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Here’s the Surprising Reason Lindsey Vonn Spreads Cheese on Her Injuries

There is something special about Lindsey Vonn. No matter how many times she gets knocked done, she gets right back up, including after her latest fall at Lake Louise in Canada during the Audi FIS Ski World Cup. “I’ve definitely had my fair share of setbacks; that’s just a part of ski racing,” says Vonn. “We push ourselves to the limit, and we are going 90 miles an hour down an icy mountain, and sometimes things go wrong…and so I just figure out a way to pick myself back up.”

One secret behind the 33-year-old’s ability to bounce back: cheese. Yes, you read that correctly, cheese. In fact, the gold-medal Olympic skier recently posted a series of Stories on Instagram about the dairy product. In one, the creamy stuff is being smeared all over her right knee. Vonn’s caption: “Some cheese therapy. My favorite.”

0a00c_lvonncheese Here's the Surprising Reason Lindsey Vonn Spreads Cheese on Her Injuries

RELATED: Everything You Need to Know About Runner’s Knee–Even If You’re Not a Runner

But does it really work? “There is no validated scientific evidence for applying cheese, per se, to bruises and injuries,” says Michele Olson, PhD, a professor of exercise physiology at Auburn University in Alabama. “There may be some anti-inflammatory benefits for eating or ingesting cheese, but nothing magical about applying it superficially.”

Vonn, who recently launched her signature skiwear collection with Under Armour, would disagree. The skier has been using this recovery practice with cheese called Topfen for years. “It is an Austrian cured cheese with anti-inflammatory properties,” she says.

“I believe what they are trying to do is to create a poultice which has been practiced in traditional medicine,” explains John Lucey, PhD, director of the Center for Dairy Research and professor of food science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “The materials used for poultices are often moist, warm, semi-solid type materials and have been used to help drain abscesses, reduce swelling, etc. The poultice is packed around the infected areas and then wrapped in bandages.”

Which is exactly what Vonn seems to have done in the second post to her Stories, which shows her cheese-laden knee wrapped in Hyperice Knee—a portable cryothetapy device designed to treat and prevent pain and inflammation. Vonn wrote: “Cheese on the bottom, @hyperice on the top. Getting better.” 

 

0a00c_lvonncheese Here's the Surprising Reason Lindsey Vonn Spreads Cheese on Her Injuries

RELATED: The Best Workout to Do When You’re Really Sore

“There are a few components in cheese that could have some potential anti-inflammatory type of effect,” Lucey adds. “These include specific types of bacteria like some probiotics, if present. And there are some types of bioactive peptides with this possible benefit.” Though he notes, however, that most of these perks, if not all, are thought to come from eating cheese.

So what does that mean if you find yourself banged up and bruised? Well, experts such as Charla Fischer, MD, an orthopedic surgeon at NYU Langone Orthopedic Hospital who specializes in spine surgery and back and neck problems, wouldn’t point you toward the dairy aisle at your local grocery store.

“I know that athletes are really in tune with all the anti-inflammatory foods,” says Dr. Fischer, “but as far as placing things externally to help affect inflammation around the soft tissue … I haven’t heard of cheese or any sort of dairy product [that does that].” 

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Dr. Fischer’s recommendation for speeding up recovery? The good old RICE method— rest, ice, compression, and elevation. “If you notice that something is swollen after an activity, doing those things are always going to be helpful,” she explains.  “If you have a knee with a little bit of swelling, just resting it, getting your knee above heart level, maybe an ACE wrap for a little compression—not anything too tight because you don’t want to cut off circulation—and ice always helps with swelling.” She recommends icing for 20 minutes three times a day.

Dr. Fischer also advises that you be cognizant of your pain levels post injury: If it is less than a 4 on a scale of 1 to 10 after three to five days, then you are on the right track, she notes. But if it is above a 4, you might want to consider calling your primary care doctor.

As for Vonn, the cheese remedy doesn’t seem to have held her back in any way. She’s racked up an impressive two Olympic gold medals and 77 World Cup victories after all! If she finds it works for her, we guess that’s all that really matters.

