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Instagram is testing a standalone messaging app because why not

Available now as part of a test in six select countries.

After starting out as a simple way for sharing photos with friends, family, and random followers, Instagram has grown into a fairly bloated app these days. Along with your regular feed, there’s the Instagram Explore Tab for finding photos the app thinks you’re interested in, a Stories feature taken straight from Snapchat, live streaming, and the ability to send direct messages to other users.

81401_Instagram-main-page_0_0 Instagram is testing a standalone messaging app because why not

According to The Verge, Instagram is playing with the idea of taking that last feature out of its main app and moving it to a standalone one by the name of “Direct.”

Direct is currently available for download as part of a test for Android and iOS in Chile, Israel, Italy, Portugal, Turkey, and Uruguay, and the reason for this move is to get more people using Instagram’s direct messaging service while letting the core Instagram app be a place to share your photos and videos with the entire world.

Instagram Direct opens to the camera viewfinder like Snapchat upon launching it, but you can also choose to swipe down to type out a text-based message. The page to the left is where you’ll find all of your account/app settings, and the one on right is home to your inbox of ongoing conversations. The app itself sounds pretty barebones, but the transition Instagram’s built between the two sounds incredibly sleek.

81401_Instagram-main-page_0_0 Instagram is testing a standalone messaging app because why not

The new Direct app.

When you’re in Direct on your Inbox page, starting to swipe again the left will reveal an Instagram logo, and completing this swipe will automatically open up the main Instagram app. The direct messaging feature is removed from Instagram once Direct is downloaded, but you can easily access it by swiping once again to the left in Instagram to see the Direct logo and then jump right to it.

It’s unclear if Instagram will bring Direct to other countries following its initial testing, but seeing how successful Facebook has been with Messenger after removing direct messaging from its core app, an expansion of Direct to other countries in the coming months wouldn’t be all that surprising.

Instagram adds option for ‘remixing’ photos that friends send to you

Instagram just showed Apple how to fix the iPhone X’s notch

Among many new design changes to the Instagram iOS app lately is one little tweak for the iPhone X: A new volume slider that activates when you use the iPhone X’s volume buttons to change the sound of a video within the app.

It’s the kind of tiny change that app developers make every day, and flies under the radar when Instagram is in the middle of sweeping design changes that have completely overhauled the app. But it’s worth paying attention to this particular tiny change, because it’s what Apple should have done in the first place.

There’s two simple Apple design problems that the Instagram volume slider fixes: the terrible stock volume icon, and the notch. Ever since iOS was first conceived, Apple has used a prominent volume slider that it basically stole from OS X and transplanted into the mobile OS without a thought. It works fine, and having a small translucent icon in the middle of the screen showing volume was never a problem in OS X.

But on a modern-day smartphone, where productivity is measured in seconds and every inch of screen real estate is precious, the massive volume icon is problematic. It’s too intrusive, it often interferes with something you want to watch or tap on, and it hangs around for a second or two after you’ve finished adjusting the volume.

The solution — or, at least, the genius solution that Instagram came up with — is to use one of the “ears” of the screen, created by the notch, for a tiny volume slider. The icon is more consistent with Apple’s current design trend — I don’t see tiny translucent squares used anywhere in iOS 11 — and it’s far less obtrusive. It also makes the notch useful, which is something I never thought I’d write.

A user on Reddit posted a video of the contrast between the two, just in case you need any more proof that Instagram’s designers are better than Apple’s these days.

Instagram just showed Apple how to fix the iPhone X’s notch

Among many new design changes to the Instagram iOS app lately is one little tweak for the iPhone X: A new volume slider that activates when you use the iPhone X’s volume buttons to change the sound of a video within the app.

It’s the kind of tiny change that app developers make every day, and flies under the radar when Instagram is in the middle of sweeping design changes that have completely overhauled the app. But it’s worth paying attention to this particular tiny change, because it’s what Apple should have done in the first place.

