the ID number into the appropriate box, followed by the password when requested, and voila, you will shortly later be in total control of the remote machine!

The user who owns the machine that is being remote-controlled, has the ability to end the session at anytime, lock the remote user, etc, in order to help preserve security and prevent someone from doing things they would prefer not done.

You’ll note that there is usually some performance issues on the computer that is remotely accessing the other machine, so using Teamviewer for things like remote-gaming isn’t really feasible. However, navigation of the file system, program installation/management, web browsing, etc, are all quite easily done.

Security wise, all data sent between machines is highly encrypted using RSA 2048 public/private key exchange, AES (256 bit) session encryption from end to end, which is the standard encryption used in most things nowadays; so no need to worry about sensitive information being sniffed or procured in transit, making Teamviewer safe to use for business needs as well.

Teamviewer is free for personal use, so feel free to give it a try if you are unfamiliar with it, or if you too have that one friend who always needs help with their computer.

Now you: Do you use remote access tools? Like what, and for what? Let’s hear about it in the comments!

PR: Bergmannos – New Linux-Based Os for Mining

 PR: Bergmannos – New Linux-Based Os for Mining PR: Bergmannos – New Linux-Based Os for Mining

This is a paid press release, which contains forward looking statements, and should be treated as advertising or promotional material. Bitcoin.com does not endorse nor support this product/service. Bitcoin.com is not responsible for or liable for any content, accuracy or quality within the press release.

Moscow

Bergmann Team has developed a new Linux-based OS for mining BergmannOS, that enables full control over the rigs and automatization of the cryptocurrency mining. Since December 11, 2017 during the entire period of ICO BergmannOS the participants will have access to a shippable beta version of the software complex for miners.

Already in the beta version of BergmannOS miners will be able to estimate the benefits of the main functions of the system. Users are guaranteed 24/7 real time control of the devices, auto and manual tuning of the units, autotuning of video cards (after first update), warning messages in the event of failures, reports on unites’ work, marketing quotation of crypto currencies and news from crypto world. User-friendly interface makes the usage of the system easier.

BergmannOS is a part of developing Bergmann ecosystem that unites separate instruments for the efficient work in cryptosphere. In the nearest future users will have access to a range of different programs for miners inclusive of the trade bot. Within BergmannOS a global update under the code-name Zypher is going to bring great benefits to the users of the system — an access to the Smart Mining option. The auto-mining of the most profitable currencies will be produced according to the results of the inner analyses of the data of each currency, its exchange and trade interaction, the state of the markets as a whole and other data.

Purchasing BERG tokens during the ICO users will be able to try benefits of BergmannOS even before the release of software complex for miners.

Bergmann Project
Bergmann Team has formulated the mission according to which developes its control system and other projects. The mission of Bergmann is developing the ecosystem that unites all elements of blockchain industry. Bergmann Team is committed to its goal of creating software and hardware complexes for users and businesses in the cryptosphere.

Contact Email Address
maria@bergmannos.com
Supporting Link
https://ico.bergmannos.com

This is a paid press release. Readers should do their own due diligence before taking any actions related to the promoted company or any of its affiliates or services. Bitcoin.com is not responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in the press release.

Latest LattePanda SBC runs Linux or Win 10 on Kaby Lake or Gemini Lake

Two second-gen LattePanda hacker SBCs support Ubuntu as well as Win 10, and are available in models that support Kaby Lake and an upcoming “Gemini Lake.”

When DFRobot — now called LattePanda — launched its Intel Atom x5-Z8300 (“Cherry Trail”) based LattePanda SBC in 2015, it was something of an anomaly: a maker-oriented, community-backed SBC that ran only the proprietary Windows 10. Now Shanghai-based LattePanda has returned to Kickstarter with two SBCs that support Ubuntu, as well as Windows 10: the LattePanda Alpha, based on a 7th Gen “Kaby Lake” Core m3-7Y30 with dual 1.6GHz/2.6GHz cores, and a lower-cost LattePanda Delta model with a Celeron N4100 SoC from the upcoming “Gemini Lake” follow-on to Intel’s Apollo Lake family. This quad-core, quad-threaded SoC runs at 1.2GHz/2.4GHz. (See below for new details on Gemini Lake.)