New Research Says Cheese Is A Health Food (Really!)

The saturated fat debate has long been raging in the health food world. Earlier this year, coconut oil made headlines as the American Heart Association declared it unilaterally unhealthy (mbg doctors largely disagree, with a few caveats). Now, a new saturated fat has fallen under the scrutiny of researchers: cheese.

Dairy has always been a dicey subject in the health food world. Many diets (paleo, vegan) tend to shun it, and some doctors point to it as the root of issues like inflammation, gut problems, and acne. The two primary exceptions are ayurveda, which embraces the milk by-product, and the of-the-moment keto diet, which relies on such a high-fat intake that cheese becomes practically a necessity.

In a new meta-analysis, researchers from China and the Netherlands analyzed 15 studies encompassing more than 200,000 people about the health effects of cheese. Thirteen of the studies analyzed went on for over 10 years. The findings?

Overall, people who consumed high levels of cheese were 10 percent less likely to have a stroke and 14 percent less likely to develop coronary heart disease than participants who consumed no cheese. More isn’t necessarily better, though. In the study, too much cheese was found to be as negative as too little, with the sweet spot hitting around 40 grams a day (about the size of a matchbook). Researchers didn’t specify whether one type of cheese was better than the rest.

Before you go out and gobble down a slice of pizza, keep in mind that there may be more to the story. According to functional medicine practitioner Will Cole, D.C., there are many factors, such as the rest of a person’s diet, that need to really be taken into consideration before making the claim that eating cheese every day is the key to minimizing heart disease. “Cheese is a high-fat food that can be very popular in ketogenic diets, and these diets have been shown to actually decrease bad oxidated cholesterol and increase good HDL cholesterol and lower inflammation levels, all markers of higher heart disease risk,” he says. “The key is to really examine the context of the diet outside of cheese intake since eating extremely high levels of cheese was also correlated with increased heart disease risk. People may be eating more processed foods in addition to cheese, which can negate the benefits of these healthy fats.” The take-away? Cheese is only one part of a diet, and while it may not be as harmful as previously thought, it’s also not a panacea—at least on its own.

Dr. Cole also notes the importance of the quality of said cheese. “Focus on grass-fed, organic dairy,” he says. “It’s also important to mention that not everyone tolerates dairy, even the grass-fed organic kind. We are all truly different, so listen to your own body.”

OK, so cheese might not be so bad, but what about butter? A functional medicine doc dives into the science.

Eating cheese every day might actually be healthy

A nib of cheese a day keeps the heart disease away.

A recent analysis of more than 200,000 people showed that those who ate a little bit of cheese every day were less likely to develop heart disease compared to those who rarely or never ate it at all. The researchers from China and the Netherlands examined data compiled from 15 previous studies where most of the participants were tracked for at least 10 years.

Overall, those who ate more cheese had a 14% lower risk of developing heart disease and were 10% less likely to have a stroke than their cheese-averse peers. But experts warn that the findings were not linear — meaning the study does not advocate eating enormous quantities of cheese. People who seemed to have health benefits from cheese ate about 40 grams a day or, a square the size of a matchbook.

“This is not the same as eating a big slice of cheesy pizza every day,” director of aortic surgery at Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center, Dr. Allan Stewart, who was not involved in the study, told Time. “(But the findings were) certainly different from what people might expect.”

People are living longer but less-healthy lives

The dairy product contains healthful ingredients like calcium, protein and probiotics, said the authors of a new study, published in the European Journal of Nutrition.

(Magone/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

The dairy product contains healthful ingredients like calcium, protein and probiotics, said the authors of a new study, published in the European Journal of Nutrition. But cheese, like other milk-based products, contains high levels of saturated fat — which can cause high cholesterol and an increased risk of heart disease.

In the study, cheese was only found to have an association with lowered health risks, not a direct cause and effect. The link might be because people who eat cheese daily are already healthier or because they have disposable income, the researchers said. But the good might outweigh the bad with cheese.