There’s two simple Apple design problems that the Instagram volume slider fixes: the terrible stock volume icon, and the notch. Ever since iOS was first conceived, Apple has used a prominent volume slider that it basically stole from OS X and transplanted into the mobile OS without a thought. It works fine, and having a small translucent icon in the middle of the screen showing volume was never a problem in OS X.

But on a modern-day smartphone, where productivity is measured in seconds and every inch of screen real estate is precious, the massive volume icon is problematic. It’s too intrusive, it often interferes with something you want to watch or tap on, and it hangs around for a second or two after you’ve finished adjusting the volume.

The solution — or, at least, the genius solution that Instagram came up with — is to use one of the “ears” of the screen, created by the notch, for a tiny volume slider. The icon is more consistent with Apple’s current design trend — I don’t see tiny translucent squares used anywhere in iOS 11 — and it’s far less obtrusive. It also makes the notch useful, which is something I never thought I’d write.

A user on Reddit posted a video of the contrast between the two, just in case you need any more proof that Instagram’s designers are better than Apple’s these days.

Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Instagram is the most popular photo-sharing social network, and Stories is one of its most intimate components.

A few years ago, Instagram was just a simple competitor to services like VSCO and Hipstamatic, known for heavy-handed filters, square crops, and hashtags. Today, with over 700 million monthly users, it’s one of the largest social networks around, and its new ephemeral Stories feature already has more users within its first year than Snapchat, the popular app that it, ahem, borrowed from.

Snapchat on Android: Everything you need to know

No matter your feelings on Instagram essentially cloning Snapchat, it’s hard to argue against reaching a larger audience. With over 200 million daily users, Stories is a great way to keep up with friends and idols alike — of course, it’s yet another way to keep them in the loop about your own life, too. The simpler interface versus Snapchat doesn’t hurt either, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t still complicated. Lucky for you, there’s a comprehensive guide for that — and you’re looking at it.

Download: Instagram (free)

Getting familiar with Instagram Stories

  • How to view stories
  • How to post stories
  • Text and drawings
  • Filters
  • Stickers
  • Live on Instagram
  • Boomerangs
  • Superzoom
  • Rewind
  • Hands-free

How to view stories

a44b3_instagram-stories-view Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Maybe the most straightforward part of using Instagram Stories is viewing them. From the main screen (denoted by a home icon in the bottom left corner), you’ll notice a row of circular icons at the top displaying the profile pictures of the users you follow who have posted stories within the past 24 hours. You can scroll through the list to find a particular user and tap their icon to view their story, or just hit the Watch All button above the icons. Once you’ve viewed someone’s entire story, the red outline around their profile picture (indicated unseen content) will turn gray.

While you’re viewing a user’s story, their username is displayed in the top left corner of the screen, along with how long ago the content was posted. A bar at the top indicates the length of the story, and if there’s more than one entry in the story that line will be split into equal segments for each part. From there, you can tap on the left or right side of the screen to progress forward or backward through each story — once you finish a user’s story, you’ll automatically advance to the next user in the list until you’ve seen every new post.

One more thing — you can do more than just look while you’re viewing someone’s story. You can send a private message to a user in response to part of their story by tapping the camera icon or text field at the bottom. You can also send part of someone’s story to another user by tapping the paper airplane icon.

Of course, not everything is appropriate for social media, and in the case of Instagram, that includes “violent, nude, partially nude, discriminatory, unlawful, infringing, hateful, pornographic or sexually suggestive photos or other content” (per Instagram’s terms of use). If you come across a story in violation of Instagram’s policies, you can report it using the overflow button inside of the text field.

How to post your own stories

a44b3_instagram-stories-view Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Alright, so it turns out viewing someone else’s story is actually pretty simple after all. Now let’s tackle posting stories of your own.

Start by swiping right from the main feed to access the camera; you’ve undoubtedly done this by accident a few dozen times by now, and you’d be forgiven for confusing this panel for the camera accessed by the plus icon in the middle of Instagram’s navigation bar (which is for capturing photos and videos to post on your profile). Instead, this is the hub for all of the tools that’ll help you post the best stories possible.

Near the bottom of this screen, you’ll see a few tools; namely a shortcut to your recent shots, a flash toggle, the shutter button, the camera switcher, and face filters. There are also a few shooting modes beneath those tools, including live, Boomerang, Superzoom, rewind, and hands-free, as well as a shortcut to your story settings in the upper left corner.

We’ll get to all of that in a bit, but the first thing to do is just take a photo! You can tap the shutter button to quickly take a photo, or hold it down to start capturing video — you can shoot for up to 15 seconds, or let go at any time to stop recording early. If you want to zoom while recording, just slide your finger up or down from the shutter button. Sometimes you might want to share something you’ve already shot, and that’s okay too — just tap the camera roll button in the bottom left corner or swipe up from anywhere in the viewfinder to access all of the photos and videos you’ve captured in the last 24 hours. Once you’ve captured something worth posting, you can add it to your story by tapping Your Story at the bottom of the screen.

Adding text or drawings

a44b3_instagram-stories-view Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Before you post your first story, you might want to spruce it up with some text. You can tap anywhere on the screen to bring up a text input field, and resize your text or change colors using the accompanying tools. Typing @ followed by someone’s username (like, oh I don’t know, @androidcentral or @hayatohuseman) will tag that user in your story, notifying them of the post and creating a link for other users to view their profile. You can also make your text more visible by tapping the button in the middle of the top row to create a white or translucent background.

You can also draw on your story by tapping the marker icon in the upper right corner. There are a few different brush tips to choose from, including a marker, a highlighter, glowing ink, and chalk, as well as an eraser and an undo button to fix small mistakes. Just like with text, you can choose from a number of different preset colors, or pull a color from your shot using the dropper tool.

Face filters

a44b3_instagram-stories-view Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Would it really be a Snapchat clone without silly face filters? You’ve probably already noticed the smiley face icon in the bottom right corner that looks like a toggle for beautification mode. Tap it or press and hold anywhere in the camera viewfinder, and a scrollable row of face filters will appear at the bottom of the screen. It isn’t just the feature itself that’s been ported over, either — the filters themselves are nearly identical replicas of some of Snapchat’s most popular effects, including a cat and dog, sunglasses, and an actual beautification filter.

Still, original or not, these face filters are a fun way to add some flair to a selfie, and the tracking is actually surprisingly good. The filters are able to detect facial movements like raising your eyebrows, opening your mouth or nodding your head, and they react accordingly with different effects and animations.

Latest Instagram update adds face filters and more

Stickers

a44b3_instagram-stories-view Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Filters are yet another whimsical addition to your stories that can add context, viewer participation, or just simple amusement. To access stickers, tap the icon in the top right corner next to the text and marker icons. You’ll be greeted with a vertically scrolling list with dozens of custom stickers, along with all of your phone’s supported emoji to use as stickers. Options range from seasonal stickers (my list is overwhelmingly autumn-themed at the moment) to labels that are clearly catered towards millennials (lit, yasss, it me, ugh, savage, etc).

There are stickers to add the current time or temperature to your story, and you can use the location sticker to tag places of interest just as you would with a regular photo upload on Instagram. You can also use the hashtag sticker to reach a wider audience through Instagram’s search tools, or run a poll that viewers of your story can vote on.

Live on Instagram

Back to those different shooting modes in the Stories camera. Instagram wasn’t satisfied with just taking on (and overtaking) Snapchat, so it went after live streaming platforms like Periscope as well. From the viewfinder, slide the mode selector all the way to the left to access live mode. You can hit Start Live Video to begin publicly streaming, and Instagram will send a push notification to some of your followers letting them know you’re live. Viewers can comment in real time, and at the end of your broadcast the entire stream can be rewatched in your story, denoted with a play button in your story icon.

You can also add a second person to your live stream using the Add icon near the bottom right of the screen. A list will appear with the users currently watching your stream, any of which can be invited to join in a split-screen view. This feature is great for increasing audience engagement during a live stream, and you can remove the second party at any time.

Instagram now lets you live stream with a friend

Boomerangs

a44b3_instagram-stories-view Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Boomerangs are one of my favorite parts of Stories. They’re essentially just animated GIFs for Instagram, with the added bonus of not igniting tired arguments over pronunciation. To start capturing one of your own, swipe over to the Boomerang mode in the Stories viewfinder. An infinity symbol will appear in the shutter button, and tapping it will record a one second looping video that you can edit and share to your story just like any other capture. You can also press and hold the shutter button to capture a longer Boomerang, cutting off after about three seconds.

It hasn’t been updated in over a year, but there’s also a standalone app for capturing Boomerangs, which you can then share to Instagram or Facebook. The nice thing about both the app and the shooting mode in Instagram is that if you really enjoy a particular capture, it doesn’t have to stay confined to your story — you can post Boomerangs to your regular feed the same way you would a photo or video.

Download: Boomerang for Instagram (free)

Superzoom

Superzoom is a just-for-fun feature that, while not particularly useful, will still probably get a laugh out of you when you use it. When recording in Superzoom mode, a dramatic sound effect will play as the camera automatically zooms in on a subject. Switch to the Superzoom shooting mode and a box will appear, denoting where the camera will zoom. The camera immediately begins searching for a face to track, and if none are found it will default to the center of the frame. Once you start shooting, it’s just like any other video — edit away and share it to your story!

Rewind

This one’s pretty self-explanatory. From the rewind shooting mode, you can either tap the shutter button or press and hold to begin recording a video. Once you’ve finished, Instagram will take a second to process the footage and begin playing it back in reverse. This is a bit less robust than Snapchat’s rewind function, which is applied as a filter rather than an entire shooting mode; because of this difference, you can’t change a reversed clip to play back the right way if you change your mind, so make wise use of this effect.

Hands-free stories

As a guitarist who sometimes like to share snippets of songs I’m working on to my story, I really appreciate Instagram’s final shooting mode for Stories, hands-free video. In this mode, you can simply tap the shutter button to begin recording a video, as opposed to needing to press and hold in the normal shooting mode. If you aren’t musically inclined, that’s okay — there are plenty of handy uses for this feature, none of which can be done on Snapchat.

It’s worth mentioning that this feature can be subverted by simply uploading an existing video clip you shot in your phone’s native camera app, but there’s just something different about recording directly from the app you’re sharing to.

Having trouble?

I really like Stories, and Instagram as a whole, but neither is without its flaws. Luckily whenever there’s a problem, Instagram is quick to resolve it, but it’s still good to be aware of the occasional setbacks.

Instagram taking new steps to reduce offensive and spammy comments using machine learning

How to stop Facebook and Instagram notifications from driving you crazy

Got any other tips or tricks?

We tried to make this as detailed as possible, but if we missed anything, let us know in the comments below and we’ll update the article as new features come to Instagram Stories.

Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Instagram is the most popular photo-sharing social network, and Stories is one of its most intimate components.

A few years ago, Instagram was just a simple competitor to services like VSCO and Hipstamatic, known for heavy-handed filters, square crops, and hashtags. Today, with over 700 million monthly users, it’s one of the largest social networks around, and its new ephemeral Stories feature already has more users within its first year than Snapchat, the popular app that it, ahem, borrowed from.

Snapchat on Android: Everything you need to know

No matter your feelings on Instagram essentially cloning Snapchat, it’s hard to argue against reaching a larger audience. With over 200 million daily users, Stories is a great way to keep up with friends and idols alike — of course, it’s yet another way to keep them in the loop about your own life, too. The simpler interface versus Snapchat doesn’t hurt either, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t still complicated. Lucky for you, there’s a comprehensive guide for that — and you’re looking at it.

Download: Instagram (free)

Getting familiar with Instagram Stories

  • How to view stories
  • How to post stories
  • Text and drawings
  • Filters
  • Stickers
  • Live on Instagram
  • Boomerangs
  • Superzoom
  • Rewind
  • Hands-free

How to view stories

a44b3_instagram-stories-view Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Maybe the most straightforward part of using Instagram Stories is viewing them. From the main screen (denoted by a home icon in the bottom left corner), you’ll notice a row of circular icons at the top displaying the profile pictures of the users you follow who have posted stories within the past 24 hours. You can scroll through the list to find a particular user and tap their icon to view their story, or just hit the Watch All button above the icons. Once you’ve viewed someone’s entire story, the red outline around their profile picture (indicated unseen content) will turn gray.

While you’re viewing a user’s story, their username is displayed in the top left corner of the screen, along with how long ago the content was posted. A bar at the top indicates the length of the story, and if there’s more than one entry in the story that line will be split into equal segments for each part. From there, you can tap on the left or right side of the screen to progress forward or backward through each story — once you finish a user’s story, you’ll automatically advance to the next user in the list until you’ve seen every new post.

One more thing — you can do more than just look while you’re viewing someone’s story. You can send a private message to a user in response to part of their story by tapping the camera icon or text field at the bottom. You can also send part of someone’s story to another user by tapping the paper airplane icon.

Of course, not everything is appropriate for social media, and in the case of Instagram, that includes “violent, nude, partially nude, discriminatory, unlawful, infringing, hateful, pornographic or sexually suggestive photos or other content” (per Instagram’s terms of use). If you come across a story in violation of Instagram’s policies, you can report it using the overflow button inside of the text field.

How to post your own stories

a44b3_instagram-stories-view Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Alright, so it turns out viewing someone else’s story is actually pretty simple after all. Now let’s tackle posting stories of your own.

Start by swiping right from the main feed to access the camera; you’ve undoubtedly done this by accident a few dozen times by now, and you’d be forgiven for confusing this panel for the camera accessed by the plus icon in the middle of Instagram’s navigation bar (which is for capturing photos and videos to post on your profile). Instead, this is the hub for all of the tools that’ll help you post the best stories possible.

Near the bottom of this screen, you’ll see a few tools; namely a shortcut to your recent shots, a flash toggle, the shutter button, the camera switcher, and face filters. There are also a few shooting modes beneath those tools, including live, Boomerang, Superzoom, rewind, and hands-free, as well as a shortcut to your story settings in the upper left corner.

We’ll get to all of that in a bit, but the first thing to do is just take a photo! You can tap the shutter button to quickly take a photo, or hold it down to start capturing video — you can shoot for up to 15 seconds, or let go at any time to stop recording early. If you want to zoom while recording, just slide your finger up or down from the shutter button. Sometimes you might want to share something you’ve already shot, and that’s okay too — just tap the camera roll button in the bottom left corner or swipe up from anywhere in the viewfinder to access all of the photos and videos you’ve captured in the last 24 hours. Once you’ve captured something worth posting, you can add it to your story by tapping Your Story at the bottom of the screen.

Adding text or drawings

a44b3_instagram-stories-view Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Before you post your first story, you might want to spruce it up with some text. You can tap anywhere on the screen to bring up a text input field, and resize your text or change colors using the accompanying tools. Typing @ followed by someone’s username (like, oh I don’t know, @androidcentral or @hayatohuseman) will tag that user in your story, notifying them of the post and creating a link for other users to view their profile. You can also make your text more visible by tapping the button in the middle of the top row to create a white or translucent background.

You can also draw on your story by tapping the marker icon in the upper right corner. There are a few different brush tips to choose from, including a marker, a highlighter, glowing ink, and chalk, as well as an eraser and an undo button to fix small mistakes. Just like with text, you can choose from a number of different preset colors, or pull a color from your shot using the dropper tool.

Face filters

a44b3_instagram-stories-view Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Would it really be a Snapchat clone without silly face filters? You’ve probably already noticed the smiley face icon in the bottom right corner that looks like a toggle for beautification mode. Tap it or press and hold anywhere in the camera viewfinder, and a scrollable row of face filters will appear at the bottom of the screen. It isn’t just the feature itself that’s been ported over, either — the filters themselves are nearly identical replicas of some of Snapchat’s most popular effects, including a cat and dog, sunglasses, and an actual beautification filter.

Still, original or not, these face filters are a fun way to add some flair to a selfie, and the tracking is actually surprisingly good. The filters are able to detect facial movements like raising your eyebrows, opening your mouth or nodding your head, and they react accordingly with different effects and animations.

Latest Instagram update adds face filters and more

Stickers

a44b3_instagram-stories-view Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Filters are yet another whimsical addition to your stories that can add context, viewer participation, or just simple amusement. To access stickers, tap the icon in the top right corner next to the text and marker icons. You’ll be greeted with a vertically scrolling list with dozens of custom stickers, along with all of your phone’s supported emoji to use as stickers. Options range from seasonal stickers (my list is overwhelmingly autumn-themed at the moment) to labels that are clearly catered towards millennials (lit, yasss, it me, ugh, savage, etc).

There are stickers to add the current time or temperature to your story, and you can use the location sticker to tag places of interest just as you would with a regular photo upload on Instagram. You can also use the hashtag sticker to reach a wider audience through Instagram’s search tools, or run a poll that viewers of your story can vote on.

Live on Instagram

Back to those different shooting modes in the Stories camera. Instagram wasn’t satisfied with just taking on (and overtaking) Snapchat, so it went after live streaming platforms like Periscope as well. From the viewfinder, slide the mode selector all the way to the left to access live mode. You can hit Start Live Video to begin publicly streaming, and Instagram will send a push notification to some of your followers letting them know you’re live. Viewers can comment in real time, and at the end of your broadcast the entire stream can be rewatched in your story, denoted with a play button in your story icon.

You can also add a second person to your live stream using the Add icon near the bottom right of the screen. A list will appear with the users currently watching your stream, any of which can be invited to join in a split-screen view. This feature is great for increasing audience engagement during a live stream, and you can remove the second party at any time.

Instagram now lets you live stream with a friend

Boomerangs

a44b3_instagram-stories-view Instagram Stories on Android: Everything you need to know

Boomerangs are one of my favorite parts of Stories. They’re essentially just animated GIFs for Instagram, with the added bonus of not igniting tired arguments over pronunciation. To start capturing one of your own, swipe over to the Boomerang mode in the Stories viewfinder. An infinity symbol will appear in the shutter button, and tapping it will record a one second looping video that you can edit and share to your story just like any other capture. You can also press and hold the shutter button to capture a longer Boomerang, cutting off after about three seconds.

It hasn’t been updated in over a year, but there’s also a standalone app for capturing Boomerangs, which you can then share to Instagram or Facebook. The nice thing about both the app and the shooting mode in Instagram is that if you really enjoy a particular capture, it doesn’t have to stay confined to your story — you can post Boomerangs to your regular feed the same way you would a photo or video.

Download: Boomerang for Instagram (free)

Superzoom

Superzoom is a just-for-fun feature that, while not particularly useful, will still probably get a laugh out of you when you use it. When recording in Superzoom mode, a dramatic sound effect will play as the camera automatically zooms in on a subject. Switch to the Superzoom shooting mode and a box will appear, denoting where the camera will zoom. The camera immediately begins searching for a face to track, and if none are found it will default to the center of the frame. Once you start shooting, it’s just like any other video — edit away and share it to your story!

Rewind

This one’s pretty self-explanatory. From the rewind shooting mode, you can either tap the shutter button or press and hold to begin recording a video. Once you’ve finished, Instagram will take a second to process the footage and begin playing it back in reverse. This is a bit less robust than Snapchat’s rewind function, which is applied as a filter rather than an entire shooting mode; because of this difference, you can’t change a reversed clip to play back the right way if you change your mind, so make wise use of this effect.

Hands-free stories

As a guitarist who sometimes like to share snippets of songs I’m working on to my story, I really appreciate Instagram’s final shooting mode for Stories, hands-free video. In this mode, you can simply tap the shutter button to begin recording a video, as opposed to needing to press and hold in the normal shooting mode. If you aren’t musically inclined, that’s okay — there are plenty of handy uses for this feature, none of which can be done on Snapchat.

It’s worth mentioning that this feature can be subverted by simply uploading an existing video clip you shot in your phone’s native camera app, but there’s just something different about recording directly from the app you’re sharing to.

Having trouble?

I really like Stories, and Instagram as a whole, but neither is without its flaws. Luckily whenever there’s a problem, Instagram is quick to resolve it, but it’s still good to be aware of the occasional setbacks.

Instagram taking new steps to reduce offensive and spammy comments using machine learning

How to stop Facebook and Instagram notifications from driving you crazy

Got any other tips or tricks?

We tried to make this as detailed as possible, but if we missed anything, let us know in the comments below and we’ll update the article as new features come to Instagram Stories.

We Recreated Instagram Makeup Trends and Shot Them With an iPhone X

Makeup-wise, pink and yellow were the standout shades of 2017. Pink carried over from last year’s millennial pink craze, while yellow popped up out of nowhere, even appearing in blush form. Makeup artists also proved that too much of one color is definitely a good thing, matching their lids to their lips, their cheeks to their lips, or even sometimes, matching every piece of makeup on their face.

In our case, we coated Emma and Yasmin’s lids with Lemonhead’s Spacepaste in Jailbait and Mulholland. For lashes, we swept on coordinating shades from the Make Up For Ever Flash Color Palette with a spoolie brush.

16-year-old boy sells spot in iPhone X queue on Instagram

A 16-year-old Mc Donald’s employee and an iPhone lover himself, decided to mint some money while awaiting the new Apple iPhoneX in the queue.

According to reports in Daily Mail, Lee Cselko brought two chairs to line up for the release of the iPhone X in Sydney, Australia.

He managed to grab the 24 and 25 place from the front of the line and took one spot-saver for himself while another he put up for auction to hardcore Apple fans desperate to get their hands on the new product straight away.

 

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Instagram now lets you livestream with a friend

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Video: How to Post to Instagram From Your Computer

Here’s a quick 2-minute video tutorial by photographer Travis Transient on how to post photos to Instagram using the browser on your desktop computer. The trick involves using the Developer Tools feature in your browser and using your browser as a mobile browser.

This video may be helpful for those of you who enjoy learning things in video form. If you’d like a more in-depth step-by-step tutorial on this same technique, we published our own tutorial earlier this year. There’s also a new app called Windowed that’s designed to help you upload photos from Windows and Mac computers.

There are hundreds of free iPhone scams on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube

There’s no such thing as a free iPhone — but there’s always someone willing to convince you otherwise. With the iPhone 8 already in stores and the iPhone X arriving in three weeks, scammers have sprung into action, using the promise of a free phone to trick people into giving up their information or worse, often using some of the web’s biggest platforms as a launching pad for the scam.

A quick Facebook search turns up dozens of Facebook groups devoted to free iPhone scams, typically offering to send along the phone after a particular task had been completed. One offered to send a phone in a drawing among users who subscribed to an Indian viral content site and invited 50 friends; another referred users to Xpango, a referral site that has been described as a pyramid scheme.

There are many, many more. A report published today by ZeroFox found 532 such pages across Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Google+. The simplest attacks were asking for likes or follows that could be sold or used to push more aggressive schemes, a practice the researchers call “fame farming.” Seventy-four of the pages offered outright malware links, but most were more subtle. The majority of the pages ZeroFox found asked users to fill out forms in exchange for their free iPhone, harvesting information that could later be used for social engineering or identity theft.

According to ZeroFox researcher Phil Tully, the scams weren’t hard to find. “Any time someone is offering an iPhone for free, it’s going to raise a red flag,” Tully says. “The chance that that that is going to be a legitimate deal is pretty low.”


a2d64_iphone_8_official There are hundreds of free iPhone scams on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube

ZeroFox’s report focused on social platforms, but the same scams are an issue in search. The “free iphone” search (which averages about 10 hits a day, per Google Trends) is full of paid links to legit services, and either full-price iPhones or no-money-down contract deals from carriers. But beyond the paid ads, the first page of search results was dominated by dubious surveys and “product testing” offers — exactly the sites you’d expect to be optimizing for a “free iPhone” search.

Reached by The Verge, Facebook said it uses a combination of automated systems to scan for fraud, and that users should report any scams they come across. A Facebook bulletin published earlier this week warned users to be suspicious of romance and loan scammers, and told users to be suspicious of anyone asking for money or attempting to move a conversation off Facebook.

When Tully reports scam posts, he says they’re usually taken down within the day, but that doesn’t do much to keep crime off the platform overall. “I think [platforms] are pushing a lot of resources into the problem,” Tully says, “but you’re limited by the creativity of the scammers. Just taking down one of their posts won’t stop them. They’ll adopt really creative methods to find a way around that filter.”

Android Users Now Have A Big Advantage On Instagram – Forbes

Instagram has been testing yet another new feature, but so far only Android users are getting it.

db81d_960x0 Android Users Now Have A Big Advantage On Instagram - Forbes

The Instagram app logo (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)

For a long time now it’s been difficult to see easily when a particular user is following you. All you can do is scroll through your (often huge) list of followers to see if their username shows up.

Now, according to a report in Digital Spy, a new notification has started to appear on Android versions of the Instagram app. Browsing any given user’s feed will now display a prominent “Follows you” indication if they are indeed following your account.

While this is certainly handy for Instagrammers to see when someone they respect is following them, it also has the less heartwarming side effect of making it a whole lot more obvious when someone stops following you  – cue the spate of petty tit-for-tat unfollowings.

Unusually iOS users, who have grown accustomed to being first in line to receive new features, appear to have been left out of this update which seems to be appearing only on some Android devices for now.

Instagram has gradually been making it easier to track followers for some time now, with “Following” and “You follow each other” indicators appearing (unreliably) in searches since the beginning of 2016. However, this latest update makes it much more likely users will notice their ‘following’ status incidentally without having to go searching for it.

Perhaps it’s time for Instagram to introduce a version of Twitter’s ‘mute’ function, which will hide another user’s content without unfollowing them or, perhaps more importantly, alerting them to the fact you’re no longer interested in their posts.

More On Forbes

Instagram Testing New Feed-Breaking Layout

Instagram’s Big Layout Change Infuriates Users

GoPro Hero6 Leak Reveals iPhone X Challenger

Samsung Galaxy S9 Video Camera Tipped To Be 4 Times Faster Than iPhone X

Google’s Brilliant iPhone App Sucks On Android

 

Android Users Now Have A Big Advantage On Instagram

Instagram has been testing yet another new feature, but so far only Android users are getting it.

b6508_960x0 Android Users Now Have A Big Advantage On Instagram

The Instagram app logo (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)

For a long time now it’s been difficult to see easily when a particular user is following you. All you can do is scroll through your (often huge) list of followers to see if their username shows up.

Now, according to a report in Digital Spy, a new notification has started to appear on Android versions of the Instagram app. Browsing any given user’s feed will now display a prominent “Follows you” indication if they are indeed following your account.

While this is certainly handy for Instagrammers to see when someone they respect is following them, it also has the less heartwarming side effect of making it a whole lot more obvious when someone stops following you  – cue the spate of petty tit-for-tat unfollowings.

Unusually iOS users, who have grown accustomed to being first in line to receive new features, appear to have been left out of this update which seems to be appearing only on some Android devices for now.

Instagram has gradually been making it easier to track followers for some time now, with “Following” and “You follow each other” indicators appearing (unreliably) in searches since the beginning of 2016. However, this latest update makes it much more likely users will notice their ‘following’ status incidentally without having to go searching for it.

Perhaps it’s time for Instagram to introduce a version of Twitter’s ‘mute’ function, which will hide another user’s content without unfollowing them or, perhaps more importantly, alerting them to the fact you’re no longer interested in their posts.

More On Forbes

Instagram Testing New Feed-Breaking Layout

Instagram’s Big Layout Change Infuriates Users

GoPro Hero6 Leak Reveals iPhone X Challenger

Samsung Galaxy S9 Video Camera Tipped To Be 4 Times Faster Than iPhone X

Google’s Brilliant iPhone App Sucks On Android

 




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