LattePanda Alpha (or Delta) from front and side
(click images to enlarge)

LattePanda is already well on its way to meeting its $97K Kickstarter goal, which runs through Feb. 5, 2018. Shipments are due in May for the SBCs alone, or June for packages that bundle a 7-inch touchscreen, a case, and a “streaming cable.“

When the LattePanda is configured with Windows, the streaming cable enables Linux, Mac, or Windows desktop users to plug the LattePanda into a USB port to provide easy access to a Windows device without requiring partitioning or dual booting. The streaming configuration, which enables a PiP (Picture in Picture) view for “seamless interaction,” is intended primarily for Linux and Mac developers who want to develop Windows 10-based IoT devices.

The major LattePanda funding packages are as follows. (The KS page lists them in Canadian dollars, but here we show them with the supplied US dollar conversions.):

  • LattePanda Delta — with Celeron N4100, 4GB LPDDR4-2400, 32GB eMMC 5.01 — $129 (early bird) or $139 (standard)
  • LattePanda Delta — as above, with activated Windows 10 Pro — $169
  • LattePanda Delta — as above, with activated Windows 10 Pro, streaming cable, 7-inch touchscreen, Titan case — $229
  • LattePanda Alpha — with 8GB LPDDR3-1866 — $269
  • LattePanda Alpha — with 8GB LPDDR3-1866, 64GB eMMC 5.01 — $289 (early bird) or $299 (standard)
  • LattePanda Alpha — as above, with activated Windows 10 Pro — $359
  • LattePanda Alpha — as above, with activated Windows 10 Pro, streaming cable, 7-inch touchscreen, Titan case — $419

LattePanda Alpha/Delta streaming cable view (left) and simplified detail view
(click images to enlarge)

 
Intel’s Gemini Lake

The LattePanda Delta is the first product we’ve seen that promises to run one of Intel’s upcoming “Gemini Lake” SoCs, which will launch next year as a follow-on to Apollo Lake. Leaked details about Gemini Lake first appeared in August on CNXSoft, which included the widely reproduced preliminary block diagram shown below.

Intel Gemini Lake preliminary block diagram
(click image to enlarge; source: CNXSoft)

On Nov. 3, AnandTech provided more preliminary, unconfirmed details on Gemini Lake based on this and other reports, most notably a leaked chart (PDF) from Russia-based Quarta Technologies (see below).

Intel Gemini Lake SKUs
(click image to enlarge; source: Quarta Technologies)

According to AnandTech, there are three desktop models and three mobile parts. Desktop versions include the Celeron J4005, Celeron J4105, and the Pentium Silver J5005. The mobile parts are the Celeron N4000, the LattePanda’s Celeron N4100, and the Pentium Silver N5000.

All the Gemini Lake models use Goldmont Plus cores with the same 14nm fabrication as the Goldmont cores provided in the Apollo Lake (Atom E3900). However, the Goldmont Plus cores are faster because they offer a 4-wide issue design, compared to 3-wide for Apollo Lake, and 2-wide for Airmont cores in the 14nm Cherry Trail and Braswell families. Gemini Lake is also notable for providing 4MB of L2 cache compared to 1MB or 2MB for Apollo Lake. Gemini Lake is expected to provide up to a 128-bit memory controller that supports DDR4 and LPDDR3/4, says AnandTech.

TDPs are expected to be similar to Apollo Lake, and the processors will likely supply the same 18-EU Intel Gen9 LP graphics core as Apollo Lake. However, they will feature an improved multimedia encoding/decoding engine that supports 10-bit VP9, and move up to a Gen10 display controller supporting HDMI 2.0 output. Finally, “Intel has reportedly updated speed acceleration engine of the Gemini Lake to support dynamic neural networks algorithms,” says AnandTech.