“Cheese can be high in probiotics, which tend to put you in less of an inflammatory state,” Stewart said. “There is some evidence that cheese — as a substitute for milk, for example — may actually have a protective effect on the heart. No one’s saying you should definitely go out and eat 40 grams of cheese a day. But on the upside, a bit of cheese on a cracker doesn’t sound unreasonable.”

Tags: health studies healthy eating Send a Letter to the Editor Join the Conversation: facebook Tweet

Eating cheese every day might actually be healthy

A nib of cheese a day keeps the heart disease away.

A recent analysis of more than 200,000 people showed that those who ate a little bit of cheese every day were less likely to develop heart disease compared to those who rarely or never ate it at all. The researchers from China and the Netherlands examined data compiled from 15 previous studies where most of the participants were tracked for at least 10 years.

Overall, those who ate more cheese had a 14% lower risk of developing heart disease and were 10% less likely to have a stroke than their cheese-averse peers. But experts warn that the findings were not linear — meaning the study does not advocate eating enormous quantities of cheese. People who seemed to have health benefits from cheese ate about 40 grams a day or, a square the size of a matchbook.

“This is not the same as eating a big slice of cheesy pizza every day,” director of aortic surgery at Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center, Dr. Allan Stewart, who was not involved in the study, told Time. “(But the findings were) certainly different from what people might expect.”

People are living longer but less-healthy lives

The dairy product contains healthful ingredients like calcium, protein and probiotics, said the authors of a new study, published in the European Journal of Nutrition.

(Magone/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

The dairy product contains healthful ingredients like calcium, protein and probiotics, said the authors of a new study, published in the European Journal of Nutrition. But cheese, like other milk-based products, contains high levels of saturated fat — which can cause high cholesterol and an increased risk of heart disease.

In the study, cheese was only found to have an association with lowered health risks, not a direct cause and effect. The link might be because people who eat cheese daily are already healthier or because they have disposable income, the researchers said. But the good might outweigh the bad with cheese.

“Cheese can be high in probiotics, which tend to put you in less of an inflammatory state,” Stewart said. “There is some evidence that cheese — as a substitute for milk, for example — may actually have a protective effect on the heart. No one’s saying you should definitely go out and eat 40 grams of cheese a day. But on the upside, a bit of cheese on a cracker doesn’t sound unreasonable.”

Tags: health studies healthy eating Send a Letter to the Editor Join the Conversation: facebook Tweet

Eating cheese every day may help to protect heart health

If you’re a cheese lover, you will welcome the results of this new study with open arms. Researchers suggest that eating around 40 grams (or 1.41 ounces) of cheese every day could help to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke.

Researchers suggest that eating a small amount of cheese every day may benefit heart health.

These new findings come from an analysis of 15 observational studies that looked at the effects of cheese intake on the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Study co-author Li-Qiang Qin — who works in the Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene at Soochow University’s School of Public Health in China — and colleagues report their results in the European Journal of Nutrition.

Cheese is undoubtedly one of our favorite foods. In 2015, the population of the United States consumed the equivalent of 37.1 pounds of cheese per person, with Cheddar and mozzarella being the most popular choices.

While cheese contains some nutrients that are beneficial to health — such as calcium, zinc, and vitamins A and B-12 — it is also high in saturated fats, which can increase cholesterol levels and raise the risk of heart disease and stroke.

The new study, however, suggests that this popular dairy product could have the opposite effect on cardiovascular health.

2a1ad_mnt_history_leaderboard Eating cheese every day may help to protect heart health

CVD risk reduced by up to 18 percent

For their study, Qin and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of 15 observational studies that investigated how cheese consumption influenced the total risk of CVD, as well as the risks of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke.

In total, the studies included more than 200,000 participants, and the effects of cheese intake were monitored for more than 10 years. The majority of studies included subjects who were free of CVD at study baseline.

