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Chrome 64 Brings Stricter Pop-Up Blocker, Tuned Autoplay Controls and HDR Video For Windows 10

83d1d_chromebeta64 Chrome 64 Brings Stricter Pop-Up Blocker, Tuned Autoplay Controls and HDR Video For Windows 10
Chrome 63 for desktop is barely out of the box but the latest version of Chrome Beta has delivered some updates that are worth chatting about. Version 64.0.3282.24 for Windows, Linux and Mac began rolling out to users on Beta on Thursday with a large number of new features including the next stop on Google’s Autoplay roadmap.

Here are some highlights of what to expect from the upcoming version of Chrome.

Enhanced Pop-Up Blocker

This one feature alone would be enough to make Chrome Beta my default browser if I weren’t on a Chromebook. Google continues its attack on intrusive advertising by cracking down on deceptive site links that result in a user unknowingly opening a new page.

Disguised buttons, misleading overlays and ambiguous site controls are all targeted with this update. When Chrome detects that these types of links are attempting to open a new page, it blocks the action and that is a beautiful thing.

Site-wide Audio Muting

Google’s Autoplay roadmap was laid out with the intention of not only providing users more control over what media plays when browsing but also to give developers a more consistent method of what media is triggered when the Chrome browser lands on a given page.

With the latest update, site-wide audio muting will now appear in the drop-down menu of the URL bars site settings. Additionally, developers can customize which media is set to autoplay on their sites. The end goal will be a less intrusive web experience that will hopefully help preserve battery life on your device.

HDR Video on Windows 10

For Windows users, Chrome 64 now supports HDR video playback granted you have all the pieces to the puzzle. First, you must have the Windows 10 Fall Creator Update and of course, have a device with a graphics card and display that will support HDR.

Users will also need to enable HDR mode in the Windows display settings. Developers can learn more about HDR site content for Chrome here.

ResizeObserver

Generally speaking, CSS elements on a website are affected globally when the viewport of the page is resized. ResizeObserver gives developers an API that allows specific elements on a page to be manipulated on an individual basis.

Check out a basic example of how this works here.

Chrome 64 also includes the next step in Linux notifications and a cart-full of developer updates. See the full list at the Chromium Blog.

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Google Chrome 64 Beta adds HDR support on Windows 10, improved security and site-wide audio muting capabilities

Google Chrome 64 Beta has arrived and brings with it a handful of interesting new features.

384db_ezgif-5-e9331e7511 Google Chrome 64 Beta adds HDR support on Windows 10, improved security and site-wide audio muting capabilities

Google Chrome 64 beta brings with it several new security features

For a start, the browser now supports site-wide audio muting, a setting that will let you mute an entire site rather than a specific tab. This will be very useful for those pesky sites that have auto-playing audio ads in every page.

Speaking of ads, an improved pop-up blocker will now better handle unwanted pop-ups, and malicious auto-redirects will also be disabled. Third-party content in iframes will no longer be visible unless a user interacts with it.

The browser will better support native notification centres as well, this includes those in Windows 10 and Linux. As 9to5Google notes, the feature is already supported in macOS.

Interestingly, the beta browser will detect when Windows 10 is in HDR mode (high-dynamic range) and will automatically render HDR-ready video content if supported. Obviously, you’ll need a compatible display and accompanying hardware for this to work, but this is certainly good news for those of you who have HDR TVs and displays.

Another feature is the inclusion of split-view multitasking for tablets and, according to 9to5Google, a “Resize Observer API” that will help developers test and build more responsive sites.

Chrome 64 Enters Beta Channel, Brings Better Security Features, Resize Observer API, and Windows 10 HDR

The version 63 of Chrome recently started rolling out to various platforms such as Android, Mac, Linux, and Windows. Now, Chrome 64 beta has begun rolling out for the users. This version that is currently in beta channel brings better pop-up blocker, sitewide audio muting, and overall new features including the ones found on Chrome OS.

First off, the version brings support for HDR video playback for Windows 10 HDR mode. To use this feature, the system requirements include Windows 10 Fall Creator Update, HDR compatible display and graphics card. On Windows, Google is also working on bringing support for a native notification center, which became available for macOS in Chrome 59 and debuting on Linux with Chrome 64.

8441e_chrome-63-for-android-86x60 Chrome 64 Enters Beta Channel, Brings Better Security Features, Resize Observer API, and Windows 10 HDRRelated Chrome 63 Overhauls Security and Redesigns Bookmark Manager On Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS

Resize Observer API

With Chrome 64, developers will now be able to use the Resize Observer API that will help them in building responsive websites offering “finer control to observe changes to sizes of elements on a page.”

Enhanced security features

Rest of the new features debuting with Chrome 64 are mainly focussed on the security aspect of the ecosystem. The enhanced pop-up blocker puts a security veil on the system by blocks abusive sites from opening a new window/tab. With abusive websites, we refer to the websites that put page elements like play button that do not play anything other than triggering ads opening in a window.

Other security integrations in Chrome 64 include measures that block ill-disposed auto-redirects from certain websites. For making this security measure work, Chrome 64 will prevent redirect from third-party web pages. Besides, the browser will also be blocking third-part iFrames if the user has not allowed it. Regarding pop-up blocking on Chrome 64, in case of malicious redirects, the browser will keep the user on the same web page and show the pop-up blocking activity in the information bar that will be visible during pop-ups.

Chrome 64 also brings sitewide audio muting setting that will enable users to block audio from certain websites. The new option to block audio will be available in the permissions drop-down when users click on the green lock in the URL bar.