 
Inside the LattePanda Alpha and Delta

Like the original LattePanda, the Alpha and Delta models are supported by a community website with a forum and extensive documentation, including pinout details and tutorials. It falls short, however, of being fully open source since full schematics have not been posted. It does appear, however, that the site will maintain an Ubuntu image for download.

LattePanda Alpha/Delta front and back detail views
(click images to enlarge)

The LattePanda Alpha’s Intel Core m3-7Y30 Kaby Lake processor has appeared on the Intel Compute Card, and an almost identical model drives Apple’s latest MacBooks. The configurable TDP on this dual-core, quad-threaded SoC ranges from 3.75W to 7W.

Aside from the processors and memory allotments, the LattePanda Alpha and Delta SBCs appear to be identical. The only exception we can see is that the Alpha offers an M.2 M Key interface that supports PCIe, SATA SSD, and NVMe SSD expansion while the Delta has an M.2 B Key limited to SATA SSD support. The LattePanda Alpha and Delta also include a microSD slot and standard (Delta) or optional (Alpha) eMMC

Dual simultaneous 4K display support is available via the three display connections. There’s an HDMI port (type unstated), an eDP port with touch support, as well as a DisplayPort, which shares a USB Type-C connection that also support USB 3.0 services and power input. An audio jack is also available.

LattePanda Alpha/Delta next to iPhone Plus (left) and optional Tian case
(click images to enlarge)

In addition to the Type-C port, there are three USB 3.0 host ports, a GbE port with Wake-on-LAN, and onboard WiFi-AC and Bluetooth 4.2. Dual 50-pin GPIO connectors include one with an Arduino pinout. As with the original LattePanda, there’s an Arduino-compatible co-processor. Other features include a 12V input, a PMIC, an RTC, and a cooling fan. The optional “Tian” case has its own built-in fan vent.

The somewhat incomplete specifications for the LattePanda Alpha and LattePanda Delta include:

  • Processor — Intel processor with Arduino Leonardo compatible co-processor
    • Alpha — Core m3-7Y30 (4x Kaby Lake cores @ 1.6GHz/2.6GHz); Intel HD Graphics 615 (300-900MHz)
    • Delta — Celeron N4100 (2x Gemini Lake cores @ 1.1GHz/2.4GHz); Intel UHD Graphics 600 (200-700MHz)
  • Memory:
    • Alpha — 8GB LPDDR3-1866; up to 64GB eMMC 5.01
    • Delta — 4GB LPDDR4-2400; 32GB eMMC 5.01
  • Storage expansion:
    • MicroSD slot
    • Alpha — M.2 M Key (SATA, NVMe SSD, PCIe x4)
    • Delta — M.2M B Key — SATA SSD
  • Display:
    • HDMI port
    • DisplayPort (Type-C) shared with USB 3.0
    • eDP with touch support
    • Dual 4K display support
  • Wireless — 802.11ac 2.4GHz/5GHz; Bluetooth 4.2
  • Networking — Gigabit Ethernet port with remote wake-up
  • Other I/O:
    • 3x USB 3.0 host ports
    • USB 3.0 Type-C port with DP, USB, and power-in support
    • 3.5mm audio jack with line-in, mic
  • Expansion:
    • 50-pin GPIO connector with Arduino and EC (BIOS) pinouts
    • 50-pin GPIO connector (I2C, I2S, USB, RS232, UART, etc.)
    • M.2 E-Key — PCIe x2, USB 2.0, I2C, UART
    • Alpha’s M.2 M Key includes PCIe x4
  • Other features — RTC with battery, adjustable cooling fan; optional streaming cable; optional Tian case with integrated fan vent
  • Power — 12V DC input; supports USB Type-C input; power button; PMIC
  • Dimensions — 70 percent smaller than iPhone Plus; 13.5mm profile
  • Operating system — supports Ubuntu Linux and Windows; Optional activated Windows 10 Pro

 
Further information

The LattePanda Alpha and LattePanda Delta are available on Kickstarter through Feb. 5, 2018 at pricing that begins at $129 and $269, respectively. Shipments are due in May or June 2018. Volume shipment packages offer further discounts. More information may be found on the LattePanda Alpha and Delta Kickstarter page, and more will eventually appear on the LattePanda website.
 