The analysis revealed that people who regularly consumed cheese were up to 18 percent less likely to develop CVD, up to 14 percent less likely to develop CHD, and up to 10 percent less likely to have a stroke, compared with those who had a low cheese intake.

The scientists report that these effects were strongest among participants who consumed around 40 grams, or 1.41 ounces, of cheese every day. In conclusion, they write:

This meta-analysis of prospective studies suggests a nonlinear inverse association between cheese consumption and risk of CVD.”

2a1ad_mnt_history_leaderboard Eating cheese every day may help to protect heart health

Be cautious

The team’s findings build on those of a widely publicized observational analysis that was published earlier this year, which linked cheese and other dairy products to a reduced risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.

But don’t stock up on the Cheddar just yet; both studies have their own limitations. Importantly, they are observational, so they do not prove a causal association between cheese intake and better cardiovascular health.

What is more, both studies have links to the dairy industry; the earlier study received funding from the Global Dairy Platform, Dairy Research Institute, and Dairy Australia, while the latest study was conducted with the help researchers from the Yili Group, a dairy company based in China.

However, it is hard to conclude whether these associations had any influence on the study results.

Until additional studies confirm such findings, it is important to remember that cheese is high in saturated fats, which can be harmful to heart health in high amounts.

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommend that around 5–6 percent of our daily calories should come from saturated fats, and to switch to low-fat dairy products to help stay within this limit.

Google Fixes ‘Android Burger’ Emoji, Places Cheese Atop Patty in Android 8.1 Oreo Developer Preview

Google has finally ‘corrected’ the placement of the cheese slice in the burger emoji on Android, after facing some ridicule on Twitter earlier this month. Google CEO Sundar Pichai had responded to the Twitter trend, saying he would ‘drop everything’ to fix it. It appears he has. The latest Android 8.1 Oreo Developer Preview 2 comes with a handful of tweaked emojis, including the burger emoji, which now has the cheese slice on top of the patty instead of below.

The corrected versions of emojis were first spotted by Emojipedia, which is now available under the Android 8.1 Developer Preview 2. As per the report, a new and improved cheeseburger emoji will have the cheese placed atop the patty, as opposed to underneath it.

The intense debate on Twitter over the cheese placement in a burger was also joined by Google CEO Sundar Pichai, who promised to ‘drop everything’ to address this irregularity with a burger. Later, Google also served ‘Android burgers’ to its employees at its Seattle office.

The debate started when Thomas Baekdal, Founder of Baekdal Media, tweeted on the difference in the placement of the cheese slices in the Android and Apple burger emojis. His tweet got multiple interactions, which ultimately became a social media trend. The key difference between ‘Android burger’ emoji and any other is that the slice of cheese is placed beneath the patty and atop the lower bun. Apart from Pichai’s humorous response, Google’s Seattle office had also chimed in on the controversy, and served Googlers the ‘Android burger’, with cheese below the patty.

Besides, Google has also refreshed a few more emojis. The ‘beer’ emoji now has two full mugs of beer with froth on top, unlike its previous version with half-filled mugs with the froth on top. Another emoji that has been fixed is of the cheese, which now has refined edges on the holes and readjusted colour tone.

Written with inputs from IANS

The internet is nauseated over this Iowan’s Pop-Tart and cheese sandwich

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You may find yourself sipping some surprising beverages in 2018, if Whole Foods’ predictions for the hottest food trends next year come true
Time

Iowans tend to get creative with their meals. One stroll around the food stands at the Iowa State Fair will prove as such.

But a Pop-Tart and cheese sandwich? That might be pushing the envelope a bit too much, social media suggests.

Chris Jorgensen, a sophomore at Iowa State University, tweeted a pair of photos Nov. 9 of the breakfast-and-dairy product combination. The caption read: “You ain’t from Iowa if you never had one of these.” 

The tweet drew hundreds of retweets, quote tweets and comments.

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Jorgensen told the Des Moines Register on Monday he’s come across similar “gross foods” posts in the past on his own social media timelines. So on a night when he opened his cupboards and realized he didn’t have much to eat, Jorgensen wanted to experiment.