8441e_chrome-63-for-android-86x60 Chrome 64 Enters Beta Channel, Brings Better Security Features, Resize Observer API, and Windows 10 HDRRelated Chrome 63 Enters Stable Channel – Rolling Out to Windows, macOS and Linux with New Features 37 Security Fixes

New features coming to Chrome OS with Chrome 64

On Chrome OS, this version brings “Split view” feature that enhances multitasking in tablet mode. The Split View can be enabled via a flag. Moreover, taking screenshots on Chrome OS also becomes streamlined with Android i.e. using volume down and power key combination to take a screenshot.

As we mentioned in the beginning, Chrome 64 is currently in beta channel and will soon enter the stable channel, roughly in a few weeks.

Chrome 64 beta adds stronger pop-up blocker, sitewide audio muting, Windows 10 HDR video

With version 63 rolling out on Mac, Windows, Linux, and Android, Chrome 64 is now in the beta channel. End users will particularly benefit from a stronger pop-up blocker, sitewide audio muting, and an assortment of other features, including those on Chrome OS.


2d806_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 64 beta adds stronger pop-up blocker, sitewide audio muting, Windows 10 HDR video

Nintendo Switch

An improved pop-up blocker in Chrome 64 prevents sites with abusive experiences — like disguising links as play buttons and site controls, or transparent overlays — from opening new tabs or windows.

Meanwhile, as announced in November, other security measures in Chrome will prevent malicious auto-redirects. Beginning in version 64, the browser will counter surprise redirects from third-party content embedded into pages. The browser now blocks third-party iframes unless a user has directly interacted with it.

When a redirect attempt occurs, users will remain on their current page with an infobar popping up to detail the block.

This version also adds a new sitewide audio muting setting. It will be accessible from the permissions dropdown by tapping the info icon or green lock in the URL bar.

This version also brings support for HDR video playback when Windows 10 is in HDR mode. It requires the Windows 10 Fall Creator Update, HDR-compatible graphics card, and display. Meanwhile, on Windows, Google is currently prototyping support for an operating system’s native notification center. It launched on macOS in version 59 and is coming to Linux with this version.

On Chrome OS, version 64 allows the “Split view” feature for improved multitasking in tablet mode to be enabled via a flag, while screenshots on convertibles are more like Android with a new volume down and power key gesture.

Lastly, developers can now take advantage of the Resize Observer API to build responsive sites with “finer control to observe changes to sizes of elements on a page.” Chrome 64 should hit the stable channel in a few weeks time.


Check out 9to5Google on YouTube for more news:

Chrome For Android Adds Parallel Download Capability

8513c_ChromeGetsFaster-1024x469 Chrome For Android Adds Parallel Download Capability
The Chrome browser for Android is adding a “parallel downloading” feature as a default function in the mobile browser in the upcoming release of version 64. The addition will result in presumably faster downloads, not in the form of accelerated Mbps but instead the ability to handle multiple downloads at once.

According to a recent commit in the Chromium repository, the parallel download feature will be enabled in Chrome 64 for Android but will only activate in the case of an initial download taking more than two seconds to complete.

Like many new features, the parallel download has already been tested in what is called a “finch experiment.” These are testing methods that take place on a small number of devices to test the stability of a new feature and give developers a real-life snapshot of said feature in action.

According to the commit, the finch experiment stems back to Chrome version 62. If I am reading it correctly, the parallel download feature is now being pushed to all users on Chrome version 62 and 63 in the form of the finch experiment and will be enabled as an actual feature when 64 lands in the coming weeks.

If this new feature is something you’re interested in but it doesn’t look to be enabled on your device, you can turn it on by heading to chrome://flags and searching for “parallel download.”

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Source: Chromium Repository

Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac …

Chrome 63 began rolling out to Android and desktop browsers last week with the usual security fixes and new developer features. On the latter platform, this update introduces Material Design to the Bookmark Manager.


3d2ae_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac ...

Nintendo Switch

Several versions ago, Google began updating various aspects of the browser with Material Design, including History, Downloads, and Settings.

Like the Flags page for enabling experiments and in-development features, which Google also revamped in version 63, the Bookmark Manager (Menu Bookmarks Bookmark Manager) adopts the standard Materials UI elements. This includes an app bar that houses a large search bar. It adopts the same dark blue theme and includes various Material animations and flourishes.

Meanwhile, the most significant change is the improved spacing for the bookmarks list and the navigation drawer of folders. Both use larger fonts and iconography for a significantly less cramped appearance that takes better advantage of larger screens. The increased spacing also applies to various menus for reordering bookmarks and creating new ones.

3d2ae_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac ... 3d2ae_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac ...

If there’s one complaint of the new design, some might not be a fan of the reduced information density. This new Material Bookmark Manager is available on Mac, Windows, Linux, and Chrome OS with it widely rolling out as of Chrome 63.

Chrome 62

3d2ae_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac ... 3d2ae_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac ...

Chrome 63

3d2ae_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac ... 3d2ae_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac ... 3d2ae_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac ...


Check out 9to5Google on YouTube for more news:

5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

Google Chrome comes as a default browser installed on most Android phones. It is fast, responsive and comes with all the basic features. The only thing it lacks is extensions which are available on Mozilla Firefox Android app.

Android app of Google Chrome has few hidden tricks up its sleeve that can enhance user experience. These are accessible from Settings within the app and through Chrome Flags.

Chrome Flags are hidden experimental settings in Android that will allow you to fine-tune your browser. You can try new features in Chrome while they are still in development or are unstable. It opens up a lot of possibilities both in desktop and mobile browsers by allowing you to change default settings.

However, Chrome wiki mentions that these experimental features may change, disappear or stop working at any time. Also, tweaking with unknown settings may compromise your device’s security.