These linux laptops are the best (and weirdest) of their kind

Hunting down the best Linux laptops is nowhere near as overwhelming as seeking out the ultimate Windows-based PC. That’s likely due to the smaller number of manufacturers that actually support the open-source platform. HP and Dell are your primary well-known outlets, but there are a few others outside the spotlight offering shiny Linux-flavored gems that are tasty as well.

What you’ll find when investigating the best Linux laptops are an assortment of operating systems including Ubuntu, Elementary OS, and a few other lesser-known Linux distributions. Most of the laptops you will discover are based on Intel processors, and if you’re lucky, discrete graphics chips that support high-quality Linux-compatible games.

To help weed through all the options, we provide our favorite Linux-based laptop, and solutions ranging from premium to budget-friendly computing. If you’re worried about security and privacy invasion, we list a laptop just for you as well. You can’t go wrong with this batch, and if you’re on the market for high-dollar extreme gaming, we link to a few examples for your grazing pleasure.

Our Pick

Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition ($849+)


Out of all the Linux-based options you can find, Dell’s XPS 13 is a well-rounded solution for both the general customer and the enterprise market — in fact, it’s been at the top of our list of best laptops for years. It sports what Dell calls an InfinityEdge display, which translates into a screen with borders measuring just 0.20 inches thick. The design is complemented by a thin and light form factor measuring between 0.3 and 0.6 inches thick, and weighing at least 2.7 pounds.

The processor options consist of two seventh-generation Intel Core chips, and you can configure the laptop with up to 16GB of memory, depending on your starting point (there are four). As shown below, all FHD configurations do not support touch-based input while the QHD+ version is your only touchscreen option. Other notable features include a Thunderbolt 3 port, PCI Express-based storage options, and support for enterprise-class security.

The best premium Linux laptop

System76 Oryx Pro ($1,499+)


If you’re looking for a high-dollar experience, System76 serves up its Oryx Pro in two flavors: 15.6 inches, and 17.3 inches. Both versions have enough horse power to serve as a Linux-based gaming machine sporting seventh-generation Core i7 processors, and Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1060 or 1070 graphics chips. Of course, if you want to go extreme, System76 serves up the bulky Serval WS and Bonobo WS laptops, the latter of which can play host to dual GTX 1080 graphics chips.

As the specs show below, the 15.6-inch model supports FHD and UHD resolutions while the 17.3-inch model only supports FHD. The screens are backed by Intel’s integrated HD Graphics 630 component in its processors in addition to the stand-alone GeForce GPUs. Even more, the Core i7-7820HK is an unlocked processor, enabling Linux gamers to overclock its speed for higher performance. Other notable features include USB-C ports (Gen1), a Mini DisplayPort output, and Thunderbolt 3 support on the 17.3-inch model.

The best Linux laptop for security

Purism Librem ($1,399+)

If you’re looking for a security-focused Linux laptop not manufactured by Dell, the Librem models are a good choice. For example, these laptops include physical switches to completely disable the built-in camera, microphone, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi components. They also rely on the open-source Coreboot firmware, which replaces the typical and proprietary BIOS/UEFI installed in other laptops. You can neutralize the controversial Intel Management Engine on these laptops too.

Outside the security aspect, both models are based on Intel’s sixth-generation Core i7-6500U processor, and Intel’s integrated HD Graphics 520 component. The larger model provides a few additional ports, but both laptops are generally the same feature-wise. Purism plans to offer an 11-inch model based on Intel’s Core M-5Y10c in the near future with a smaller list of connectivity options.