“I thought: ‘What could be the grossest thing I could put between two Pop-Tarts?’ ” Jorgensen said. “So I went to the fridge and got a cheese slice.”

But the internet had a terrible taste in its mouth and couldn’t have disagreed any further than it did. These are some of the best reactions:

On the contrary to the majority’s opinion, Hy-Vee didn’t seem to bat a lash at the unusual concoction:

Jorgensen wasn’t originally planning to take a bite, but he said his roommates told him he needed to if he was going to tweet about it.

“There wasn’t much cheese in the bite that I got,” he said, adding that the Strawberry-flavored Pop-Tart isn’t his favorite.

RELATED: This writer said Iowa’s loose-meat sandwich is the grossest food in the state

Other than the common “disgusting” comments, he said people have complimented the quality of the photos as well as the plate the Pop-Tart sandwich is on.

“Apparently everyone’s grandma has those plates,” Jorgensen said.

But Jorgensen never thought the tweet would get as much attention as it has.

“I think I’ve done some damage to the state of Iowa,” he said, laughing.

Interested in trending Iowa news? Follow @AaYoung15 on Twitter.

Google Cafeteria Serves Employees A Real Android Burger With Same Cheese Faux Pas

With all of the stresses from life reported in the daily news, it’s refreshing sometimes to hear something light-hearted that isn’t serious or impactful in any way, but instead is just entertaining or playful. Case in point: the absurd hamburger emoji that’s plagued Android for some time. If there’s one thing people don’t like other people messing with, it’s their hamburgers. Shame on you, Google.

As a bit of a refresher, media analyst and Twitter user Tomas Baekdal posted to the social media service at the end of October, drawing comparisons between the hamburger emoji used in iOS, versus the one in Android. If the problem somehow isn’t obvious, you may just be one of those people who puts the toilet paper roll on the wrong way as well…

Google head Sundar Pichai ultimately chimed in with a hilarious tweet, saying that the company will stop what it’s doing immediately and correct the problem the forthcoming work week. Little did we realize, that was not the end of this bit of back and forth. Another Twitter user this weekend just posted a picture from a cafeteria at Google, where an “Android Burger” was being served. Yup, you know what’s coming…

We’re going to have to go out on a limb and say that despite the monumental deliberate culinary faux pas, these burgers still look downright appetizing. Although, as one Twitter user commented, the lack of sesame seeds could be considered also be considered complete sacrilege. 

It’s really interesting just how much the simple emoji has become a part of our lives. The next thing you know, they’ll make a movie about them. Oh wait…

Google serves employees ‘Android burgers’ with cheese below the patty

After an intense debate on the placement of cheese in Android’s and Apple’s burger emojis, Google served real version of ‘Android burger’ emojis to its employees during Friday’s lunch.

At its Seattle office, the workers were served “Android burgers”, ending the debate that Android burger emoji is the winner when it comes to placing the cheese.

“The key difference between this burger and any other is that the slice of cheese is placed beneath the patty and atop the lower bun. It looks exactly like Android’s burger emoji, which sparked heated controversy earlier this week over the correct ingredient order of America’s beloved staple,” The Verge reported on Saturday.

The whole thing started when Thomas Baekdal, a writer and media analyst, tweeted early this week on the placement of cheese in Android and Apple burger emojis.

“I think we need to have a discussion about how Google’s burger emoji is placing the cheese underneath the burger, while Apple puts it on top,” Baekdal tweeted.

Reacting to this, Pichai tweeted, promising to “drop everything” and address the issue if people on the platform agree on what the correct placement of ingredient should be.

With serving “Android burgers,” it appears the kitchen department at Google has heard Pichai loud and clear.

The hamburger emoji, also known as the cheeseburger, was approved as part of Unicode 6.0 in 2010 and added to Emoji 1.0 in 2015, according to Emojipedia — an emoji reference website.

People are furiously debating the correct placement of cheese in the burger emoji

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Is cheese healthy? – CNN – CNN.com

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