If you find that your browser is crashing down or showing unexpected behavior after you have tempered with Flags, just go to app settings and clear data for Chrome. This will reset Chrome to its earlier state.

Also read: 8 Google Easter Eggs And Fun Tricks That You’d Love to Know

5 Hidden Tips And Tricks for Chrome On Android

1. Move the Address Bar to bottom

Are you not finding it convenient to access the Chrome address bar on your large screen device? Did you know you can change it? This hidden Google Chrome feature can be tweaked easily.

  • In your address bar type “chrome://flags” without the quotes.

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

 

  • Tap on the 3-dot-menu on the upper right corner of your browser and tap on Find in page.

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

  • In the search bar that appears, type “Chrome Home.”

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

  • You’ll notice that Chrome Home is highlighted in red.
  • Tap on the tab marked Default below it and set it to Enabled.

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

  • You will see a “Relaunch Now” pop-up. Tap on it. You may have to manually relaunch once again for changes to take effect.

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

After you relaunch, you will notice that the address bar is now shown on the bottom of the screen.

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

2. Experience faster browsing speeds.

You can speed up Chrome on Android by enabling QUIC protocol. ‘QUIC’ stands for Quick UDP Internet Connection and is an experimental process. QUIC operates over UDP and is much lower latency than TCP.

  • Type “chrome://flags” without the quotes in your address bar.
  • Search or scroll down to Experimental QUIC protocol.

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

  • Set it to Enabled.

With QUIC, Google says that mean page load times improve by about 3%. Also, users who used Youtube via QUIC reported having suffered from 30% fewer rebuffers.

3. Always ON Reader Mode

Websites loaded with ads and many banners can distract you and make it inconvenient to read content. That’s when Chrome’s Reader Mode comes into play. It strips off all other elements from a page except the content. Typically, a “Make page mobile-friendly” button is shown on some websites and clicking on it will highlight the content.

  • On the flags screen, search or scroll down to Reader Mode triggering.

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

  • Change it to Always, if you want to force every website to display content in Reader Mode.

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

4. Switch tabs in a compact way

There is a nifty trick for Chrome on Android to switch tabs. Chrome displays tabs like cards stacked over each other. In a scenario when many tabs are open, you may need a considerable amount of time in finding and switching to a tab. “Accessibility Tab Switcher” flag allows a user to switch tabs compactly by displaying only the names of tabs organized as a list.

  • Search or scroll down to Accessibility Tab Switcher and tap on Enable beneath it.

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

  • Then tap Relaunch Now.

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

You will notice that you can now visualize tabs more clearly without a preview of the content.

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

5. Enable Zooming on any website

Not all websites allow you to zoom in on their content. This can be frustrating when you have to tap on links or copy some text. Thankfully, Chrome on Android has a hidden trick to override this problem.

  • Tap on the 3-dot menu and tap on Settings from the drop-down menu.
  • Tap on Accessibility.

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

  • Check the option Force Enable Zoom.

27f12_a-min-576x1024 5 Hidden Tips and Tricks for Google Chrome On Android

Did you find these hidden tips and tricks for Google Chrome on Android to be useful? Share your reviews in the comments.

Also read: Amazing Google Chrome Tips And Tricks You Must Know

Chrome Android App To Receive Custom Download Folders

66015_4 Chrome Android App To Receive Custom Download Folders

Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS

Chrome 63 began rolling out to Android and desktop browsers last week with the usual security fixes and new developer features. On the latter platform, this update introduces Material Design to the Bookmark Manager.


bf426_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS

Nintendo Switch

Several versions ago, Google began updating various aspects of the browser with Material Design, including History, Downloads, and Settings.

Like the Flags page for enabling experiments and in-development features, which Google also revamped in version 63, the Bookmark Manager (Menu Bookmarks Bookmark Manager) adopts the standard Materials UI elements. This includes an app bar that houses a large search bar. It adopts the same dark blue theme and includes various Material animations and flourishes.

Meanwhile, the most significant change is the improved spacing for the bookmarks list and the navigation drawer of folders. Both use larger fonts and iconography for a significantly less cramped appearance that takes better advantage of larger screens. The increased spacing also applies to various menus for reordering bookmarks and creating new ones.

bf426_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS bf426_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS

If there’s one complaint of the new design, some might not be a fan of the reduced information density. This new Material Bookmark Manager is available on Mac, Windows, Linux, and Chrome OS with it widely rolling out as of Chrome 63.

Chrome 62

bf426_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS bf426_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS

Chrome 63

bf426_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS bf426_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS bf426_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS


Check out 9to5Google on YouTube for more news:

Chrome 64 for Android brings accelerated download speeds

Google recently pushed Chrome 63 out to the public, with its launch, version 64 was put onto the beta channel. According to one beady-eyed user over at XDA, Chrome 64 for Android will have a feature called parallel download in the flags menu, which, when enabled, will accelerate download speeds by creating parallel jobs to handle the download.

In the Chromium repository entitled ‘Enable parallel download feature of Android from M64’, it says:

“Enable Parallel download feature on Android from M64. We are currently pushing parallel download to 100% of users. This [commit log] enabled parallel download feature on Android from M64.”

It’s possible to give parallel downloads a test drive right now, simply grab the latest beta of Chrome for Android and search for ‘chrome-parallel-download’ in the chrome://flags menu, or simply type ‘chrome://flags#chrome-parallel-download’ into the URL bar to directly jump to the appropriate setting and enable it. Of course, take care not to mess around with other settings in the flags menu to avoid potentially breaking your browser.

The parallel download feature will kick in once a download takes longer than two seconds; when it does it’ll create three parallel jobs to speed up the download. For smaller downloads you probably won’t notice any sort of speed improvement, however, if you’re downloading larger files you should notice a difference.