 The best budget Linux laptop

Alpha Litebook ($249)

For laptop seekers on a budget, Alpha’s Litebook costs a mere $249. It’s powered by Intel’s quad-core Celeron N3150 processor for mobile launched in early 2015, and the chips integrated HD Graphics component. It’s an older chip, but that can be expected with laptops in the $249 price range. The memory and storage options are small too, although your best bet storage-wise may be the 500GB hard drive with a built-in 32GB SSD.

Otherwise, this laptop provides a decently-sized screen with a FHD resolution for the price. It’s powered by the popular Elementary OS platform, so you should experience zippy performance due to the lightweight platform. The Litebook provides both ethernet and Wireless N networking, as well as a handful of ports for outputting video and connecting peripherals. You can’t do any high-fidelity gaming on this solution by any means, but it should be great for general use, streaming video, word processing, and so on.




Open source baseboard teams up with Linux-ready MAX 10 FPGA module

Aries launched a $33 “SpiderBase” carrier with a large prototyping area for its recent “MX10” COM, which can run NIOS II softcore Linux on a MAX 10 FPGA.

In March, when we reported on the i.MX6 UL based M6UL computer-on-module from Aries Embedded, we also briefly noted that an MX10 computer-on-module was on the way. Since then, Aries has shipped the MX10, and has now launched a SpiderBase carrier (AKA Spiderboard Baseboard) for the module.

MX10 module (left) and SpiderBase baseboard
(click images to enlarge)

The SpiderBase carrier — but not the MX10 COM — is an open hardware design, with available BOM, Gerber, and KiCAD files licensed under CERN OHL v1.2. Later this year, or in 1Q 2018, the SpiderBase will also be available with an MX10-like COM called the “Spider SoM,” which will offer the same open source hardware licensing as the carrier. All of the open source Spiderboard products will be supported at a Spiderboard.org community site.

 
MX10 COM

The MX10 COM is available with four flavors of MAX 10 FPGA, ranging from a 10M04DC to a 10M50DA. The choice of FPGA affects the level of I/O provided (see spec list below). The F256-packaged MAX 10 FPGA, which implements the bulk of the MX10 COM’s functionality, provides instant-on functionality, integrated analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), and dual configuration flash.

Unlike some other Intel PSG (Altera) FPGAs, such as the Stratix 10, the MX10’s MAX 10 FPGA lacks ARM Cortex-A cores. Yet, the high-end 10M16DA and 10M50DA configured models can still run Linux, as they ship with optional allotments of 128MB and 512MB of DDR3, respectively. These configurations can host a softcore NIOS II Linux stack with U-Boot, which has been around for over a decade. The MX10 can also run FreeRTOS.

MX10 block diagram (left) and spec table
(click images to enlarge)

As shown in the spec table above, the higher-end models also support memory options including 4MB SPI NOR flash and 4GB eMMC. The 10M50DA enabled model also features an RTC with battery backup and a Li-Po charger.

The 70 x 35mm MX10 module interfaces to a carrier board via a 230-pin MXM2 edge connector. The interface implements 178 FPGA GPIO pins, including 13 LVDS transmitters and 54 receivers, plus various other signal and power connections. The module is further equipped with a 25MHz XO programmable clock generator and PLL, with optional external reference input. A PMIC is available, and the I/O voltages are configurable.

The upcoming, open source, similarly MXM2-style Spider SoM module will ship with either the lowest-end 10M02SC MAX 10 part or the mid-range 10M08SA. One Spider SoM module SKU will also offer 4MB SPI flash. It’s unclear if the Spider SoM will offer DDR3, or be able to run NIOS II Linux, but an effort appears to be underway to develop a RISC V softcore for the MAX 10 that would enable the module to run FreeRTOS.

