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iPhone takes top rank as Flickr’s most used camera

49e62_flickr-most-popular-brands-2017 iPhone takes top rank as Flickr's most used cameraEnlarge Image

Apple is more popular than Canon and Nikon combined.


Flickr

Flickr, the popular image hosting site, just shared some interesting info on the top cameras of 2017. According to its data, the iPhone ranks as the most popular camera with 54 percent of photographers using devices from Apple — more than all the other traditional camera companies combined.

In general, phones captured 50 percent of the photos uploaded to Flickr. Other camera types like DSLR, point-and-shoot and mirrorless came in at 33 percent, 12 percent and 4 percent respectively.

It shouldn’t be too surprising that phones account for such a large portion of modern photography. The cameras in phones keep getting more and more advanced with dual-lenses, more megapixels and AI integrated camera software. Phonemakers know this and use photography as a major selling point for new phones — Huawei collaborates with Leica, Google brags about the highly rated camera on its Pixel 2 and Apple even has an Instagram for its “Shot on iPhone” campaign.

49e62_flickr-most-popular-brands-2017 iPhone takes top rank as Flickr's most used camera

Flickr says that nine out of ten of its most popular devices are taken up by different iPhones. The top three spots were occupied by the iPhone 6iPhone 6S and iPhone 5S in that order. The only non-iPhone to place in the top ten was the Canon 5D Mark III, which came in 9th place. While Canon came in second place for most popular brand, it only accounted for 23 percent of the top 100 devices. Nikon came in third with 18 percent.

Apple’s photography presence has been growing steadily for the past few years. In 2016 Flickr ranked Apple as its most popular brand with 47 percent using Apple devices. In 2015 Apple took the top rank at about 30 percent. But 2017 marked the first year that the majority of Flickr users were using iPhones and phones in general accounted for half of all photos uploaded.

Canon or Nikon may come to mind when told to think of a popular camera brand, but that title may belong to Apple.

Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment on this story.

49e62_flickr-most-popular-brands-2017 iPhone takes top rank as Flickr's most used camera

iPhone takes top rank as Flickr’s most used camera

49e62_flickr-most-popular-brands-2017 iPhone takes top rank as Flickr's most used cameraEnlarge Image

Apple is more popular than Canon and Nikon combined.


Flickr

Flickr, the popular image hosting site, just shared some interesting info on the top cameras of 2017. According to its data, the iPhone ranks as the most popular camera with 54 percent of photographers using devices from Apple — more than all the other traditional camera companies combined.

In general, phones captured 50 percent of the photos uploaded to Flickr. Other camera types like DSLR, point-and-shoot and mirrorless came in at 33 percent, 12 percent and 4 percent respectively.

It shouldn’t be too surprising that phones account for such a large portion of modern photography. The cameras in phones keep getting more and more advanced with dual-lenses, more megapixels and AI integrated camera software. Phonemakers know this and use photography as a major selling point for new phones — Huawei collaborates with Leica, Google brags about the highly rated camera on its Pixel 2 and Apple even has an Instagram for its “Shot on iPhone” campaign.

49e62_flickr-most-popular-brands-2017 iPhone takes top rank as Flickr's most used camera

Flickr says that nine out of ten of its most popular devices are taken up by different iPhones. The top three spots were occupied by the iPhone 6iPhone 6S and iPhone 5S in that order. The only non-iPhone to place in the top ten was the Canon 5D Mark III, which came in 9th place. While Canon came in second place for most popular brand, it only accounted for 23 percent of the top 100 devices. Nikon came in third with 18 percent.

Apple’s photography presence has been growing steadily for the past few years. In 2016 Flickr ranked Apple as its most popular brand with 47 percent using Apple devices. In 2015 Apple took the top rank at about 30 percent. But 2017 marked the first year that the majority of Flickr users were using iPhones and phones in general accounted for half of all photos uploaded.

Canon or Nikon may come to mind when told to think of a popular camera brand, but that title may belong to Apple.

Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment on this story.

49e62_flickr-most-popular-brands-2017 iPhone takes top rank as Flickr's most used camera

Flickr Says the iPhone Was the Most Used Camera on Its Platform in 2017

iPhone has once again been named the most used camera on popular image-sharing platform Flickr – the smartphone series has been thus named for two years. The iPhone had an almost clean sweep, accounting for 9 out of the top 10 devices of 2017 on Flickr. Only the Canon 5D Mark III ranked ninth on this list dominated by the iPhone.

Smartphones accounted for 50 percent of the photos uploaded to Flickr, up from 48 percent in 2016. DSLRs accounted for 33 percent, up from 25 percent in 2016, and point and shoot cameras accounted for 12 percent, down from 21 percent in 2016. Mirrorless cameras remained at 4 percent of total uploads for the third year in a row, according to the blog post by Flickr. Apple iPhones accounted for 54 percent of the top 100 devices on the list.

Among the iPhone models, the iPhone 6 was the most popular among the lot, followed by iPhone 6s and iPhone 5s. Also, Canon came second on this list of top 100 devices, with 23 percent share, followed by Nikon with 18 percent. Rest of the brands took up a meagre 5 percent in the list. This study is based on results from Flickr’s 75-million user base.

Another interesting development this year is that usage of DSLRs went up to 33 percent from last year’s 25 percent, prompting a decline in usage of point-and-shoot cameras. What next year holds is not known but looking at the popularity of Apple’s latest iPhone X, it won’t be a surprise that Apple triumphs the 2018 list with even better numbers.

New Triple-lens Camera Leak Details Huawei’s Threat To Galaxy Note 8 And iPhone X

Dual camera setups are redefining our expectations of what’s possible from smartphone photography, but Chinese manufacturer, Huawei, looks set to go one better by introducing a triple rear camera.