Source: XDA Developers

Google Chrome for Android will soon support Custom Download Folders

The Google Chrome browser is based on the open source Chromium browser project, and thanks to its open source nature, it’s possible to follow any development on the browser right as it happens. We recently covered that Google Chrome for Android would be adding HDR video playback support after discovering a new commit in the Chromium gerrit. Today, we discovered that Google Chrome for Android is preparing to add a new feature: changing the default download folder.

Currently, all downloads from Google Chrome are stored in the /Downloads folder in /data/media/user. The folder can get quite cluttered since this folder is the shared default download folder for most applications. If your device is running low on storage or never had a lot of storage space available, then you may have wanted to change Chrome’s download folder to your device’s SD card (if you have one).

Such a basic feature has existed on the desktop version of Google Chrome, but it’s finally making its way over to the Android version. We discovered a commit in the Chromium gerrit bringing this feature. It was recently merged, and the flag to enable the feature can be found in the latest nightly build of Chromium. You can directly access the flag by copying and pasting this line into Chrome’s address bar:

chrome://flags#enable-downloads-location-change

The flag says “enable changing default downloads storage location on Android.” I enabled it on my device but was unable to find where the default download folder could be changed in Chrome’s settings. Looking back at the commit, it appears that the feature is still a work in progress as the commit simply adds a flag but it doesn’t actually implement the logic for changing the download directory. The commit that adds the relevant preference in settings has yet to be merged, so it may be a few days until this feature is usable on Chrome for Android builds, and it’ll take even longer for it to make its way to the stable or beta branches of Chrome.

Chrome 63 vs Windows 10 Edge: Google steps up rivalry with site …

69ea2_5a09aaa160b2a3d340901db2-1280x7201nov152017125857poster Chrome 63 vs Windows 10 Edge: Google steps up rivalry with site ...

Google’s latest effort to pry businesses odd Internet Explorer and keep them away from Windows 10 Edge is a new security feature called site isolation, which handles each page in its own process.

With the release of Chrome 63, enterprise admins will be able to configure Chrome to render content for each site in its own dedicated process.

According to Google, keeping each site isolated from other sites in Chrome offers enterprises the strongest security. The technique is designed to thwart attacks that exploit vulnerabilities in the renderer process to run malicious code inside Chrome’s render sandbox and steal information.

However, it does come with a significant overhead, bumping up Chrome’s memory usage on PCs by between 10 and 20 percent.

Chrome’s optional, per-site isolation comes as Microsoft continues to harden Windows 10 Edge using hardware-based virtualization through tools such as Windows Defender Application Guard (WDAG), which allow Edge to run in an isolated hardware environment.

In October, Microsoft said that WDAG marked a major breakthrough in sandbox technology since it offers a shield against attacks on the kernel, which is unprotected if an attack escapes the browser sandbox.

The good news for end-users is that Google and Microsoft are competing fiercely on the security front, adopting different approaches to protect against new attacks.

69ea2_5a09aaa160b2a3d340901db2-1280x7201nov152017125857poster Chrome 63 vs Windows 10 Edge: Google steps up rivalry with site ...

With Chrome 63, businesses can also configure policies to restrict access to extensions based on the permissions required.


Image: Google

The one-site-per-process feature has been an equally important project for Chrome. Justin Schuh, engineering lead for Chrome security, earlier this year said site isolation was the biggest difference in Google’s approach to security and would make it superior Microsoft’s new Edge defenses. The technology promises to prevent remote code execution inside Chrome’s renderer sandbox.

Admins can choose to turn on Chrome’s site isolation for all sites or select a list of websites to isolate to run in their own rendering process. Google suggests including sites that users log into and important sites such as productivity site or intranet.

Chrome now also offers admins the ability to set a policy that blocks access to extensions based on the permissions they require.

This feature adds to the ability to whitelist and blacklist certain Chrome extensions. Admins have a large selection of permissions to block, including audio capture, USB, and video capture.

Additionally, Chrome 63 introduces Transport Layer Security version 1.3, which is enabled for Gmail in the updated browser.

Google is bringing NTLMv2 support to Mac, Linux, Android and Chrome OS. NTLM or NT LAN Manager is a Microsoft authentication protocol for Windows.

Chrome 64, due out in early 2018, includes support for NTLMv2 and Extended Protection for Authentication. Chrome’s support for non-Windows platforms brings Chrome on these to the same level as Chrome on Windows.

The company will also offer admins some leeway on an incoming crackdown on antivirus software that injects code into Chrome processes. Google argues that this is an outdated process that causes crashes.

Chrome warnings will advise users to uninstall the antivirus. It is encouraging vendors to use other methods, such as Chrome extensions and Native Messaging. Starting with Chrome 66 in April 2018, users may see a notification to update or remove the offending application.

To cater to business, Google will offer a new policy that gives admins extended support for critical apps that need to inject code into Chrome to function.

Finally, Chrome 63 includes fixes for 37 vulnerabilities. Google paid researchers $46,174 for reporting the Chrome bugs, including an award to Microsoft’s Offensive Security Research Team.

Previous and related coverage

Google will lock down Chrome on Windows

Does the Chrome web browser crash on you in Windows? Google plans on fixing a common cause for these problems.

Five tricks to make Google Chrome faster and better

Here are five tricks to help you speed up your browser and increase your productivity.

Top Google Chrome extensions to enhance your productivity, security, and performance

If you are a Google Chrome user and you’re not making use of extensions, then you are really missing out. Here is a selection of extensions aimed specifically at boosting your productivity and privacy.