 
SpiderBase carrier board

The open source SpiderBase baseboard extends the MX10 module — and soon the Spider SoM — via the module’s 230-pin MXM2 edge connector. Major features of the baseboard include an Arduino shield interface, 4x PMOD compatible headers (2.5V or 3.3V), and a large prototyping area.

SpiderBase with (left) and without the MX10 COM
(click images to enlarge)

The SpiderBase carrier board is equipped with a mini-USB B port, 2x LEDs, configuration jumpers, reset abd power buttons, and 2x user buttons. Other features include a CR2032 cell holder, a JST-2.0 lithium battery connector, and PICkit and Intel PSG (Altera) Blaster compatible programming interfaces. Like the MX10 module, the simple, 2-layer board supports 0 to 60°C temperatures.

Spiderboard block diagram (left) and detail view
(click images to enlarge)

 
MX10 Evaluation Kit

The MX10 COM is also available with an evaluation kit that offers a more feature rich carrier board. The MX10 Evaluation Kit (MX10EVK) ships with the MX10 module, and includes an SD slot, USB 2.0 host and OTG ports, and dual 10/100 Ethernet ports.

MX10 Evaluation Kit
(click image to enlarge)

You also get 2x RS232 and 2x CAN connections on DB-9 ports, as well as an LCD and JTAG interfaces and a power supply. Like the SpiderBase, the MX10 Evaluation Kit ships with schematics.

 
Further information

The SpiderBase is available for 28.50 Euros ($34) plus VAT and shipping. More information may be found on the Aries Embedded SpiderBase product page, wiki, and shopping pages. The more advanced MX10EVK kit is not listed on the Aries shopping site, but more information may be found in this MX10 brochure (PDF).

The MX10 COM is available for 45 Euros ($53) plus VAT and shipping. More information may be found on the MX10 product page and shopping page. The similar, but open source, Spider SoM will ship by the end of the year or early 1Q 2018, at a currently unstated price. More details for all of the Spider series boards — including sources — will eventually reside at Spiderboard.org.
 

Publisher of Linux Journal says November was its last issue …

Most computer and software magazines have long since been shuttering or moved to digital-only strategies, but the Linux area still had two publications… that is, until now

Claming it has run out of money, Carlie Fairchild, the publisher of Linux Journal, said today that the November issue would be the publication’s last.

7da47_LJ-cover Publisher of Linux Journal says November was its last issue ...“The simple fact is that we’ve run out of money, and options along with it,” Fairchild wrote on the magazine’s website. “We never had a wealthy corporate parent or deep pockets of our own, and that made us an anomaly among publishers, from start to finish. While we got to be good at flying close to the ground for a long time, we lost what little elevation we had in November, when the scale finally tipped irrevocably to the negative.”

“(T)he advertising world we have today would rather chase eyeballs, preferably by planting tracking beacons in readers’ browsers and zapping them with ads anywhere those readers show up. But that future isn’t here, and the past is long gone.”

According to the publisher, the magazine will not be able to return subscriber money, but has swung a deal with Linux Pro Magazine to offer those left with magazines six free issues of the competitor. “In our time of need, they were the first ones there for us, and we are thankful for their gracious offer,” Fairchild wrote.

The magazine has also completed its 2017 archive which it would normally sell but will now be sent to subscribers for free.

“It has been a great run, folks,” concluded Fairchild. “A big hats-off to everyone who contributed to our birth, our success and our persistence over these many years. We’d run the credits now, but the list would be too long, and the risk of leaving worthy people out would be too high. You know who you are. Our thanks again.”

Raspberry Pi, Linux on ARM Users: Now You Get a New Browser Option with Vivaldi

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Steam now lets developers know how many users want their game on Mac and Linux

There’s now a way for Steam users to signal their interest in a game being available for their preferred platform.

Valve has made a change to the developer side of Steam that gives developers a breakdown of the different platforms people choose when adding a game to their wishlist.

This is helpful because it also shows platforms that the game does not currently support, letting the developer know how much interest there is for ports on platforms other than Windows. This is obviously only limited to PC operating systems, so Mac, Linux, and SteamOS.

If a Steam user has a single preferred platform in their personalised store preferences, every game they wishlist – regardless of whether or not it’s available on that platform – will be sent to each respective developer.

d05b9_steam_platform_wishlist_breakdown_1 Steam now lets developers know how many users want their game on Mac and Linux

For instance, if a Steam user only plays on Mac, and they’ve set their store preferences to only show Mac games, Steam will notify the developer of every game they wishlist that doesn’t have a Mac version. This brings no change for users, but it’s one way you could push for a Mac or Linux port of your favourite game.

Microsoft releases ProcDump tool for Linux

Microsoft released a version of the company’s ProdDump application for Linux. ProcDump is a long standing command line utility by Sysinternals, maker of widely used applications such as AutoRuns, ProcessExplorer or Process Monitor.

ProcDump allows you to monitor processes for CPU spikes, and have it generate crash dumps during spikes for analysis. The application supports other types of monitoring including monitoring of windows that hang, and unhandled exception monitoring, The program provides functionality of a general purpose process dump utility on top of all that.

Microsoft released the Linux version of ProcDump, called ProcDump for Linux, a couple of days ago on GitHub.

The minimum operating system and version right now is Ubuntu 14.04 LTS on desktop or server, gdb 7.7.1 or higher, and Linux kernel version 3.5 or higher. Microsoft notes that it is testing the program using other Linux distributions.

The GitHub page highlights installation on Ubuntu 14.04 and Ubuntu 16.04 versions. Microsoft offers instructions for package manager installations and .deb package installations.

Package Manager

Run the following commands:

  1. curl https://packages.microsoft.com/keys/microsoft.asc | gpg –dearmor microsoft.gpg
  2. sudo mv microsoft.gpg /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/microsoft.gpg
  3. On Ubuntu 16.04: sudo sh -c ‘echo “deb [arch=amd64] https://packages.microsoft.com/repos/microsoft-ubuntu-xenial-prod xenial main” etc/apt/sources.list.d/microsoft.list’
  4. On Ubuntu 14.04: sudo sh -c ‘echo “deb [arch=amd64] https://packages.microsoft.com/repos/microsoft-ubuntu-trusty-prod trusty main” /etc/apt/sources.list.d/microsoft.list’

.deb Package

Run the following commands:

  1. On Ubuntu 16.04: wget https://packages.microsoft.com/repos/microsoft-ubuntu-xenial-prod/pool/main/p/procdump/procdump_1.0_amd64.deb
  2. On Ubuntu 14.04: wget https://packages.microsoft.com/repos/microsoft-ubuntu-trusty-prod/pool/main/p/procdump/procdump_1.0_amd64.deb
  3. sudo dpkg -i procdump_1.0_amd64.deb
  4. sudo apt-get -f install

Using ProcDump on Linux

ProcDump does not support the same set of options as the Windows version.

Usage: procdump [OPTIONS…] TARGET

-C CPU threshold at which to create a dump of the process from 0 to 200
-c CPU threshold below which to create a dump of the process from 0 to 200
-M Memory commit threshold in MB at which to create a dump
-m Trigger when memory commit drops below specified MB value.
-n Number of dumps to write before exiting
-s Consecutive seconds before dump is written (default is 10)

TARGET must be exactly one of these:
-p pid of the process

A couple of examples:

  • sudo procdump -p 1234 — Create a core dump
  • sudo procdump -n 3 -p 1234 — Create three core dumps each 10 seconds apart from each other
  • sudo procdump -C 65 -n 3 -p 1234 — Create a core dump when CPU usage reaches 65% or higher, but wait at least 10 seconds between dumps.
  • sudo procdump -C 65 -M 100 -p 1234 — Create a core dump when CPU usage is 65% or higher,or when Memory usage is higher than 100 Megabytes.

Now You: What’s your take on Microsoft releasing tools for Linux?

“Fast And Light” Peppermint 8 Respin Released — Download This Linux Distro Here

The combination of regular desktop programs and cloud-based infrastructure is something that sets Peppermint OS apart from the endless crop of Linux distributions. It also finds a place on our popular list of best lightweight operating systems for older computers.

The latest version of this lightweight operating system was recently made available in the form of respin of Peppermint 8. While respins are known to be a minor release to fix known issues and bring security updates, Peppermint 8 Respin (Release announcement) is a significant release with a multitude of important changes.

Before telling you about the latest changes shipping with this release, let me tell you that it’s based on Lubuntu 16.04 LTS code base. It comes with a hybrid LXDE-Xfce desktop environment and features Xfce bottom panel in LXDE desktop.

What’s new in Peppermint 8 Respin?

Available in both 64-bit and 32-bit versions, the latter one ships with full Secureboot and UEFI support.

The latest ISOs now contain all 16.04 updates. As a result, they ship with Linux 4.10.0-40 kernel from HWE, which will get updated to 4.13 when HWE arrives.

75728_peppermint-8-respin-nemo-file-manager “Fast And Light” Peppermint 8 Respin Released — Download This Linux Distro Here

Moving on to other parts of the distro, Nemo file manager has been updated to version 3.4.7 to add more stability for handling large file operations. OpenVPN has also been updated to 2.4.4 to bring support for mixed mode IPv4/IPv6 VPN’s.

The new Pepirus xfwm4 theme looks like Peppermint 7 xfwm4’s theme. However, it has some additional color tweaks. There are new Pepirus icons and Gtk themes as well.

A switch has been made from lightdm-gtk-greeter to slick-greeter. This brings a more attractive login screen and GUI utility for login screen settings.

To take the latest Peppermint 8 Respin for a drive, visit the website and choose the desired version for download.

Also Read: Lightweight Distro Puppy Linux 7.5 “Xenialpup” Released — Download Now

Chrome 63 Now Available for Android, Linux, Mac, and Windows: What’s New

Google Chrome’s latest software update, version 63, is now rolling out to all users on desktop (Linux, Mac, Windows) and mobile (Android), with updates for Chrome OS to follow shortly.

Chrome 63 brings with it a ton of new features for both desktop and mobile platforms. The highlighting features for both platforms include Flags redesign, Quick Site Certificate, and a new Device Memory Javascript API. On the other hand, Chrome for Android Oreo adds features like Smart Text Selection and a new modal Permissions dialog.

Flags redesign

The chrome://flags webpage gets a facelift with the new Material Design that helps users distinguish between Available and Unavailable in-development Chrome experiments. The feature has been previously used to enable and disable these beta experiments on the Web browser. There is also a new Search bar and a quick button to reset all experiments in one go.

Device Memory JavaScript API

This feature has been added to help users on low-RAM devices. The API automatically detects the amount of memory in the device and can redirect to lite versions of websites in cases of high RAM usage; a great step in improving user experience. Chrome has been infamous, in the past, for consuming more RAM than other major Web browsers.

Site Isolation

This is an interesting new feature that takes forward the work of Google’s sandbox technology. Chrome 63 now lets you isolate certain webpages; content from them is rendered separately making sure that these pages do not share processes or cross-site iframes. This, obviously, comes at a cost: high memory usage. Google estimates that it will be 10-20 percent more than usual.

TLS 1.3 Rollout

TLS or Transport Layer Security is a protocol that configures secure communications for Gmail. The last update for TLS, version 1.2, came back in 2008, and Chrome 63 finally brings the latest in email security after a nine-year wait.

Smart Text Selection

Rolled out with Android 8.0 Oreo, Smart Text Selection is finally a feature in Chrome 63 for Android. Smart Text Selection recommends apps to users based on the text they select in any document, email or webpage. While the use case might be different from user to user, it is a really handy feature to have.

Chrome 63 will be available on your respective desktop/ mobile device in the coming days.




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