According to prolific, and famously accurate, leaker, Evan Blass, Huawei seems to have been considering a 40MP three-lensed camera for a forthcoming smartphone, probably the P11.

Taking to Twitter, Blass writes:

Is the next Huawei P-series going to be an imaging powerhouse? A digital artist at one of the company’s creative agencies added these “PCE Series” ads to their portfolio — claiming 40MP, 3 lens rear (5x hybrid zoom) + 24MP selfie, all Leica-co-developed.”

The “PCE Series” information shown in the leak, which has since been removed from the artist’s portfolio, includes details of a 40MP camera using three lenses to deliver up to 5x zoom, taking its capabilities far beyond currently available smartphone cameras.

Huawei pins a great deal of importance on its smartphone cameras, not only in forming a working relationship with premium camera manufacturer, Leica, but also in terms of the cost of the camera hardware itself.

This latest development, should it turn out to be true, would be a perfect for a company so clearly aiming to make waves in smartphone photography.

Why include three cameras?

The obvious question is whether or not three cameras could actually deliver any tangible benefits to the user over a dual-camera setup. After all, Google’s Pixel 2 currently delivers first glass performance with just a single lens.

In my opinion, there most certainly are advantages to be gained from a third camera and here’s why:

While the benefits of dual cameras can include increased light-gathering capability, optical zoom effects, reduced image noise and some level of 3D depth-perception, the actual benefits received depend on the particular configuration of lenses used.

Simplistically put, you could use a pair of dissimilar lenses as in the iPhone 8 Plus, iPhone X and Samsung Galaxy Note 8, to enable telephoto or wide angle shots or, as Huawei has chosen to do with the current Mate 10 flagship, you could use a pair cameras with identical lenses and combine their output for higher image quality.

However, adding a third camera would, therefore, allow the use of both of these approaches at the same time. For example, by combining a pair of similar lenses for great quality with a third telephoto lens to add extra zoom capabilities.

Huawei’s current implementation does offer a 2x ‘lossless zoom’ mode which relies on the higher 20MP pixel resolution of a dedicated monochrome camera to boost the details captured by the 12MP main colour sensor.

However, adding a third zoom lens would allow for the extended 5x zoom range mentioned in the leak. Fitting a 40MP sensor in a smartphone would usually be problematic due to the additional image noise which would likely occur. However, combining the output of three separate sensors could go a long way to mitigating against this.

Also mentioned in the leaked advertisements are a 24MP selfie camera, a ‘Pro Night Mode’ and ‘Pro AI camera assist’. If done well, a three-camera system from Huawei will definitely be one to watch.

___

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The iPhone remains the most popular camera on Flickr, and it’s not even close

The original iPhone helped kickstart the modern-day smartphone revolution, and among other things, ultimately gave individuals the ability to take jaw-dropping photographs without having to carry around a dedicated point-and-shoot. Though original iPhone left much to be desired camera-wise, it didn’t take long for Apple to start throwing more and more engineering resources towards improving photo quality on the iPhone.

With each passing year, it seems as if every new iPhone release sets a new bar of excellence for mobile photography. And in a statistic that may not come as much of a surprise, the iPhone today remains the most popular camera within the Flickr community. For the year gone by, Flickr notes that iPhone cameras overall accounted for 54% of the top 100 devices on the site. In a distant second place was Canon with a 23% share, followed by Nikon with 18%.

Even more impressive is that 9 out of the 10 most used cameras on Flickr were iPhone models, with the iPhone 6, iPhone 6s, and the iPhone 5s claiming the top three spots.

Flickr’s blog post reads in part:

When it comes to brands, Apple iPhones remained the dominant camera models, with 54% of the top 100 devices being named iPhone and an almost clean sweep of the top 10 Devices of 2017, accounting for 9 our of the top 10 devices. The Canon 5D Mark III placed 9th in the Top 10 Devices on Flickr of 2017.

The iPhone’s dominance aside, Flickr released some interesting data regarding some of the more popular photographs to appear on the site over the last 12 months, including a list of the top 25 photos of 2017 and a breakdown of the more popular photographs across different countries.

Android phones in 2018: Portrait pics on a single camera lens

The smartphone trend of two rear cameras for artistic portrait shots is so pervasive that even dirt-cheap budget phones sport dual lenses on the back. That could change next as early as next year as new chip technology from Qualcomm makes it possible to take a Bokeh portrait photo from a single camera lens.

It’s similar to the Google Pixel 2, which bucks the dual-camera standard now adopted by virtually every other high-end phone, though that device certainly gives us a model of what’s possible using software alone.

790d6_dslrvsiphonex-cnet Android phones in 2018: Portrait pics on a single camera lens

The technology comes down to AI algorithms processed within the Snapdragon 845 chip that Qualcomm announced this week at an annual summit. Qualcomm’s Snapdragon processors are used in the majority of high-end smartphones, where their capabilities form the backbone of what phones like the next Samsung Galaxy, LG, Motorola and OnePlus phones can do. Qualcomm faces competition on the high-end from Apple, Huawei and to a certain degree Samsung, which rely on their own house-made chipsets (a portion of Samsung phones run on the Exynos processor, typically for Asian markets).

Being able to take portrait shots on a single camera lens can help phonemakers shed the cost of a second camera array. Alternatively, phones with a second camera lens that’s used for adding detail but not portrait blur — like a monochrome camera — can offer the feature on the dominant lens.

790d6_dslrvsiphonex-cnet Android phones in 2018: Portrait pics on a single camera lens

The bokeh or depth-of-field effect — which softly blurs the background while keeping the photo’s subject in focus — is a carryover from DSLR cameras that Apple popularized with the iPhone 7 Plus. 

“In a smartphone, you need to calculate a depth map,” said Tim Leland, Qualcomm’s vice president of product management. “That depth map then gets fed into another system, which then applies a manipulation or blurring of those pixels in a different way that mimics the bokeh effect.”

Smartphone makers typically achieve bokeh with two lenses, which create a kind of stereo effect to generate a sense of depth. Qualcomm’s approach with its feature, which it calls Deep Portrait, is to run the image through a computational neural network that applies artificial intelligence to determine the subject from the background.

“You don’t want to blur somebody’s face for example or accidentally blur somebody’s hair,” Leland said.

Qualcomm isn’t suggesting that phones should ditch a two-camera system, or that bokeh portraits taken with software rather than camera hardware are higher quality. In fact, Leland noted that the algorithms could improve the blurring accuracy of two camera lenses.

“AI is one of those things where you can’t necessarily do something without it,” he said. “But it makes it better.”

As the Google Pixel and Pixel 2 prove with their Lens Blur feature, you can take bokeh portraits using software alone. Traditional computer vision can already recognize diff types of objects by looking at specific patterns of contrasting pixels. Artificial intelligence recognizes objects in their entirety over time. For example, show an AI program thousands of photos of chairs and over time it will recognize what is and isn’t a chair. Artificial intelligence aims to speed up the process.

Read next: What Qualcomm’s new Snapdragon chip could mean for Galaxy S9

And also: 4 ways your phone’s next camera could get more awesome

Comparison: iPhone X vs. iPhone 8 Plus camera quality

In this video, we take a closer look at the differences, and similarities, between the rear- and front-facing cameras included in Apple’s iPhone X and iPhone 8 Plus.

The iPhone X and iPhone 8 Plus share a number of camera hardware specifications, causing some to wonder what’s different — and what’s the same — between the two devices.

First of all, the iPhone X gets the brand new TrueDepth camera system, capable of Face ID authentication and other features like selfie portrait mode. That said, the front-facing color camera incorporated as part of TrueDepth appears to be identical to the imager in the iPhone 8 Plus, so general image quality should be the same.

The rear cameras are slightly upgraded in the iPhone X, but not by much. Both iPhones utilize 12-megapixel sensors, but the telephoto lens on the iPhone X gets optical image stabilization, meaning the camera sensor actually moves around and negates camera shake. The telephoto lens also goes from 57mm zoom to 52mm and scores a faster aperture of f/2.4 compared to f/2.8 on the 8 Plus.

Looking at Portrait Mode, the image taken by our iPhone X was out of focus, but we can see the difference in zoom between it and the photo captured by the iPhone 8 Plus. Specifically, the image coming out of the 8 plus is a slightly tighter shot.

8db1b_23891-30709-171205-Portrait-l Comparison: iPhone X vs. iPhone 8 Plus camera quality

Now with the wide lens, both photos look practically identical. We cropped in and noticed that the 8 Plus was a bit warmer than the X. This is either is a small change in software or just a slight variance in auto white balance.

8db1b_23891-30709-171205-Portrait-l Comparison: iPhone X vs. iPhone 8 Plus camera quality

Taking a selfie, the 8 Plus decided to expose the photo brighter, which looks better on the face, but completely blows out the sky. Sharpness and detail look identical, as expected.

The iPhone X of course has the new Selfie Portrait Mode feature. It looks pretty cool with all the bokeh in the back, but it also seems to blur the hair and body, which can be distracting for some people. The X also has the portrait lighting feature, which allows you to change the lighting of your face using different effects.

8db1b_23891-30709-171205-Portrait-l Comparison: iPhone X vs. iPhone 8 Plus camera quality

Moving to a regular shot captured with iPhone’s wide lens, there appears to be little difference between the X and the 8 Plus. Both look very sharp.

Now with the telephoto lens, we instantly notice the difference in zoom, but there is hardly any difference in detail.

8db1b_23891-30709-171205-Portrait-l Comparison: iPhone X vs. iPhone 8 Plus camera quality

Next, we see that both HDR photos are practically identical, but they both completely destroy last year’s iPhone 7 Plus.

8db1b_23891-30709-171205-Portrait-l Comparison: iPhone X vs. iPhone 8 Plus camera quality

Now onto a lowlight photo using the telephoto lens. This is where we were expecting to see a difference, and did. First of all, the faster aperture of f/2.4 versus f/2.8 increases the amount of light that goes into the sensor. Optical image stabilization allows the camera to use a slower shutter speed without blurring the image, which also increases the amount of light going into the sensor.

Both of these characteristics allow the camera to lower its ISO setting, which is used to artificially boost brightness that introduces noise, like we see in the image. The noise smears details and as you can see on the hoodie, it can mess with colors as well.

8db1b_23891-30709-171205-Portrait-l Comparison: iPhone X vs. iPhone 8 Plus camera quality

Moving on to video, detail and quality look the same, but the 8 Plus again seems to be a bit warmer. Testing autofocus, we notice that the iPhone X footage is a lot smoother with little side-to-side shake. The X also looks sharper and more detailed, likely due to motion blur inserted into the 8 Plus footage from its lack of optical image stabilization.

Interestingly, the 8 Plus seems to accomplish wide angle image stabilization better than the X. We’re not sure why that could be, but it’s noticeable. The 8 Plus again looks warmer, so it’s beginning to look like a trend.

Now evaluating stabilization on the telephoto lens, we can instantly see that the iPhone X is superior. The 8 Plus has noticeable and distracting motion blur. We can also see just how much of a zoom difference there is between the two.

Finally, wide angle detail in low-light settings appears to be the same, but we noticed that the X had less noise and maintained image color. We noticed the same thing on the telephoto lens, with a little bit less noise on the 8 Plus.

In conclusion, there isn’t much of a difference at all between the iPhone X and iPhone 8 Plus when using the wide lens. Sharpness and detail are the same, but we did notice that most of the 8 Plus photos were warmer. Some prefer the warmer look, but the X seems more color accurate to what you’d see in real life.

As expected, the most substantial upgrade is the iPhone X’s telephoto lens. The imager’s stabilization makes for a sharper image and keeps photos nice and sharp, while boosting low light image quality.

The iPhone X is definitely the clear winner here with the telephoto improvements and added features like Selfie Portrait mode.

DxO’s detachable One camera is available now for Android for $499 through an early access program

It’s been a long time coming, but Android users can finally get their hands on a USB-C version of DxO’s detachable smartphone camera — sort of. DxO isn’t doing an “official” launch of the Android camera just yet, but if you’d like to get in on the action early, you can sign up for the company’s “Early Access pack” for $499 over at the DxO website, according to Android Central.

That $499 gets you the USB-C version of the DxO One that was designed for Android phones a few months ago, along with a rugged Outdoor Shell access to DxO’s PhotoLab software. It’s the same price that the original DxO One for iOS runs for, which doesn’t make this a bad deal either.

The only caveat is that DxO is only listing a few phones that will support the camera for now: the HTC U11, Huawei Mate 9, Huawei P10, LG G9, :G V20, Moto Z, Nexus 5X, Nokia 8, Nubia Z11 mini, Samsung Galaxy A5 (2017), Samsung Note 8, Samsung S8, and Huawei Honor 9. There is an “other” field to submit phones not on that list, like the Google Pixel 2 XL, but it’s not clear whether or not the camera has been optimized to work with them yet.


b406d_Screen_Shot_2017_11_30_at_3.50.02_PM DxO's detachable One camera is available now for Android for $499 through an early access program

According to the company, the Android version of the camera already has “most features currently available in the iOS version,” with things like time lapses and Facebook Live broadcasts planned for future updates.

Blind camera comparison results: iPhone X vs Galaxy Note 8 vs LG V30

7.
GreenMan

(Posts: 1994; Member since: 09 Nov 2015)

In recent months; I’ve come to realize that its always, ALWAYS better to shoot in pro mode. Take matter in your own hands!

Now, manual mode may sound too intimidating but its not that hard in practice.

I personally adjust the shutter speed first (according to the nature of the subject I’m trying to capture) and then The ISO. And after taking a few hundred shots as a practice, I can take great shots on my S6! Better than auto mode in some scenarios!

Plus, it’s just fun!

G’Day!

Blind camera comparison results: iPhone X vs Galaxy Note 8 vs LG V30

7.
GreenMan

(Posts: 1994; Member since: 09 Nov 2015)

In recent months; I’ve come to realize that its always, ALWAYS better to shoot in pro mode. Take matter in your own hands!

Now, manual mode may sound too intimidating but its not that hard in practice.

I personally adjust the shutter speed first (according to the nature of the subject I’m trying to capture) and then The ISO. And after taking a few hundred shots as a practice, I can take great shots on my S6! Better than auto mode in some scenarios!

Plus, it’s just fun!

G’Day!

Apple’s iPhone X TrueDepth Camera for Face ID has Android OEMs Scrambling to copy this Feature for 2018 …

 

Apple’s leadership in the smartphone industry continues as their competitors abandon fingerprint ID in a nano second and race to adopt 3D sensors to match Apple’s Face ID for 2018 smartphones.

 

In a new supply chain report, sources claim that the US laser diode supplier Lumentum is now the only company that has won orders from Apple for VCSEL components as part of 3D modules for iPhone X. As a contract manufacturer of the component, Taiwan-based Win Semiconductor has enjoyed stable VCSEL shipments to Lumentum in 2017, and shipments are expected to grow in 2018, given that Apple is planning to incorporate 3D sensing technology into iPad.

 

The sources further noted that Lumemtum’s status as the only VCSEL component supplier for Apple may change as GaAs wafer foundry houses such as Visual Photonics Epitaxy, Advanced Wireless Semiconductor, IntelliEPI and other compound semiconductor suppliers to tap into the supply chain of 3D sensing modules.

 

Austria-based sensor solutions provider AMS is actively expanding its supply capacities to vie for more orders from Apple and non-Apple camps. As Taiwan-based Advanced Wireless Semiconductor (AWS) is a supply chain partner of Princeton Optronics, an AMS-acquired supplier of VCSELs and VCSEL-based optical modules based in the US, AWS is likely to score robust shipments in the coming year, industry sources said.

 

With Android-based smartphones vendors expected to incorporate 3D sensors into their smartphone models following Apple’s adoption of TrueDepth facial recognition system of iPhone X, Taiwan players in the related supply chain, including upstream suppliers of gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafers and makers of VCSEL (vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser) components, as well as those providing backend packaging and testing of DOE (diffractive optical element) and WLO (wafer level optics) components are poised to embrace tremendous business opportunities in 2018, according to the supply chain sources.

 

Qualcomm is scrambling to have matching TrueDepth camera technology for 2018 Android smartphones.They had been racing to introduce fingerprint ID under the display glass and dropped it like a led balloon with Apple taking another direction. This is copying the leader, plain and simple.

 


 

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Apple’s iPhone X TrueDepth Camera for Face ID has Android OEMs Scrambling to copy this Feature for 2018 …

 

Apple’s leadership in the smartphone industry continues as their competitors abandon fingerprint ID in a nano second and race to adopt 3D sensors to match Apple’s Face ID for 2018 smartphones.

 

In a new supply chain report, sources claim that the US laser diode supplier Lumentum is now the only company that has won orders from Apple for VCSEL components as part of 3D modules for iPhone X. As a contract manufacturer of the component, Taiwan-based Win Semiconductor has enjoyed stable VCSEL shipments to Lumentum in 2017, and shipments are expected to grow in 2018, given that Apple is planning to incorporate 3D sensing technology into iPad.

 

The sources further noted that Lumemtum’s status as the only VCSEL component supplier for Apple may change as GaAs wafer foundry houses such as Visual Photonics Epitaxy, Advanced Wireless Semiconductor, IntelliEPI and other compound semiconductor suppliers to tap into the supply chain of 3D sensing modules.

 

Austria-based sensor solutions provider AMS is actively expanding its supply capacities to vie for more orders from Apple and non-Apple camps. As Taiwan-based Advanced Wireless Semiconductor (AWS) is a supply chain partner of Princeton Optronics, an AMS-acquired supplier of VCSELs and VCSEL-based optical modules based in the US, AWS is likely to score robust shipments in the coming year, industry sources said.

 

With Android-based smartphones vendors expected to incorporate 3D sensors into their smartphone models following Apple’s adoption of TrueDepth facial recognition system of iPhone X, Taiwan players in the related supply chain, including upstream suppliers of gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafers and makers of VCSEL (vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser) components, as well as those providing backend packaging and testing of DOE (diffractive optical element) and WLO (wafer level optics) components are poised to embrace tremendous business opportunities in 2018, according to the supply chain sources.

 

Qualcomm is scrambling to have matching TrueDepth camera technology for 2018 Android smartphones.They had been racing to introduce fingerprint ID under the display glass and dropped it like a led balloon with Apple taking another direction. This is copying the leader, plain and simple.

 


 

About Making Comments on our Site: Patently Apple reserves the right to post, dismiss or edit any comments. Those using abusive language or negative behavior will result in being blacklisted on Disqus.

 

 

Here’s how future iPhones could use camera depth data to create impressive Portrait Mode videos

One of the headline features of the dual camera system in recent iPhones is Portrait Mode, an effect that simulates a DSLR-style shallow depth of field by intelligently blurring the background of your photos. Apple took the feature a step further with the iPhone X, adding Portrait Mode selfies and introducing simulated Portrait Lighting.

While these features are currently limited to still photos, future iPhones could someday use the same technology to bring the depth effect to videos, a stunning look currently only possible with high-end video gear or a considerable amount of work in post-production. This feature could be a game changer for videographers, editors, and consumers alike, who have already embraced the iPhone as a serious filmmaking tool. With some effort, the effect is actually possible with today’s iPhones. Here’s how it can be done.


bec37_tweetbot Here's how future iPhones could use camera depth data to create impressive Portrait Mode videos

Tweetbot For iOS

When you take a photo in Portrait Mode on an iPhone today, the depth information associated with the image is stored as a grayscale depth map. iOS uses this depth map to determine which parts of the photo should be blurred and which should remain in focus. This is the same way that 3D artists fake depth of field in 3D renders – the animation software creates a depth map that’s later interpreted by the renderer.

If you want to create the same effect in a video today, there are two common options. The first and easiest is to spend the money on expensive cameras and lenses with a wide aperture – that’s what gives you a shallow depth of field.

A depth map generated by 3D rendering software. Darker areas are in focus and lighter areas are blurred.

The second and more tedious option is to use post-production software like Adobe After Effects to build your own depth maps or video masks in order to specify which parts of a scene should be in focus. This can involve a strenuous process called rotoscoping, a time-consuming task that is often done frame-by-frame.

iOS 11 includes improved developer frameworks that give more access to depth data captured by the iPhone’s cameras. Apple showed off these new capabilities at WWDC 2017 with a sample app called AVCamPhotoFilter. Essentially, this lets developers capture streaming depth data from the camera at a limited resolution. This sample app is the basis for my solution.

Using both an iPhone X running AVCamPhotoFilter and an iPhone 7 Plus in the standard camera application, I stacked the devices, keeping the lenses as close together as possible. I recorded the same scene on each, screen capturing the depth data on my iPhone X to make a moving depth map. The video below demonstrates the process involved and the depth effect that results.

Bringing both pieces of footage into Adobe After Effects, I was able to add shallow depth of field quite easily to my video by applying a camera lens blur to my footage, and telling After Effects the depth map source. This is essentially what iOS does with depth data today, just behind the scenes.

The result isn’t perfect, but took a fraction of the time that building a depth map by hand would take. The output would be more accurate if both the source video and depth data came from the same camera lens, but AVCamPhotoFilter doesn’t support capturing both concurrently. While there are significant limitations to this workaround, the end result is surprisingly almost as polished as the depth effect is on still photos.

Unlocking Portrait Mode for video on current iPhone hardware may prove to be challenging. The feature is already computationally intensive for still photos, and would be significantly more taxing in a video. Third-party applications like Fabby have attempted to recreate the effect entirely in software, but aren’t convincing. However, Apple’s A-series chips and camera hardware continue to advance by leaps and bounds on a yearly basis, so this feature might not be too far out of reach.

The possibilities of Portrait mode videos extend far beyond simple shallow depth of field effects. The same data could eventually be used to simulate Portrait Lighting in videos – just like in Apple’s own TV ad.

Creative manipulation of depth data could even make possible effects like tilt-shift videos and instant masking of subjects as if they were standing in front of a green screen. Apple has already used this technique to great effect in a recent update to their Clips app on iPhone X, adding “Selfie Scenes” that can place you downtown in a city or even on the set of Star Wars.

Finally, Portrait Mode for video could further establish the iPhone as an essential filmmaking tool. Traditional cameras do not capture depth data at all, giving the iPhone an immediate advantage over even high-end video gear.

Apple has made their dedication to the iPhone’s camera clear, funding a short film shot entirely on iPhone, and devoting significant engineering resources to new camera features with every new model. Portrait Mode videos would take the iPhone one step closer to the goal of not only being the best camera you have with you, but the best camera, period.


Check out 9to5Mac on YouTube for more Apple news:

Here’s how future iPhones could use camera depth data to create impressive Portrait Mode videos

One of the headline features of the dual camera system in recent iPhones is Portrait Mode, an effect that simulates a DSLR-style shallow depth of field by intelligently blurring the background of your photos. Apple took the feature a step further with the iPhone X, adding Portrait Mode selfies and introducing simulated Portrait Lighting.

While these features are currently limited to still photos, future iPhones could someday use the same technology to bring the depth effect to videos, a stunning look currently only possible with high-end video gear or a considerable amount of work in post-production. This feature could be a game changer for videographers, editors, and consumers alike, who have already embraced the iPhone as a serious filmmaking tool. With some effort, the effect is actually possible with today’s iPhones. Here’s how it can be done.


bec37_tweetbot Here's how future iPhones could use camera depth data to create impressive Portrait Mode videos

Tweetbot For iOS

When you take a photo in Portrait Mode on an iPhone today, the depth information associated with the image is stored as a grayscale depth map. iOS uses this depth map to determine which parts of the photo should be blurred and which should remain in focus. This is the same way that 3D artists fake depth of field in 3D renders – the animation software creates a depth map that’s later interpreted by the renderer.

If you want to create the same effect in a video today, there are two common options. The first and easiest is to spend the money on expensive cameras and lenses with a wide aperture – that’s what gives you a shallow depth of field.

A depth map generated by 3D rendering software. Darker areas are in focus and lighter areas are blurred.

The second and more tedious option is to use post-production software like Adobe After Effects to build your own depth maps or video masks in order to specify which parts of a scene should be in focus. This can involve a strenuous process called rotoscoping, a time-consuming task that is often done frame-by-frame.

iOS 11 includes improved developer frameworks that give more access to depth data captured by the iPhone’s cameras. Apple showed off these new capabilities at WWDC 2017 with a sample app called AVCamPhotoFilter. Essentially, this lets developers capture streaming depth data from the camera at a limited resolution. This sample app is the basis for my solution.

Using both an iPhone X running AVCamPhotoFilter and an iPhone 7 Plus in the standard camera application, I stacked the devices, keeping the lenses as close together as possible. I recorded the same scene on each, screen capturing the depth data on my iPhone X to make a moving depth map. The video below demonstrates the process involved and the depth effect that results.

Bringing both pieces of footage into Adobe After Effects, I was able to add shallow depth of field quite easily to my video by applying a camera lens blur to my footage, and telling After Effects the depth map source. This is essentially what iOS does with depth data today, just behind the scenes.

The result isn’t perfect, but took a fraction of the time that building a depth map by hand would take. The output would be more accurate if both the source video and depth data came from the same camera lens, but AVCamPhotoFilter doesn’t support capturing both concurrently. While there are significant limitations to this workaround, the end result is surprisingly almost as polished as the depth effect is on still photos.

Unlocking Portrait Mode for video on current iPhone hardware may prove to be challenging. The feature is already computationally intensive for still photos, and would be significantly more taxing in a video. Third-party applications like Fabby have attempted to recreate the effect entirely in software, but aren’t convincing. However, Apple’s A-series chips and camera hardware continue to advance by leaps and bounds on a yearly basis, so this feature might not be too far out of reach.

The possibilities of Portrait mode videos extend far beyond simple shallow depth of field effects. The same data could eventually be used to simulate Portrait Lighting in videos – just like in Apple’s own TV ad.

Creative manipulation of depth data could even make possible effects like tilt-shift videos and instant masking of subjects as if they were standing in front of a green screen. Apple has already used this technique to great effect in a recent update to their Clips app on iPhone X, adding “Selfie Scenes” that can place you downtown in a city or even on the set of Star Wars.

Finally, Portrait Mode for video could further establish the iPhone as an essential filmmaking tool. Traditional cameras do not capture depth data at all, giving the iPhone an immediate advantage over even high-end video gear.

Apple has made their dedication to the iPhone’s camera clear, funding a short film shot entirely on iPhone, and devoting significant engineering resources to new camera features with every new model. Portrait Mode videos would take the iPhone one step closer to the goal of not only being the best camera you have with you, but the best camera, period.


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Samsung W2018 Android Flip Phone With Bixby Integration and F/1.5 Camera Lens Launched

Samsung has announced the W2018 as its new high-end Android flip phone in China. The South Korean company has partnered with China Telecom to launch the new smartphone on its 25th anniversary in the country. The new smartphone is the successor to the W2017 that was unveiled last year with a dual-display setup and a fingerprint scanner.

As showcased at an event in Xiamen, China last week, reported by Chinese news agency Sina, the Samsung W2018 features two 4.2-inch AMOLED display panels with full-HD (1080×1920 pixels) resolution. The smartphone is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 SoC, paired with Adreno 540 GPU and 6GB of RAM. Further, Samsung has provided 64GB and 256GB storage options along with microSD card support (up to 256GB). The handset runs Android 7.1.1 Nougat operating system with a proprietary skin on top and offers Bixby virtual assistant support in Chinese.

The Samsung W2018 sports a 12-megapixel camera sensor on the back with a largest, f/1.5 aperture lens – the largest seen yet on a smartphone camera. There is also optical image stabilisation (OIS) support to reduce blurs even when the shots are captured with some jerks or shakes. Moreover, the handset has a 5-megapixel camera sensor on the front with f/1.9 lens. The back camera sensor also supports 4K video recording, while the front sensor has full-HD (1080p) support.

Samsung has opted for a hybrid dual-SIM configuration on the W2018 with two Nano-SIM card options and microSD card support. The smartphone packs a 2300mAh battery and includes a fingerprint scanner as well as a heart rate sensor. In terms of connectivity, there is 4G LTE, Wi-Fi 802.11ac, Bluetooth v4.2, GPS/GLONASS, NFC, and USB Type-C.

The Samsung W2018 comes with a 3D glass and metal design and has been made available in Gold and Silver colour options.

Price and availability details about the Samsung W2018 are yet to be announced. However, considering the previous models (including the W2017 and W2016), the new smartphone is expected to come with a premium price tag and be exclusive to the Chinese market.

Razer Phone’s camera app gets a performance enhancing update

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DxO One Camera for Android is Now Available in an ‘Early Access’ Program ($499)

The primary reason why smartphone enthusiasts know about DxO Labs is because it’s the company behind DxOMark, the popular smartphone camera reviewing website. It isn’t the only service DxO Labs offers, though. The company now also has DxO One, a camera attachment for the iPhone, and has their own image editing software too.

033ff_DxO-One-Android DxO One Camera for Android is Now Available in an 'Early Access' Program ($499)

In October, DxO Labs announced that the DxO One would be coming soon for Android, two and a half years after its release for the iPhone in June 2015. It has a 20MP 1-inch sensor (similar to the Sony RX100 series) with a f/1.8 max aperture.

The DxO One is pocketable because it doesn’t have a primary display of its own. Instead, it has a small onboard OLED display and it relies on a smartphone’s display for the viewfinder in order to frame photos. The Android version connects to smartphones via the USB Type-C port. The primary reason it can take better photos than most smartphones is because it has a larger sensor with 1-inch sensor size, compared to smartphone sensors, which range in size from 1/2.3-inch to 1/3.1-inch. It supports RAW photography via Super RAW, and records up to 4x slow motion video.

Now, DxO Labs has announced that the One camera is now available in an ‘Early Access’ program for $499. The $499 price includes the camera, a waterproof case for submerging the camera attachment up to 45-meters, and DxO Photolab – the company’s image processing software. Normally, the case and DxO Photolab have price tags of $59.90 and $199 respectively.

Users can head to DxO’s website and enter their email and phone model to order the DxO One camera. Strangely, the DxO One will support only a limited list of smartphones for now, instead of supporting every Android smartphone with a USB-C port. The current list of supported phones includes the HTC U11, Huawei Mate 9, Huawei P10, LG G6, LG V20, Moto Z, Nexus 5X, Nokia 8, Nubia Z11 mini, Samsung Galaxy A5 2017, Samsung Note 8, Samsung Galaxy S8 and Huawei Honor 9. If users have any other smartphone, they can select “other” and then specify their brand of phone.

The Android version of the DxO One will have full image and video capture capabilities out-of-the-box, but it won’t have support for Facebook live streaming and time-lapse right away. DxO Labs says that it will add the aforementioned features and more in the coming months.


Source: DxO LabsVia: Android Central

DxO’s snap-on Android camera is now available to pre-order

The DxO One is one of the few survivors of the “camera phone” era of a few years ago, with the most notable contenders at the time being Sony’s QX10 and QX100 models. DxO’s model likely struck a chord because of its more practical direct physical interface and relatively compact, pocketable size.

At the same time, you’re getting a large 1-inch, 20.2-megapixel sensor and f/1.8, 32mm equivalent fixed lens that gives you photo quality akin to a nice compact camera like Sony’s RX100 V — better than any small-sensor smartphone can manage. However, if you’re okay with pairing your phone wirelessly, you’d be better off spending a bit more on a dedicated camera like one of Sony’s previous RX100 III and IV models or Panasonic’s Lumix LX10.

Supported mobile phones are the HTC U11, Huawei Mate 9, Huawei P10, LG G6, LG V20, Moto Z, Nexus 5X, Nokia 8, Nubia Z11 mini, Samsung Galaxy A5 2017, Samsung Note 8, Samsung Galaxy S8 and Huawei Honor 9. You can also select “other” and specify your brand of phone, and hope for the best.

As mentioned, the DxO One for Android is on pre-order for $499 including the Outdoor Shell and cable back door, along with the DxO PhotoLab software. It’ll be able to do most of what the iOS version can, but some recently announced features like time lapse and Facebook Live streaming will come later.

DxO’s detachable One camera is available now for Android for $499 …

It’s been a long time coming, but Android users can finally get their hands on a USB-C version of DxO’s detachable smartphone camera — sort of. DxO isn’t doing an “official” launch of the Android camera just yet, but if you’d like to get in on the action early, you can sign up for the company’s “Early Access pack” for $499 over at the DxO website, according to Android Central.

That $499 gets you the USB-C version of the DxO One that was designed for Android phones a few months ago, along with a rugged Outdoor Shell access to DxO’s PhotoLab software. It’s the same price that the original DxO One for iOS runs for, which doesn’t make this a bad deal either.

The only caveat is that DxO is only listing a few phones that will support the camera for now: the HTC U11, Huawei Mate 9, Huawei P10, LG G9, :G V20, Moto Z, Nexus 5X, Nokia 8, Nubia Z11 mini, Samsung Galaxy A5 (2017), Samsung Note 8, Samsung S8, and Huawei Honor 9. There is an “other” field to submit phones not on that list, like the Google Pixel 2 XL, but it’s not clear whether or not the camera has been optimized to work with them yet.


e4bce_Screen_Shot_2017_11_30_at_3.50.02_PM DxO's detachable One camera is available now for Android for $499 ...

According to the company, the Android version of the camera already has “most features currently available in the iOS version,” with things like time lapses and Facebook Live broadcasts planned for future updates.

Camera comparison: Apple’s iPhone X vs. Samsung’s Galaxy Note 8

Both Apple’s iPhone X and the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 feature dual-lens rear cameras, but which one takes better photos? AppleInsider puts the two flagship smartphones to the test.

Samsung’s Note line of phablets has been around for years, but the Note 8 is the first model to include a dual rear camera array, similar to the one introduced with Apple’s iPhone 7 Plus.

Apple’s latest iPhone X handset features a dual-camera system like the iPhone 8 Plus and 7 Plus before it, but with some noteworthy improvements such as the addition of optical image stabilization on both lenses.

The specs of the rear cameras on the iPhone X and Note 8 are are pretty similar. They’re both 12-megapixel modules with a 2x optical zoom feature, and both phones have dual optical image stabilization.

With the Note 8, Samsung introduces Live Focus, its own version of Apple’s rear-facing Portrait Mode feature. Live Focus lets users adjust the amount of background blur in real time, as well as in post, a benefit Apple’s Portrait Mode does not afford. With iOS 11, iPhone owners can enable and disable the blur effect, but the amount of blur is a preset standard.

The Note 8 also gets a Dual Capture feature which takes two photo using both lenses while in Live Focus mode, allowing users to switch between wide and telephoto views in post. Additional customization options are also available using Pro mode with the Note 8.

Comparing the phones’ front-facing cameras, the Note 8 edges iPhone X out in sheer megapixels with its 8-megapixel shooter. The iPhone X incorporates a 7-megapixel camera as part of the sophisticated TrueDepth depth-sensing camera system, which allows for Face ID authentication and a other features like Selfie Portrait Mode.

To compete with Apple’s new selfie feature, the Note 8 also has a selective focus front-facing mode that relies largely on software to achieve the desired effect.

abaf4_23851-30617-x_vs_note_8_camera_720-l Camera comparison: Apple's iPhone X vs. Samsung's Galaxy Note 8

Starting with rear-facing Portrait and Live Focus modes, we instantly noticed that the Note 8 was over-saturating the colors. The iPhone X’s colors are much more accurate to what we saw through our eyes. The Note 8 did, however, do a better job of taking care of the glare near the bottom of some photos.

Cropping in, we can definitely tell that the Note 8 looks sharper. The X’s image looks slightly out of focus, but it’s the best out of three photos that we took, so it may just be a side effect of unwanted glare.

abaf4_23851-30617-x_vs_note_8_camera_720-l Camera comparison: Apple's iPhone X vs. Samsung's Galaxy Note 8

Moving on to the wide lens, we don’t see much of a difference save for the over-saturation on the Note 8. We also can tell that the iPhone X has more contrast if you look at the ground. Cropping in, we see a bunch of noise on the hoodie with the Note 8. The iPhone X does look slightly sharper as well.

Moving on to selfie mode, the Note 8’s colors don’t seem too bad this time, but you can tell that the iPhone X has more contrast. We can also see more detail in the sky on the X, compared to the Note 8 which looks pretty blown out. Cropping in, the iPhone X looks just a bit more detailed than the Note 8.

Looking at a wide photo of a tree, the colors are very different, with the iPhone X being the most accurate. We can also tell that the X has more contrast compared to the Note 8’s image, which lacks detail. Cropping in, the X looks more detailed, but it could be due to the lack of contrast on the Note 8.

abaf4_23851-30617-x_vs_note_8_camera_720-l Camera comparison: Apple's iPhone X vs. Samsung's Galaxy Note 8

The same tree with a telephoto lens shows iPhone X’s colors are more true to life, and the contrast makes it look more pleasing to the eye. Cropping in, we can actually see that the Note 8 is a bit sharper, but due to the lack of contrast, it’s hard to tell at normal viewing levels.

In HDR mode, we can instantly see that the iPhone X holds a lot more details in the sky. The Note 8 again over-saturates the colors, and it’s exposed a bit darker. Cropping in, we can see a lot more detail on the iPhone X.

abaf4_23851-30617-x_vs_note_8_camera_720-l Camera comparison: Apple's iPhone X vs. Samsung's Galaxy Note 8

Next up is a couple of selfies using Selfie Portrait and Selective Focus modes.

We can see that the two systems work a bit differently. The Note 8 actually adds a bokeh ball effect along with blur, and it maintains details in the foreground, like the jacket, compared to the iPhone X which holds focus on the face and softens everything else. Cropping in, the Note 8’s image looks a bit more detailed.

The Note 8’s blur effect is stronger than on the X, which makes for a seemingly better photo.

In low-light scenarios the Note 8 looks a bit over-saturated, but it actually has less noise on the hoodie compared to the X. The rocks in the background are more detailed as well. Cropping in, we can tell that the Note 8’s image is sharper, and the X looks soft and the detail is a bit smeared.

abaf4_23851-30617-x_vs_note_8_camera_720-l Camera comparison: Apple's iPhone X vs. Samsung's Galaxy Note 8

With the wide lens, the iPhone X’s image looks a bit overexposed and a tad bit blurry. Cropping in, we can tell that the Note 8 is more sharp, and the letters on the hoodie are blown out on the iPhone X.

Finally, we turned on flash to see which photo is more pleasant. The image from the Note 8 is distractingly yellow and completely misses the mark in terms of accuracy. The iPhone X is much more accurate, and it does a better job of balancing the brightness of the background and foreground. Cropping in, we do see more detail in the Note 8’s image, with the iPhone X’s detail looking a bit smeared.

abaf4_23851-30617-x_vs_note_8_camera_720-l Camera comparison: Apple's iPhone X vs. Samsung's Galaxy Note 8

In conclusion, the Note 8’s photos are just as sharp or sharper than the iPhone X in various situations, but it over-saturates colors and has a tendency to lack contrast. The iPhone X does a better job at high dynamic range photos, but detail can get more smeared when in low light than on the Note 8. Interestingly, the blur effect on the Note 8 looks just as good as the iPhone X, if not better, thanks to the bokeh ball effect and stronger blur intensity.




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