Read more on Google

Chrome 63 Now Available for Android, Linux, Mac, and Windows: What’s New

Google Chrome’s latest software update, version 63, is now rolling out to all users on desktop (Linux, Mac, Windows) and mobile (Android), with updates for Chrome OS to follow shortly.

Chrome 63 brings with it a ton of new features for both desktop and mobile platforms. The highlighting features for both platforms include Flags redesign, Quick Site Certificate, and a new Device Memory Javascript API. On the other hand, Chrome for Android Oreo adds features like Smart Text Selection and a new modal Permissions dialog.

Flags redesign

The chrome://flags webpage gets a facelift with the new Material Design that helps users distinguish between Available and Unavailable in-development Chrome experiments. The feature has been previously used to enable and disable these beta experiments on the Web browser. There is also a new Search bar and a quick button to reset all experiments in one go.

Device Memory JavaScript API

This feature has been added to help users on low-RAM devices. The API automatically detects the amount of memory in the device and can redirect to lite versions of websites in cases of high RAM usage; a great step in improving user experience. Chrome has been infamous, in the past, for consuming more RAM than other major Web browsers.

Site Isolation

This is an interesting new feature that takes forward the work of Google’s sandbox technology. Chrome 63 now lets you isolate certain webpages; content from them is rendered separately making sure that these pages do not share processes or cross-site iframes. This, obviously, comes at a cost: high memory usage. Google estimates that it will be 10-20 percent more than usual.

TLS 1.3 Rollout

TLS or Transport Layer Security is a protocol that configures secure communications for Gmail. The last update for TLS, version 1.2, came back in 2008, and Chrome 63 finally brings the latest in email security after a nine-year wait.

Smart Text Selection

Rolled out with Android 8.0 Oreo, Smart Text Selection is finally a feature in Chrome 63 for Android. Smart Text Selection recommends apps to users based on the text they select in any document, email or webpage. While the use case might be different from user to user, it is a really handy feature to have.

Chrome 63 will be available on your respective desktop/ mobile device in the coming days.

Google Chrome 63 Released for Android, Linux, Mac, and Windows

Google has started rolling out version 63 of its Chrome browser for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android users. Most changes in this version address under-the-hood features and bring speed improvements and better support for web standards.

Here is a short list of some of the most important changes made in the Chrome 63 release:

▬ Google has redesigned the chrome://flags section.
▬ Chrome now lets you mute sites forever.
▬ FTP links are now marked as insecure.
▬ Chrome now shows warnings against MitM attacks.
▬ Chrome now uses better site isolation.
▬ Chrome now comes with a Device Memory API that lets developers better understand how Chrome and websites use a PC’s memory.
▬ Chrome now supports the Generic Sensors API, which exposes the following sensors to websites: Accelerometer, LinearAccelerationSensor, Gyroscope, AbsoluteOrientationSensor, and RelativeOrientationSensor.
Version 2 of NT LAN Manager (NTLM) API is now shipped, enabling applications to authenticate remote users and provide session security when requested by the application.
▬ Changes to how Chrome asks for user permissions, which has resulted in the decrease of the overall number of permission prompts by 50%.
▬ Developers can now make pixel-level adjustments using the new Q length unit, which is especially useful on small viewports.
▬ Developers can now prevent apps from using Chrome’s pull-to-refresh feature or create custom effects using overscroll-behavior, which allows changing the browser’s behavior once the scroller has reached its full extent.
font-variant-east-asian is now supported, allowing developers to control the usage of alternate glyphs for East Asian languages like Japanese and Chinese.
▬ Chrome can now load JavaScript modules based on runtime conditions. It previously supported only static JavaScript module loading.
▬ Chrome now includes a new mechanism for handling code that generates or iterates through data via asynchronous functions.
▬ To improve interoperability, Chrome will fire beforeprint and afterprint events as part of the printing standard, allowing developers to to annotate the printed copy and edit the annotation after the printing command is done executing.

Other changes are detailed in the official Chrome 63 changelog, here.

Security fixes, galore!

As for security fixes, Google engineers fixed 37 issues since Chrome 62. Below are the issues reported by external researchers, and by Google in-house engineers.

Chrome 63 vs Windows 10 Edge: Google steps up rivalry with site isolation security

1ba91_chromeenterpriseupdates01-max-1000x1000 Chrome 63 vs Windows 10 Edge: Google steps up rivalry with site isolation security

With Chrome 63, businesses can also configure policies to restrict access to extensions based on the permissions required.


Google

Google’s latest effort to pry businesses off Internet Explorer and keep them away from Windows 10 Edge is a new security feature called site isolation, which handles each page in its own process.

With the release of Chrome 63, enterprise admins will be able to configure Chrome to render content for each site in its own dedicated process.

As Google notes, keeping each site isolated from other sites in Chrome offers enterprises the strongest security. The technique is designed to thwart attacks that exploit vulnerabilities in the renderer process to run malicious code inside Chrome’s render sandbox and steal information.

However, it does come with a significant overhead, bumping up Chrome’s memory usage on PCs by between 10 and 20 percent.

Chrome’s optional, per-site isolation comes as Microsoft continues to harden Windows 10 Edge using hardware-based virtualization through tools such as Windows Defender Application Guard (WDAG), which allow Edge to run in an isolated hardware environment.

In October, Microsoft argued that WDAG marked a major breakthrough in sandbox technology since it offers a shield against attacks on the kernel, which is unprotected if an attack escapes the browser sandbox.

The good news for end-users is that Google and Microsoft are competing fiercely on the security front, adopting different approaches to protect against new attacks.

The one-site-per-process feature has been an equally important project for Chrome. Justin Schuh, engineering lead for Chrome security, earlier this year said site isolation was the biggest difference in Google’s approach to security and would make it superior Microsoft’s new Edge defenses. The technology promises to prevent remote code execution inside Chrome’s renderer sandbox.

Admins can choose to turn on Chrome’s site isolation for all sites or select a list of websites to isolate to run in their own rendering process. Google suggests including sites that users log into and important sites such as productivity site or intranet.

Chrome now also offers admins the ability to set a policy that blocks access to extensions based on the permissions they require.

This feature adds to the ability to whitelist and blacklist certain Chrome extensions. Admins have a large selection of permissions to block, including audio capture, USB, and video capture.

Additionally, Chrome 63 introduces Transport Layer Security version 1.3, which is enabled for Gmail in the updated browser.

Google is bringing NTLMv2 support to Mac, Linux, Android and Chrome OS. NTLM or NT LAN Manager is a Microsoft authentication protocol for Windows.

Chrome 64, due out in early 2018, includes support for NTLMv2 and Extended Protection for Authentication. Chrome’s support for non-Windows platforms brings Chrome on these to the same level as Chrome on Windows.

The company will also offer admins some leeway on an incoming crackdown on antivirus software that injects code into Chrome processes. Google argues that this is an outdated process that causes crashes.

Chrome warnings will advise users to uninstall the antivirus. It is encouraging vendors to use other methods, such as Chrome extensions and Native Messaging. Starting with Chrome 66 in April 2018, users may see a notification to update or remove the offending application.

To cater to business, Google will offer a new policy that gives admins extended support for critical apps that need to inject code into Chrome to function.

Finally, Chrome 63 includes fixes for 37 vulnerabilities. Google paid researchers $46,174 for reporting the Chrome bugs, including an award to Microsoft’s Offensive Security Research Team.

Previous and related coverage

Google will lock down Chrome on Windows

Does the Chrome web browser crash on you in Windows? Google plans on fixing a common cause for these problems.

Five tricks to make Google Chrome faster and better

Here are five tricks to help you speed up your browser and increase your productivity.

Top Google Chrome extensions to enhance your productivity, security, and performance

If you are a Google Chrome user and you’re not making use of extensions, then you are really missing out. Here is a selection of extensions aimed specifically at boosting your productivity and privacy.

Chrome 63 Now Available for Android Linux, Mac, and Windows: What’s New

Google Chrome’s latest software update, version 63, is now rolling out to all users on desktop (Linux, Mac, Windows) and mobile (Android), with updates for Chrome OS to follow shortly.

Chrome 63 brings with it a ton of new features for both desktop and mobile platforms. The highlighting features for both platforms include Flags redesign, Quick Site Certificate, and a new Device Memory Javascript API. On the other hand, Chrome for Android Oreo adds features like Smart Text Selection and a new modal Permissions dialog.

Flags redesign

The chrome://flags webpage gets a facelift with the new Material Design that helps users distinguish between Available and Unavailable in-development Chrome experiments. The feature has been previously used to enable and disable these beta experiments on the Web browser. There is also a new Search bar and a quick button to reset all experiments in one go.

Device Memory JavaScript API

This feature has been added to help users on low-RAM devices. The API automatically detects the amount of memory in the device and can redirect to lite versions of websites in cases of high RAM usage; a great step in improving user experience. Chrome has been infamous, in the past, for consuming more RAM than other major Web browsers.

Site Isolation

This is an interesting new feature that takes forward the work of Google’s sandbox technology. Chrome 63 now lets you isolate certain webpages; content from them is rendered separately making sure that these pages do not share processes or cross-site iframes. This, obviously, comes at a cost: high memory usage. Google estimates that it will be 10-20 percent more than usual.

TLS 1.3 Rollout

TLS or Transport Layer Security is a protocol that configures secure communications for Gmail. The last update for TLS, version 1.2, came back in 2008, and Chrome 63 finally brings the latest in email security after a nine-year wait.

Smart Text Selection

Rolled out with Android 8.0 Oreo, Smart Text Selection is finally a feature in Chrome 63 for Android. Smart Text Selection recommends apps to users based on the text they select in any document, email or webpage. While the use case might be different from user to user, it is a really handy feature to have.

Chrome 63 will be available on your respective desktop/ mobile device in the coming days.

Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

It’s that time of the month again – Google has released a brand new version of Chrome for Android. We’re now up to version 63, which brings a few useful improvements and further changes to the in-development ‘Chrome Home’ interface.

Chrome Home

Google has been working on a major interface revamp for Chrome since October of last year, called ‘Chrome Home.’ It started to take shape in March, and then it was revamped again in August. Google started rolling it out with Chrome 62, but the vast majority of users are still on the old design by default.

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

Modern UI in Chrome 62

There are a few new flags in Chrome 63, which indicate Google is putting the finishing touches on Chrome Home. One new flag, ‘Chrome Home Promo’ (#enable-chrome-home-promo), adds an item to the overflow menu titled ‘You’re using the new Chrome.’ Tapping on it opens a popup explaining the new interface, with a switch to disable it entirely.

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

Another flag called ‘Chrome Opt-out Snackbar’ (#enable-chrome-home-opt-out-snackbar) is exactly what it sounds like. If someone chooses to disable the Chrome Home UI with the above-mentioned switch, this flag will ask users to take a survey. I’m sure most of the responses will be, “why is everything white now?” and “why did my address bar move?”

Presumably, both of these flags will be enabled whenever Google decides to start rolling out Chrome Home to everyone. There’s still no telling when Google will pull the switch, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s soon.

New flags page

Chrome’s flags page, located at chrome://flags, contains toggles for hundreds of features and experiments (including the above-mentioned Chrome Home UI). But the page itself has hardly changed since the browser was introduced, and it’s especially tedious to navigate on mobile. Thankfully, there’s a new design in Chrome 63.

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

We first covered the new layout when it reached Chrome Canary two months ago, and now it has arrived in the stable version. Everything is more spaced out, the tiny links are now large buttons, and there is finally a search bar.

‘Minimal UI’ for web apps

When you add a site or web app to your home screen, Chrome checks the site’s manifest file to see how the web app wants to be shown. Until now, there have only been three options. The default option (also called ‘browser’) opens the web app in a new browser tab, ‘standalone’ opens the application with the status bar visible but no browser UI, and ‘fullscreen’ makes the web app full screen.

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

From left to right: Default UI, Standalone UI, Minimal UI

With Chrome 63, there is a new option that developers can use – ‘Minimal UI.’ On Chrome, this makes the web app look like a Chrome Custom Tab, and the web app can define the UI color. This is ideal for web apps that still want users to easily access the current URL, like blogs or news sites.

You can try a demo of the Minimal UI here. Just add that web app to your home screen to see it in action.

Other features

Like always, Chrome 63 includes changes for both users and developers. Here are some smaller features that ship with this update.

  • Auto-completion in the address bar has been improved.
  • Dynamic module imports and asynchronous generator functions in JavaScript is now supported.
  • The new Device Memory API allows sites to determine how much RAM your device has.
  • Chrome for Android now shows permission prompts as pop-ups, instead of banners at the bottom of the screen.
  • Sites can use the new ‘overscroll-behavior’ CSS property to change what happens when the page is scrolled all the way to the end.
  • NTLMv2 authentication is now supported.
  • The /deep/ and CSS selectors have been removed from Chrome.
  • Web page buttons on Chrome for macOS should now look more native.
  • The popup for download
  • On the desktop, it is now easier to view SSL certificates for websites.
  • Smart Text Selection should now work on Android 8.1.

APK Download

The APK is signed by Google and upgrades your existing app. The cryptographic signature guarantees that the file is safe to install and was not tampered with in any way. Rather than wait for Google to push this download to your devices, which can take days, download and install it just like any other APK.

Version:63.0.3239.83

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

It’s that time of the month again – Google has released a brand new version of Chrome for Android. We’re now up to version 63, which brings a few useful improvements and further changes to the in-development ‘Chrome Home’ interface.

Chrome Home

Google has been working on a major interface revamp for Chrome since October of last year, called ‘Chrome Home.’ It started to take shape in March, and then it was revamped again in August. Google started rolling it out with Chrome 62, but the vast majority of users are still on the old design by default.

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

Modern UI in Chrome 62

There are a few new flags in Chrome 63, which indicate Google is putting the finishing touches on Chrome Home. One new flag, ‘Chrome Home Promo’ (#enable-chrome-home-promo), adds an item to the overflow menu titled ‘You’re using the new Chrome.’ Tapping on it opens a popup explaining the new interface, with a switch to disable it entirely.

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

Another flag called ‘Chrome Opt-out Snackbar’ (#enable-chrome-home-opt-out-snackbar) is exactly what it sounds like. If someone chooses to disable the Chrome Home UI with the above-mentioned switch, this flag will ask users to take a survey. I’m sure most of the responses will be, “why is everything white now?” and “why did my address bar move?”

Presumably, both of these flags will be enabled whenever Google decides to start rolling out Chrome Home to everyone. There’s still no telling when Google will pull the switch, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s soon.

New flags page

Chrome’s flags page, located at chrome://flags, contains toggles for hundreds of features and experiments (including the above-mentioned Chrome Home UI). But the page itself has hardly changed since the browser was introduced, and it’s especially tedious to navigate on mobile. Thankfully, there’s a new design in Chrome 63.

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

We first covered the new layout when it reached Chrome Canary two months ago, and now it has arrived in the stable version. Everything is more spaced out, the tiny links are now large buttons, and there is finally a search bar.

‘Minimal UI’ for web apps

When you add a site or web app to your home screen, Chrome checks the site’s manifest file to see how the web app wants to be shown. Until now, there have only been three options. The default option (also called ‘browser’) opens the web app in a new browser tab, ‘standalone’ opens the application with the status bar visible but no browser UI, and ‘fullscreen’ makes the web app full screen.

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

From left to right: Default UI, Standalone UI, Minimal UI

With Chrome 63, there is a new option that developers can use – ‘Minimal UI.’ On Chrome, this makes the web app look like a Chrome Custom Tab, and the web app can define the UI color. This is ideal for web apps that still want users to easily access the current URL, like blogs or news sites.

You can try a demo of the Minimal UI here. Just add that web app to your home screen to see it in action.

Other features

Like always, Chrome 63 includes changes for both users and developers. Here are some smaller features that ship with this update.

  • Auto-completion in the address bar has been improved.
  • Dynamic module imports and asynchronous generator functions in JavaScript is now supported.
  • The new Device Memory API allows sites to determine how much RAM your device has.
  • Chrome for Android now shows permission prompts as pop-ups, instead of banners at the bottom of the screen.
  • Sites can use the new ‘overscroll-behavior’ CSS property to change what happens when the page is scrolled all the way to the end.
  • NTLMv2 authentication is now supported.
  • The /deep/ and CSS selectors have been removed from Chrome.
  • Web page buttons on Chrome for macOS should now look more native.
  • The popup for download
  • On the desktop, it is now easier to view SSL certificates for websites.
  • Smart Text Selection should now work on Android 8.1.

APK Download

The APK is signed by Google and upgrades your existing app. The cryptographic signature guarantees that the file is safe to install and was not tampered with in any way. Rather than wait for Google to push this download to your devices, which can take days, download and install it just like any other APK.

Version:63.0.3239.83

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

It’s that time of the month again – Google has released a brand new version of Chrome for Android. We’re now up to version 63, which brings a few useful improvements and further changes to the in-development ‘Chrome Home’ interface.

Chrome Home

Google has been working on a major interface revamp for Chrome since October of last year, called ‘Chrome Home.’ It started to take shape in March, and then it was revamped again in August. Google started rolling it out with Chrome 62, but the vast majority of users are still on the old design by default.

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

Modern UI in Chrome 62

There are a few new flags in Chrome 63, which indicate Google is putting the finishing touches on Chrome Home. One new flag, ‘Chrome Home Promo’ (#enable-chrome-home-promo), adds an item to the overflow menu titled ‘You’re using the new Chrome.’ Tapping on it opens a popup explaining the new interface, with a switch to disable it entirely.

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

Another flag called ‘Chrome Opt-out Snackbar’ (#enable-chrome-home-opt-out-snackbar) is exactly what it sounds like. If someone chooses to disable the Chrome Home UI with the above-mentioned switch, this flag will ask users to take a survey. I’m sure most of the responses will be, “why is everything white now?” and “why did my address bar move?”

Presumably, both of these flags will be enabled whenever Google decides to start rolling out Chrome Home to everyone. There’s still no telling when Google will pull the switch, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s soon.

New flags page

Chrome’s flags page, located at chrome://flags, contains toggles for hundreds of features and experiments (including the above-mentioned Chrome Home UI). But the page itself has hardly changed since the browser was introduced, and it’s especially tedious to navigate on mobile. Thankfully, there’s a new design in Chrome 63.

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

We first covered the new layout when it reached Chrome Canary two months ago, and now it has arrived in the stable version. Everything is more spaced out, the tiny links are now large buttons, and there is finally a search bar.

‘Minimal UI’ for web apps

When you add a site or web app to your home screen, Chrome checks the site’s manifest file to see how the web app wants to be shown. Until now, there have only been three options. The default option (also called ‘browser’) opens the web app in a new browser tab, ‘standalone’ opens the application with the status bar visible but no browser UI, and ‘fullscreen’ makes the web app full screen.

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download] 76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

From left to right: Default UI, Standalone UI, Minimal UI

With Chrome 63, there is a new option that developers can use – ‘Minimal UI.’ On Chrome, this makes the web app look like a Chrome Custom Tab, and the web app can define the UI color. This is ideal for web apps that still want users to easily access the current URL, like blogs or news sites.

You can try a demo of the Minimal UI here. Just add that web app to your home screen to see it in action.

Other features

Like always, Chrome 63 includes changes for both users and developers. Here are some smaller features that ship with this update.

  • Auto-completion in the address bar has been improved.
  • Dynamic module imports and asynchronous generator functions in JavaScript is now supported.
  • The new Device Memory API allows sites to determine how much RAM your device has.
  • Chrome for Android now shows permission prompts as pop-ups, instead of banners at the bottom of the screen.
  • Sites can use the new ‘overscroll-behavior’ CSS property to change what happens when the page is scrolled all the way to the end.
  • NTLMv2 authentication is now supported.
  • The /deep/ and CSS selectors have been removed from Chrome.
  • Web page buttons on Chrome for macOS should now look more native.
  • The popup for download
  • On the desktop, it is now easier to view SSL certificates for websites.
  • Smart Text Selection should now work on Android 8.1.

APK Download

The APK is signed by Google and upgrades your existing app. The cryptographic signature guarantees that the file is safe to install and was not tampered with in any way. Rather than wait for Google to push this download to your devices, which can take days, download and install it just like any other APK.

Version:63.0.3239.83

76f26_nexus2cee_Screenshot_20170914-165917-217x386 Chrome 63 adds new flags page, prepares Chrome Home UI for wide rollout, and more [APK Download]

Chrome 63 rolling out to Mac, Windows, and Linux w/ Flags redesign, Site Certificate shortcut

Chrome 63 is rolling out to Mac, Windows, and Linux today with an assortment of developer-focused features and security fixes. The biggest additions in this desktop release are a redesigned chrome://flags page and a tweaked permissions dropdown.


2adaa_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 rolling out to Mac, Windows, and Linux w/ Flags redesign, Site Certificate shortcut

Nintendo Switch

The chrome://flags page lets users enable and disable in-development Chrome experiments. This page has received a Material Design facelift that adds tabs to separate Available and Unavailable experiments, as well as new buttons and dropdowns.

However, the best change is how experiment descriptions no longer span the width of the page. Meanwhile, there is a new app bar up top that houses a search feature and large “Reset all to defaults” button.

Meanwhile, the dropdown accessible by clicking on the lock or info icon to the left of the address bar has been slightly revamped. It now only shows a handful of permissions, with a “Site settings” button below to see all of them for a page in Settings. There is also now a shortcut to quickly see a Site Certificate.

2adaa_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 rolling out to Mac, Windows, and Linux w/ Flags redesign, Site Certificate shortcut 2adaa_CI_NSwitch_Console_02 Chrome 63 rolling out to Mac, Windows, and Linux w/ Flags redesign, Site Certificate shortcut

 

There is a new Device Memory JavaScript API that helps developers determine the total RAM on a user’s device. As such, sites could instead serve a lite version to improve the user experience.

The bulk of changes in this version are for Android with a new, more explicit Permissions pop-up. This modal dialog replaces the simple bottom banner that was easily ignored by users and thus abused by developers. Other changes include a new prompt for the upcoming Chrome Home bottom bar redesign and support for Oreo’s Smart Text Selection feature.

Chrome 63 for desktop and Android is now available, with Chrome OS following shortly.


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