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Hop Fastpass to be available in Android Pay

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — TriMet Hop Fastpass will be available with Android Pay starting early next year.

TriMet and Google teamed up to make making the Hop Fastpass™ the first virtual transit card available in Android Pay. The move also marks the first mobile wallet partnership for TriMet.

Users will be able to tap their phones to pay for their fares and receive all the benefits of a physical Hop card.

Get more information here.

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1926f_generic-max-trimet-convention-center-05252015 Hop Fastpass to be available in Android Pay

1926f_generic-max-trimet-convention-center-05252015 Hop Fastpass to be available in Android Pay

1926f_generic-max-trimet-convention-center-05252015 Hop Fastpass to be available in Android Pay

1926f_generic-max-trimet-convention-center-05252015 Hop Fastpass to be available in Android Pay

[Update: Google Store and Walmart too] Google Home Max is now available for $399 at select retailers

Google made a big fuss about the Home Max when it announced it in October, but it didn’t launch the speaker then and promised it would be available in December. Well, December is almost halfway through and we’re starting to see the Home Max pop up on a couple of stores.

If you want the badass Google Home Max, your options now are Best Buy (chalk and charcoal) and Verizon (chalk only, charcoal is out of stock). Both let you add it to your cart and check out, with Best Buy offering free delivery by Monday December 18 or pick up in store around Wednesday 20 depending on your nearest store. The Google Store still says “join waitlist,” BH has “notify when available,” Newegg and Walmart don’t seem to have it listed, and Abt says it’s an authorized dealer and can’t sell it to you online but you can call and see if it’s available in store.

The price, as previously announced is $399. For that you get what is promised to be one of the best sounding speakers with dual 4.5″ woofers and custom 0.7″ tweeters that should give it 20x the power of a regular Google Home. (Oh boy!) The Max has Assistant and Chromecast built-in, Bluetooth, and 3.5mm input, and you can place it horizontally or vertically. If you’re interested, check the links above or below.

EFF to Court: Accessing Publicly Available Information on the Internet Is Not a Crime

EFF is fighting another attempt by a giant corporation to take advantage of our poorly drafted federal computer crime statute for commercial advantage—without any regard for the impact on the rest of us. This time the culprit is LinkedIn. The social networking giant wants violations of its corporate policy against using automated scripts to access public information on its website to count as felony “hacking” under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, a 1986 federal law meant to criminalize breaking into private computer systems to access non-public information.

EFF, together with our friends DuckDuckGo and the Internet Archive, have urged the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to reject LinkedIn’s request to transform the CFAA from a law meant to target “hacking” into a tool for enforcing its computer use policies. Using automated scripts to access publicly available data is not “hacking,” and neither is violating a website’s terms of use. LinkedIn would have the court believe that all “bots” are bad, but they’re actually a common and necessary part of the Internet. “Good bots” were responsible for 23 percent of Web traffic in 2016. Using them to access publicly available information on the open Internet should not be punishable by years in federal prison.

LinkedIn’s position would undermine open access to information online, a hallmark of today’s Internet, and threaten socially valuable bots that journalists, researchers, and Internet users around the world rely on every day—all in the name of preserving LinkedIn’s advantage over a competing service. The Ninth Circuit should make sure that doesn’t happen.

Background: Bad Court Decisions Open Door to Abuse

The CFAA makes it illegal to engage in “unauthorized access” to a computer connected to the Internet, but the statute doesn’t tells us what “authorization” or “without authorization” means. This vague language might have seemed innocuous to some back in 1986 when the statute was passed, but in today’s networked world, where we all regularly connect to and use computers owned by others, this pre-Web law is causing serious problems

In some jurisdictions, the CFAA has metastasized into a tool for companies and websites to enforce their computer use policies, like terms of service (which no one reads) or corporate computer policies. But other courts—including the Ninth Circuit back in 2012—have rejected turning the CFAA “into a sweeping Internet-policing mandate.” The Ninth Circuit instead chose to “maintain[] the CFAA’s focus on hacking,” holding that violating a company’s or website’s terms of use cannot give rise to liability. The court recognized that basing criminal liability on violations of computer use policies would turn innocuous activities like checking the score of a baseball game at work or fudging your age on your social media profile into a felony offenses—and make criminals out of all of us.

Then in 2016, the Ninth Circuit reversed course and delivered two dangerously expansive interpretations of the CFAA in cases involving password sharing. Despite our warnings that the decisions would be easily misused, the court refused to reconsider either case, stressing that the decisions would be limited to their “stark” facts.

Within weeks after the decisions were reached, LinkedIn began using these two decisions in an attempt to get around the Ninth Circuit’s 2012 ruling—and to use the CFAA to enforce its terms of service prohibition on scraping and thereby block competing services from perfectly legal uses of publicly available data on its website.

One company targeted by LinkedIn was hiQ Labs, which provides analysis of data on LinkedIn users’ publicly available profiles. LinkedIn sent hiQ cease and desist letters warning that any future access of its website, even the public portions, were “without permission and without authorization” and thus violations of the CFAA. hiQ challenged LinkedIn’s attempt to use the CFAA as a tool to enforce its terms of use in court. hiQ won a preliminary injunction against LinkedIn in district court, and LinkedIn appealed.

The Problems with LinkedIn’s Position

As we told the court in our amicus brief, