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How to force close apps on iPhone X


 

With Apple’s removal of the home button on iPhone X, the company had to translate a few user interface controls into onscreen gestures, including a new swipe and tap system for force closing troublesome apps.

88cc5_24008-30999-171212-Close-l How to force close apps on iPhone X

With iPhone 8 and below, users are able to open iPhone’s multitasking interface with a quick double tap on the home button. From there, a simple swipe up on app panes force close those titles, whether they are actively running in the background or in stasis.

On iPhone X, the app switcher is invoked with a sightly less intuitive procedure. Here’s how to do it:

Step 1: From the home screen or any app, swipe up from the bottom of the screen and pause. This will invoke iOS multitasking, also known as the app switcher.

88cc5_24008-30999-171212-Close-l How to force close apps on iPhone X

Step 2: Touch and hold on any app pane. A red icon with a minus symbol will appear at the top left of each app pane.

88cc5_24008-30999-171212-Close-l How to force close apps on iPhone X

Step 3: Swipe left or right to a desired app.

Step 4: Tap on the red icon to close the app. Alternatively, apps can be closed by swiping up on an app pane while in this view.

via GIPHY

It is well known that force closing apps on iOS is unnecessary under normal conditions. Shutting down apps in the app switcher does not save energy or CPU cycles as the apps themselves are not constantly running.

That said, there are certain scenarios in which an app might need to be force closed to improve performance or maintain system integrity. Examples include apps that have crashed, become unresponsive during use or are found to be conducting unwarranted background activity. The latter can be checked by navigating to battery usage statistics found in Settings Battery. Forcing such apps to close using the method above then reopening them should solve most problems.

How to force close apps on iPhone X


 

With Apple’s removal of the home button on iPhone X, the company had to translate a few user interface controls into onscreen gestures, including a new swipe and tap system for force closing troublesome apps.

96fac_24008-30999-171212-Close-l How to force close apps on iPhone X

With iPhone 8 and below, users are able to open iPhone’s multitasking interface with a quick double tap on the home button. From there, a simple swipe up on app panes force close those titles, whether they are actively running in the background or in stasis.

On iPhone X, the app switcher is invoked with a sightly less intuitive procedure. Here’s how to do it:

Step 1: From the home screen or any app, swipe up from the bottom of the screen and pause. This will invoke iOS multitasking, also known as the app switcher.

96fac_24008-30999-171212-Close-l How to force close apps on iPhone X

Step 2: Touch and hold on any app pane. A red icon with a minus symbol will appear at the top left of each app pane.

96fac_24008-30999-171212-Close-l How to force close apps on iPhone X

Step 3: Swipe left or right to a desired app.

Step 4: Tap on the red icon to close the app. Alternatively, apps can be closed by swiping up on an app pane while in this view.

via GIPHY

It is well known that force closing apps on iOS is unnecessary under normal conditions. Shutting down apps in the app switcher does not save energy or CPU cycles as the apps themselves are not constantly running.

That said, there are certain scenarios in which an app might need to be force closed to improve performance or maintain system integrity. Examples include apps that have crashed, become unresponsive during use or are found to be conducting unwarranted background activity. The latter can be checked by navigating to battery usage statistics found in Settings Battery. Forcing such apps to close using the method above then reopening them should solve most problems.

How to force close apps on iPhone X


 

With Apple’s removal of the home button on iPhone X, the company had to translate a few user interface controls into onscreen gestures, including a new swipe and tap system for force closing troublesome apps.

96fac_24008-30999-171212-Close-l How to force close apps on iPhone X

With iPhone 8 and below, users are able to open iPhone’s multitasking interface with a quick double tap on the home button. From there, a simple swipe up on app panes force close those titles, whether they are actively running in the background or in stasis.

On iPhone X, the app switcher is invoked with a sightly less intuitive procedure. Here’s how to do it:

Step 1: From the home screen or any app, swipe up from the bottom of the screen and pause. This will invoke iOS multitasking, also known as the app switcher.

96fac_24008-30999-171212-Close-l How to force close apps on iPhone X

Step 2: Touch and hold on any app pane. A red icon with a minus symbol will appear at the top left of each app pane.

96fac_24008-30999-171212-Close-l How to force close apps on iPhone X

Step 3: Swipe left or right to a desired app.

Step 4: Tap on the red icon to close the app. Alternatively, apps can be closed by swiping up on an app pane while in this view.

via GIPHY

It is well known that force closing apps on iOS is unnecessary under normal conditions. Shutting down apps in the app switcher does not save energy or CPU cycles as the apps themselves are not constantly running.

That said, there are certain scenarios in which an app might need to be force closed to improve performance or maintain system integrity. Examples include apps that have crashed, become unresponsive during use or are found to be conducting unwarranted background activity. The latter can be checked by navigating to battery usage statistics found in Settings Battery. Forcing such apps to close using the method above then reopening them should solve most problems.

For computers that are fair, New York City forms algorithm task force

c31b6_computer-code-abstract-getty For computers that are fair, New York City forms algorithm task force(Getty Images)

From water and heat to public transit, cities have laws to govern nearly every aspect of community life. New York City is now expanding this governance with legislation to monitor computer algorithms.

The New York City Council unanimously passed a piece of legislation Monday directing the creation of a task force that will advise policymakers and city staff on how computer algorithms are monitored and evaluated. The law says the new task force will study “how information on agency automated decision systems may be shared with the public and how agencies may address instances where people are harmed by agency automated decision systems.” 

While oversight bodies are common for other functions of government, this is one of the first charged with routinely monitoring government computer code for ethical violations.

As a supporter of the legislation, the ACLU lobbied for the bill and said in a blog post that algorithms demand greater oversight since they lay the groundwork for critical decisions made by government.

“Algorithms are sometimes thought of as the perfect embodiment of objectivity, but the truth is that they are highly vulnerable to human bias,” NYCLU Executive Director Donna Lieberman wrote. “As algorithms become ubiquitous, this bill provides an opportunity for the city to grapple with the critical questions they present, and develop policies that promote transparency and prevent abuse.”

In New York City, algorithms influence how first responders are dispatched, how business license applications are processed, they calculate department budgets and handle 311 requests like graffiti removal.

“A flawed algorithm can lead to someone being trapped in jail for no good reason or not receiving a public benefit,” NYCLU Legislative Counsel Rashida Richardson said in a statement. “This bill is the first in the nation to take such a broad view of the problem and recognize that, for algorithms to benefit society, they must be subject to public scrutiny and a mechanism to remedy flaws and biases.”

Even with its strong support from the city council, the task force will have the difficult job of determining how the city can monitor algorithms that manage its most sensitive data and critical services. 

The city has not yet announced when the task force will be established.

Reporter barred from Mississippi mental health task force meetings

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During Mississippi’s mental health task force’s third meeting since Attorney General Jim Hood created it last summer, a security guard stood by the elevators at the Walter Sillers State Office Building in downtown Jackson, asking folks attempting to enter if they were “on the task force.”

That’s because members of the public and press have been barred from attending the gatherings, which take place on the 13th floor — in the press room. The meetings, in which attendees are split into several subcommittees, are designed to address issues within the state’s multi-pronged mental health system.

They met Wednesday for nearly four hours.

MS Pulse: Mississippi has a transparency problem and it could be hurting health

Hood’s office is defending the state in a lawsuit U.S. Department of Justice filed against Mississippi in 2016 for its delivery of mental health services. The state is accused of having too great a reliance on institutional versus community-based care.

Building officials said the public cannot visit the public, taxpayer-funded offices in the Sillers building — including the governor’s office and Medicaid — unless they have an appointment.

The task force is made up of representatives from more than 30 agencies, many that already serve folks with mental illnesses. The group includes health care professionals, judges, law enforcement officers, academics and advocates, as well as lawmakers Rep. Chris Bell, D-Jackson, Rep. Becky Currie, R-Brookhaven, Sen. Hob Bryan, R-Amory, and Rep. Bryant Clark, D-Pickens.

The attorney general’s office claims the group is not subject to the Open Meetings Act because it is not drafting legislation or policy, only recommendations.

A press release on the task force says it “will also review current legislation as well as needs for additional legislation.”

A similar task force created by Gov. Phil Bryant to study the state’s opioid crisis, an issue that overlaps greatly with mental health, also wrote recommendations. It held meetings open to the public.

The membership of the mental health task force, the only folks authorized to attend meetings, is in flux, said Hood’s spokesperson Margaret Morgan. Morgan said Hood extended an invitation to participate to many groups, which either accepted, declined, or even invited others in the field to join.

Hood, a likely candidate for governor in 2019, asked task force members to decide whether other members of the public or press should be allowed to attend. A majority of respondents said they preferred the meetings be closed, making it impossible for outside review to determine the group’s productivity.

Morgan has provided the Clarion Ledger the contact information for at least three members of the task force who said they’d be willing to talk to reporters. 

One of those members, Biloxi Police Chief Chris De Back, said his involvement on the task force focuses mainly with coordinating efforts between mental health professionals and law enforcement to identify folks in crisis and provide “the necessary services they need before it ends up in a law enforcement capacity.”

In general, De Back said the task force is good for bringing folks of all disciplines together from across the state to learn how each person plays a role — something advocates have pleaded for over the years.

“There are all kinds of services out there. The problem is the services aren’t working together or they don’t know about each other,” De Back said. “By becoming a team, bringing everything together, we can be more efficient and, in the long run, more effective.”

Sen. Bryan said Wednesday he doesn’t understand why the meetings are closed and was willing to discuss what his subcommittee addressed: improvements to the state’s commitment process.

Bryan said the state has made progress with commitments, a process “based on a law that existed a hundred years ago, passed when there wasn’t the knowledge there is now.” His subcommittee is discussing ways to continue moving away from commitments being the default way to get services for someone with a mental illness.

 

The Force was with computer tech’s Star Wars tribute

Josh Montgomery said he was somewhat of a late bloomer in the Star Wars fandom. The 40-year-old computer technician only became an avid fan of the popular science fiction series in the last few years, and he certainly doesn’t consider himself a collector – although one piece in his small selection of Star Wars memorabilia is sure to make any fan look twice: a full-sized, fully functional replica of R2-D2, the lovable droid that has appeared countless times in Star Wars films, books and other media.

Montgomery, who works as a full-time assistant computer science professor at Southern State Community College and as part-time director of technology at Chillicothe City School District, has been working on the robot for two and a half years, and he still has some adjustments to make.

Standing at a little over three feet tall, the 175-pound robot is powered by two 12-volt batteries and equipped with four computers, countless LED lights and movement mechanisms, and even a phone charger hidden beneath a panel on its side.

The droid is powered by two “hacked” PlayStation 3 controllers and a remote, and moves on three wheels powered by scooter motors.

Montgomery said most of his building time was spent perfecting the robot’s aluminum dome “head,” the shell of which he obtained from a man in Texas who has the exact cast dimensions used to manufacture the original film prop.

According to Montgomery, six different versions of the prop were built for the first film in the series, some of which could fit a human inside. As the series gained popularity, the droid’s design became iconic, and many fans have gone on to build partial and exact replicas.

Montgomery said his R2-D2 story began a number of years ago when he and his daughter went to a Star Wars fan convention dressed as characters from the series.

“I can’t do anything half-way,” Montgomery joked, saying his daughter dressed up as Princess Leia, one of the main characters, and he went in an elaborate portrayal of Boba Fett, a primary villain in one of the films.

“We just had a blast,” he said.

Over the course of a year, Montgomery said he perfected the Boba Fett costume to 100-percent accuracy of the one used in the original film – right down to the scratches on its painted helmet.

He soon had it registered as an exact replica, and sold it to fund a “new nerd project,” – the R2-D2 replica.

Montgomery said he researched how to build one, then began contracting with a number of machine shops in Japan, Texas, Chillicothe and Columbus for custom parts, and he started chipping away.

“You just kind of keep working with it and keep working with it until you get it perfect,” he said.

When asked what he found to be the most challenging aspect of the droid’s construction, Montgomery laughed and said, “Oh my god, all of it… All of it has been really hard.”

Montgomery said painting R2-D2 was difficult, since the type of paint used on the robot had to be mixed and applied to perfectly match the movie prop.

Working with machine shops was also particularly challenging, since some of his requests would be met with blank stares.

Montgomery said the programming was “so hard,” since everything from the LED lights on the sides – which are programmed to the exact light patterns used by the original film prop – right down to the aluminum flaps that open and close to the beat of a Star Wars song played by an interior speaker, took hours of work to coordinate.

The project often hit dead ends, Montgomery said, but he worked around each one.

Montgomery said he hopes the finished project will demonstrate to his students and others that anything can be achieved with dedication.

“Anything they want to accomplish in life, they can accomplish,” he said.

Although he hasn’t yet managed to get the robot out of his basement – he’ll have to deconstruct it just to get it through the door – Montgomery said he has already received requests from schools and colleges for visits, and one person even asked him to bring it to their wedding to be the ring bearer.

At this point, Montgomery said he doesn’t even know how much it cost to build.

“Took me more time than money,” he said, but, “I’ve really enjoyed it. It’s been a lot of fun.”

Montgomery lives with his wife and children in the Greenfield area.

Videos showing the functions of Montgomery’s R2-D2 can be viewed on YouTube here and here.

Reach David Wright at 937-402-2570, or on Twitter @DavidWrighter.

8f67a_web1_fr2d21 The Force was with computer tech's Star Wars tribute

8f67a_web1_fr2d21 The Force was with computer tech's Star Wars tribute

By David Wright

dwright@aimmediamidwest.com

New Task Force Focused on Mental Health Response After Disasters

The Shelby County Health Department, working with several community partners, has assembled a first-of-its-kind volunteer task force in Tennessee that will respond to behavioral and mental health challenges after mass-casualty disasters.

HELEN MORROW

The Mid-South Disaster Behavioral Health Response Team, or DBHRT, is currently composed of about 100 volunteers. Shelby County Health Department officer Dr. Helen Morrow said the plan is to grow that number to 400 by the year 2020.

The volunteers come from a diversity of backgrounds, from fields that include education, medicine, mental health, nursing, psychiatry and more. They’re trained to respond to the emotional and mental health needs that follow a major, mass-casualty event like a natural disaster, act of terrorism or incident like a mass shooting.

The formation of the task force has been in the works for a few years now. Its launch is a response to the fact that, once immediate medical needs have been addressed, such disasters can still leave a mental health impact that’s long-lasting and results in lingering scars on individuals, families and communities.

That’s according to Shelby County Health Department director Dr. Alisa Haushalter.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said the efforts of Haushalter, her department and the team of volunteers serve “a vital role in times of crisis.”

Volunteers undergo standardized training that consists of six core courses, including Psychological First Aid and PsySTART, a mental health triage system. Ongoing education will include such topics as active shooter incidents, children in disasters, cultural competency, infectious diseases, and shelter operations.

“Think about people that have been through a disaster and have had their homes destroyed, or they’re displaced or they’ve been involved in a terrorist event,” Morrow said. “How do they deal with this? What are their needs? Those need to be assessed.”

Morrow learned years ago about the impact of losing your home in a disaster or witnessing a horrific event, and how people respond to that and to interventional changes.

“And people need to know how to make these assessments of people, how to assess their needs,” she said.

Some people, she said, can be very talkative after such an event, while other people “can be kind of shell-shocked. And you have to know how to assess those people to know how to help them.”

The DBHRT is intended to supplement local resources, not replace them. The team will work with communities throughout the Memphis area, including in Shelby, Tipton, and Fayette counties in Tennessee; DeSoto County, Mississippi; and Crittenden County, Arkansas.

In a large-scale incident, if needed, the team can also deploy anywhere in the U.S. in response to an official request for help.

Volunteers who wants to join submit an application and if approved – information can be found at www.shelbytnhealth.com – they’ll start taking free courses offered by groups including the Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Texas AM University and national subject-matter experts.

Volunteers have to be at least 18 years old. Holding current licensure in any behavioral health field is preferred, but not required.

The response team is sponsored by the Shelby County Health Department’s 150th Medical Reserve Corps.

Program guidance is provided by the Tennessee Region VII Disaster Mental Health Response Committee, which is comprised of Alliance Healthcare Services, Red Cross of the Mid-South, Youth Villages, Shelby County Office of Preparedness, City of Memphis Fire Department, Shelby County Schools’ Mental Health Center, Methodist University Hospital and Universal Health Services.

Use the Force to protect your iPhone with Otterbox Star Wars cases

Otterbox wants to help protect your phone with the power of the Force, thanks to its latest series of Star Wars-themed iPhone cases: the Symmetry Series Star Wars Collection.

The cases come in a range of different designs, with a number of different Star Wars characters and graphics on them. For example, you could go for the nicely designed graphic of Rey and R2-D2 on Ahch-To, which features the Millennium Falcon in the background, or go for something a little more simple — a red case with the Star Wars logo on the back. Other designs include a graphic of Darth Vader, a stormtrooper, and the adorable BB-8 droid.

The cases themselves are available for the iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 8, and iPhone 8 Plus — sorry iPhone X users, you’ll have to stick with something else for now. The smaller cases for the iPhone 7 and iPhone 8 come in at $45, while the larger ones, built for the iPhone 7 Plus and iPhone 8 Plus, cost $10 more at $55. That’s a solid chunk of change for a phone case — but the Star Wars branding and the good reputation of Otterbox may make it worth it for many people.

The Otterbox Symmetry Series has been around for some time now, and doesn’t just feature the new Star Wars cases. The series is built to offer a ton of drop protection while still remaining relatively true to your phone’s profile. This is an Otterbox — so don’t expect the most sleek cases out there — but at least you can rest assured that your phone is relatively protected. The already-available Otterbox Symmetry Series offers a pretty massive range of options, and it extends beyond iPhones to include the Samsung Galaxy S7, Galaxy S7 Edge, Galaxy S8, and Galaxy S8 Plus. In keeping with the Disney theme, Otterbox offers Mickey and Minnie Mouse cases, as well as plain cases for those that want something a little more subtle.

You can get the new Otterbox Symmetry Series Star Wars cases for yourself from the Otterbox website. As mentioned, they’ll cost $45 to $55, depending on your iPhone model.




Android Oreo soak test for Moto Z and Z2 Force begins in Brazil

Some of the readers over at AndroidPIT Brazil have been notified via email to participate in a survey to apply as candidates to test an early build of Android Oreo for the Moto Z and Moto Z2 Force. The readers that were notified were signed up for Motorola’s testing program called the “Motorola Feedback Network”.

There’s no word as to when the public release of Android Oreo will begin to hit Moto Z’s and Moto Z2 Force’s everywhere, as the selection process for testers is still underway.Android PIT Brazil reports the possibility that the first beta build could come as early as “within 48 hours”.

3dfce_gsmarena_002 Android Oreo soak test for Moto Z and Z2 Force begins in BrazilSource: Android PIT BR

Speculation suggests that Motorola could launch the Android Oreo update from the third week of December onwards.

The gist of the email: those invited were notified to take the survey on a computer, as some of the questions require entry of data from (presumably) various areas of the phone’s settings.

Source (Translated)

How to force close apps on the iPhone X

Force closing or quitting an app on iOS is, according to Apple at least, never really necessary. Still, some like to keep a tidy multitasking view. And let’s face it, there are times when an app has to be force closed because it’s simply stopped working. 

Without a home button on the iPhone X ($999.00 at Apple), there are some new gestures you’ll need to learn to get around your new phone. Multitasking and closing an app are a couple of those gestures. Let’s take a look. 

62c23_multitasking-iphone-x How to force close apps on the iPhone X


Jason Cipriani/CNET

To force close an app on the iPhone X, swipe up from the bottom and leave your finger on the screen about halfway up to activate multitasking mode.

62c23_multitasking-iphone-x How to force close apps on the iPhone X


Jason Cipriani/CNET

Next, long press on any of the app previews until a red circle shows up in the top-left corner.

You now have two options to close apps: Tap on the circle, or swipe up on the app previews. And, yes, you can still close more than one app at a time.

SSM Health to cut 1 percent of job force – Channel3000.com – WISC

18f4e_placeholder-16x9 SSM Health to cut 1 percent of job force - Channel3000.com - WISC



MADISON, Wis. – A major health care provider in Dane County is cutting its workforce, a company spokeswoman said Thursday. 

SSM Health spokeswoman Kim Sveum said in a statement that it will have to let go about one percent of its workers. The system employs 35,000 workers system-wide across four states, Sveum said. That means about 350 positions will be cut. 

“Like all health systems, we must continuously evaluate our operations to ensure we are providing services as efficiently and effectively as possible,”  Sveum said in a statement. “As a result, we have identified some operational improvements necessary to better meet the needs of those we serve.”

Sveum said where possible, SSM Health would work to find the employees affected by the cuts comparable positions within the company.  

The SSM Health network, which is based in St. Louis, includes St. Mary’s Hospitals in Madison and Janesville, Dean Medical Group and more.

Is the internet ultimately a force for good or evil?

I mostly hate the internet. But the outrage and debate that has arisen in the wake of the Weinstein allegations couldn’t have happened without it. That has to be a good thing, right?

Hey. I mostly hate the internet, too. And until this business with Weinstein, I have mostly hated the internet for the way in which it enables certain kinds of debate. Some extraordinary benefits are coming out of the Weinstein revelations, mostly obviously the sense of collective strength derived from the testimony of so many women. But in terms of the systems via which it has emerged, I’m not sure this scandal entirely changes the game.

Let’s try to break it down. It is generally agreed that, apart from negating the need to ever leave one’s house, the main benefit of the internet has been social connectivity: specifically, uniting special and marginalized interest groups in ways that amplifies their voices and gives them a seat at the table. Such is the situation with Weinstein.

The power of women’s voices has be overwhelmingly, gratifyingly raised these past weeks, as women of all ages and demographics feel emboldened to step forward to share their stories of sexual harassment. For what feels like the first time in history, the sheer bloody numbers – teetering towards the universal – have been viscerally felt. It’s like a miraculous release after decades, centuries, millennia of bullshit.

Of course, “special and marginalized interest groups” also include people whose special interests don’t align with one’s own. The Ku Klux Klan is a special interest group, as are dungeon-dwelling trolls. The internet is not a subtle instrument. It promotes broad strokes over nuanced ones. It rewards outrage. In the case of Weinstein and his ilk, social media is a way of leveling the playing field between men of immense wealth and power, and the rest of us, and in this instance, the outrage is warranted. But it might be worth considering the mechanisms via which that outrage is expressed, and understand that if those mechanisms are being strengthened, there are potentially negative as well as positive implications.

I’m talking about “public shaming”, whereby individual transgressors are rounded on by potentially huge numbers of people online, in some cases on the basis of scant evidence, and for recreational as well as legitimate reasons. The dissemination of spreadsheets aggregating unsubstantiated allegations against scores of men – which inevitably get leaked – is strongly cathartic given the total lack of interest most institutions have shown over the years in rooting out sexual harassers. But it is not a foundation on which to base policy change.

Obviously, changing perception is a necessary precursor to changing policy; just look at the history of gay rights legislation. And I don’t hold with the idea that highlighting “trivial” acts of sexism undermines those at the “serious” end. It is all part of a continuum under-girded by the same, misogynistic presumptions.



It’s great to see women, and men, speaking out against alleged harassers. But is ‘lived experience’ shutting others out of the debate? Photograph: Murdo Macleod for the Guardian

What makes me nervous is the unvarying pitch in which some of these things are discussed; the appetite for vengeance is one I understand well, but to indulge it doesn’t usually end well. It seems to me un-ideal to put forces into effect whereby the “punishment” – exposure online, to potentially huge audiences – makes no distinction between a serial rapist and a guy who asks a woman out one time too many. It is right that both of these things should be considered wrong, and tackled, but to make no distinction in how that happens is absurd.

There is something else I can’t quite put my finger on and that is the promotion of “lived experience” over all other considerations. Historically, victims of sexual assault have been made only to feel shame, and it is a blessed relief to see women, and men, come forward to reclaim the status with something like pride. I suppose my concern is that when personal experience becomes the only, or at least the main source of authority for those participating in any given debate, it narrows the issue, potentially shutting out those who might otherwise join in and creating a strangely insular climate. In this instance, this is probably vastly outweighed by the benefits of people speaking out. But it is something to be aware of.

If we hold it to be true that social media, and the idea of public shaming, is a dangerous dynamic that cuts both ways, the more we should hesitate to use it. You could say that in the Weinstein case, all that is happening is that the power of social media is finally being harnessed to a just cause, rather than directed at someone who threw a V-sign in front of a war grave or made a bad joke that didn’t land well on Twitter.

But this isn’t adequate. If the mechanism itself is faulty, then we should surely retain some scintilla of scepticism about it, irrespective of the cause it promotes. Given inadequacies in the criminal justice system; given the hopelessness of institutions (and individual men) to self-regulate, and given the way in which sexual harassment has never been taken remotely seriously by those with the power to stop it, then, yes, I think what’s going on right now can only be a good thing.

But we have to be conscious of what we are strengthening when we use these dynamics as a bypass, or supplement, to the official mechanisms of justice. They are very blunt, and they are very, very hard to control.

Star Wars: Jedi Challenges review — The Force is strong in AR

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Law Tightening Internet Restrictions Comes Into Force In Russia

 Law Tightening Internet Restrictions Comes Into Force In Russia

 Law Tightening Internet Restrictions Comes Into Force In Russia

By RFE/RL

A controversial law tightening restrictions on the Internet comes in force in Russia on November 1, months ahead of a March 2018 election that is widely expected to hand President Vladimir Putin a new six-year term.

The law signed by Putin on July 29 prohibits the use of Internet proxy services including virtual private networks (VPNs).

The law was promoted by lawmakers who said it was needed to prevent the spread of extremist material and ideas.

Critics say Putin’s government often uses such arguments to justify the suppression of dissent.

Under the law, Internet providers will be ordered to block websites that offer VPNs and other proxy services. Russians frequently use such websites to access blocked content by routing connections through servers abroad.

Another Internet law that Putin signed the same day comes into force on January 1. It will require operators of instant messaging services, such as messenger apps, to establish the identity of those using the services by their phone numbers.

That law will also require operators to restrict access to users upon the request of the authorities if the users are disseminating content deemed illegal in Russia.

Russian authorities in recent years have escalated efforts to prosecute Internet users for online content deemed extremist or insulting to religious believers.

By RFE/RL

Internet loses it as Dodgers rally past Astros, force Game 7

  • 1c948_920x920 Internet loses it as Dodgers rally past Astros, force Game 7

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Browse through the photos for the best reactions to Game 6 of the World Series. 

Source: Twitter

Browse through the photos for the best reactions to Game 6 of the World Series. 


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This World Series between the Houston Astros and Los Angeles Dodgers has been pretty great, but I’m starting to have concerns for everyone’s mental health/emotional well-being.  

How y’all doing out there — holding up OK?

This has been a pretty stressful few days — regardless of who you are rooting for — but it is important to remember that it’s just baseball and if it gets too intense for you, just know there is always a part of the internet that is watching exactly what you’re watching, just to make fun of it. 


Tuesday’s Game 6 of the 2017 World Series didn’t have as much offense as Game 5 did, but the drama was there just the same.

Justin Verlander seemed untouchable on the mound for the Astros, but it all fell apart in the sixth inning and the Dodgers eventually closed out the game for a 3-1 win to force a Game 7 Wednesday night. 

The Astros offense was absent, except for a solo home run from George Springer which gave Houston a 1-0 lead in the top of the third. 

If Houston hopes to win its first World Series, it will need to give Lance McCullers much more run support on Wednesday. 

Browse through the photos above for the best reactions from Game 6 of the World Series. 

Law Tightening Internet Restrictions Comes Into Force In Russia

A controversial law tightening restrictions on the Internet comes in force in Russia on November 1, months ahead of a March 2018 election that is widely expected to hand President Vladimir Putin a new six-year term.

The law signed by Putin on July 29 prohibits the use of Internet proxy services including virtual private networks (VPNs).

The law was promoted by lawmakers who said it was needed to prevent the spread of extremist material and ideas.

Critics say Putin’s government often uses such arguments to justify the suppression of dissent.

Under the law, Internet providers will be ordered to block websites that offer VPNs and other proxy services. Russians frequently use such websites to access blocked content by routing connections through servers abroad.

Another Internet law that Putin signed the same day comes into force on January 1. It will require operators of instant messaging services, such as messenger apps, to establish the identity of those using the services by their phone numbers.

That law will also require operators to restrict access to users upon the request of the authorities if the users are disseminating content deemed illegal in Russia.

Russian authorities in recent years have escalated efforts to prosecute Internet users for online content deemed extremist or insulting to religious believers.

States lose push to force Trump to restart health subsidies

A U.S. judge on Wednesday rejected a request from 18 states and the District of Columbia to force the Trump administration to resume paying “Obamacare” subsidies right away and scolded the coalition for claiming health care costs would rise without federal help.

State attorneys general, all Democrats and led by Xavier Becerra of California, argued that the monthly payments are required under former President Barack Obama’s health care law and cutting them off will harm consumers. The payments reimburse insurers for providing lower-income people with discounts on out-of-pocket costs.

U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria, an Obama appointee, said the states had devised workarounds to the lost subsidies that would give millions of lower-income people even better health care options.

That means the emergency order the states sought would be “counterproductive,” the judge said.

The states should stop “yelling about higher premiums” and “focus instead on communicating the message that they have devised a response … that will prevent harm to the large majority of people while in fact allowing millions of lower-income people to get a better deal on health insurance in 2018,” Chhabria said.

The states had asked Chhabria to order the government to keep making the payments while their lawsuit works its way through the courts, which will take months. Becerra said he will continue to press the case.

“The fight for affordable health care moves forward,” he said in a statement after the ruling. “The actions by the Trump Administration undermine critical payments that keep costs of health care affordable for working families.”

President Donald Trump announced earlier this month that he will cut off the payments, saying Obama’s law is imploding and criticizing the subsidies as insurance company bailouts. The White House says the government cannot legally continue paying them because there is no formal authorization from Congress.

The judge said in his ruling that the Trump administration had the stronger legal argument, though he cautioned that the question of whether Congress had permanently set aside money for the subsidies was “close and complicated.”

Chhabria hammered an attorney for the state of California at a hearing this week over how the change would affect consumers.

Gregory Brown, who represented California, said the decision was creating “uncertainty and chaos” that could lead insurance companies to opt out of the health law. Brown also said it would “spook consumers.”

Chhabria wasn’t buying the argument. He said California and other states had anticipated the subsidies would end and found a way to ensure consumers would not pay more for insurance.

The states limited the plans for which insurers could hike premiums and ensured that many people will get more tax credits for their health insurance purchases, the judge said.

In his ruling, Chhabria cited an October press release by California’s health care marketplace, which said the premiums of nearly four of five consumers will stay the same or decrease after surcharges tied to the lost subsidies are factored in. The judge said dozens of other states also have accounted for the end of the subsidies.

The payments reimburse insurers for the costs of lowering copays and deductibles, which they are required to do for low-income customers who buy coverage through the health care marketplaces created by Obama’s law.

The states joining California in the lawsuit are: Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia and Washington, along with the District of Columbia.

The Honest Ads Act would force Internet companies to change their disclosure practices by January 2018

The growing stream of reporting on and data about fake news, misinformation, partisan content, and news literacy is hard to keep up with. This weekly roundup offers the highlights of what you might have missed.

A bill to make Internet companies reveal who is paying for ads. U.S. Senators Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Mark Warner (D-VA), and John McCain (R-AZ) on Thursday announced the Honest Ads Act, which aims to increase the transparency of online political ads by forcing Internet companies to disclose who’s buying them. The full text of the bill is here. The Verge’s Colin Lecher explains:

The new bill, called the Honest Ads Act, would require companies like Facebook and Google to keep copies of political ads and make them publicly available. Under the act, the companies would also be required to release information on who those ads were targeted to, as well as information on the buyer and the rates charged for the ads. The new rules would bring disclosure rules more in line with how political ads are regulated in mediums like print and TV, and apply to any platform with more than 50 million monthly viewers. The companies would be required to keep and release data on anyone spending more than $500 on political ads in a year.

Surprise: Tech companies and political advertisers aren’t super excited. The New York Times’ Kenneth P. Vogel and Cecilia Kang run down how tech companies are “mobilizing an army of lobbyists and lawyers — including a senior adviser to Hillary Clinton’s campaign — to help shape proposed regulations.”

Axios’s Sara Fischer talked to ad buyers about concerns over privacy, loopholes, and bots:

“This is over-reaching and includes targeting information not supplied by broadcast or cable buyers,” says Jaime Bowers, a consultant who has managed ad buying for dozens of ad campaigns for Republican candidates and advocacy groups. “Digital ads are bought in a variety of different ways, and views on social are proprietary because so much goes into what you pay for a view. Targeting is highly specialized and proprietary for the agency, campaign and pollsters.”

If you’d like to get deeper into campaign finance disclosure, this paper by Hamsini Sridharan of political reform nonprofit MapLight and Ann Ravel, former Chair of the Federal Election Commission, “outlines a brief history of campaign finance disclosure in relation to the internet; examines trends in political advertising and campaigning online; and explains why additional regulation is necessary to ensure transparency for political spending online while promoting democratic speech.”

“Our task was to set Americans against their own government.” Meduza, the Latvia-based Russian news outlet that recently partnered with BuzzFeed to do investigative Russia stories, writes about an interview conducted by the Russian independent news network Dozhd with a man who says he worked for Russia’s Internet Research Agency (IRA), “the ‘troll factory’ responsible for buying ads on social media and polluting American online news discussion in an apparent effort to destabilize U.S. democracy,’” between 2014 and 2015 (before Donald Trump even announced his candidacy).

Max says that IRA staff were tasked with monitoring tens of thousands of comments on major U.S. media outlets, in order to grasp the general trends of American Internet users. Once employees got a sense of what Americans naturally discussed in comment forums and on social media, their job was to incite them further and try to ‘rock the boat.’

According to Max, the Internet Research Agency’s foreign desk was prohibited from promoting anything about Russia or Putin. One thing the staff learned quickly was that Americans don’t normally talk about Russia: ‘They don’t really care about it,’ Max told Dozhd. ‘Our goal wasn’t to turn the Americans toward Russia,’ he claims. ‘Our task was to set Americans against their own government: to provoke unrest and discontent, and to lower Obama’s support ratings.’…

A separate ‘Analytics desk’ would supposedly supply his department with Excel files containing hyperlinks to news stories and short summaries of how to comment on these articles, in order to incite American Internet users and derail political discussions.

Defining “disinformation.” A brief from the nonprofit National Endowment for Democracy delves into what disinformation is, especially in light of Russian activities.

Analysts generally agree that disinformation is always purposeful and not necessarily composed of outright lies or fabrications. It can be composed of mostly true facts, stripped of context or blended with falsehoods to support the intended message, and is always part of a larger plan or agenda. In the Russian context, observers have described its use to pursue Moscow’s foreign policy goals through a “4D” offensive: dismiss an opponent’s claims or allegations, distort events to serve political purposes, distract from one’s own activities, and dismay those who might otherwise oppose one’s goals.

Take that, New York Times. WikiTribune, the crowdfunded news platform from Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, posted its “list of preferred news sources.” At the top are three “preferred news sources,” “which do not require specific attribution beyond the hyperlink to the original source”: The AP, Reuters, and The BBC. The B-grade news sources — which “we’re comfortable linking to for hard news but which require attribution in addition to the hyperlink” — are The New York Times, Washington Post, Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, The Economist, Axios, Quartz, BuzzFeed Investigations, The New Yorker, The Guardian, Politico, Bloomberg, and Nature. WikiTribune says it will expand the list over time.

6b62b_stem-misinformation The Honest Ads Act would force Internet companies to change their disclosure practices by January 2018

Apple iPhone 8 – There’s a new way to Force Restart your device, here’s how to do it

The and iPhone 8 Plus brings with it a load of new and exciting features for those looking to upgrade their Apple smartphone.

From the True Tone display, to wireless charging, to the Plus’s great Portrait mode, iPhone users have plenty of new features to get to grips with.

One change that may have gone under the radar though for iPhone users is the new way to Force Restart a device.

Last year Apple changed the long-standing method for how to Force Restart with the iPhone 7.

Previously, with models such as the iPhone 4, 4S, 5, 5S, 6 and 6S, users would need to hold the Home Button and Sleep/Wake to perform a Force Restart.

This was switched up with the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, with users instead needing to hold the Sleep/Wake button as well as the Volume Down button.

This shake-up of how to Force Restart your iPhone came as Apple dropped the physical home button for a solid-state one.

And with the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus Apple have once again changed how you need to perform a Force Restart, 9to5Mac reported.

If you try to perform the iPhone 7’s Force Restart method on the iPhone 8 or 8 Plus, you’ll end up activating the emergency SOS feature.

So, to make sure you don’t end up activating this by mistake, Express.co.uk will walk you through how to Force Restart your iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus.

iPhone 8 tips: How to force restart, enter recovery, and DFU mode

43dca_59cbb6e1e4b0fe6fc5655eff-1280x7201oct062017171019poster iPhone 8 tips: How to force restart, enter recovery, and DFU mode

Video: Your iPhone X or iPhone 8 won’t charge fast unless you buy this for it

With the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, Apple has changed the way that you carry out a forced restart, enter recovery mode, and enter DFU mode.

Must read: Here’s why your old iPhone feels slow — and what you can do about it

On the iPhone 7 you pressed the volume down button at the same time as the sleep/wake button to restart the handset. However, if you try this on the iPhone 8 you’ll get quite a surprise because this will activate the Emergency SOS mode, and just before the handset makes a call to the emergency services it emits several ear-piercing siren blasts!

So how do you force a restart?

With the iPhone 8 you have to tap the volume up button followed by tapping the volume down button (a tap means pressing and then letting go), and then you press and hold the side button (Apple’s new name for the sleep/wake button) until you see the Apple logo on the screen.

Yes, that is long-winded, and can be hard to pull off if you have an iPhone 8 Plus or small hands. I suggest putting the iPhone down on a table to do this.

But what about entering recovery mode?

To do this first plug a Lightning cable into the iPhone that’s connected to a PC or Mac running iTunes. Now you tap the volume up button followed by tapping the volume down button, then you press and hold the side button and keep pressing when you see the Apple logo on the screen and don’t let go until you see the connect to iTunes logo appear.

43dca_59cbb6e1e4b0fe6fc5655eff-1280x7201oct062017171019poster iPhone 8 tips: How to force restart, enter recovery, and DFU mode

DFU (Device Firmware Upgrade) mode is even more long-winded to get into. Again, start by connecting the iPhone to a PC or Mac running iTunes. Now you tap the volume up button followed by tapping the volume down button, then you press and hold the side button for 10 seconds, at this point press and hold the volume down button without letting go of the side button for another 5 seconds, after which point you release the side button and continue holding the volume down button for another 10 seconds. The goal is to get the device into a state where the screen is black (no Apple or iTunes logo) and iTunes identifies the iPhone as being in recovery mode.

To get out of recovery mode or DFU mode you basically carry out a restart, so you tap the volume up button followed by tapping the volume down button, and then you press and hold the side button until you see the Apple logo on the screen.


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43dca_59cbb6e1e4b0fe6fc5655eff-1280x7201oct062017171019poster iPhone 8 tips: How to force restart, enter recovery, and DFU mode


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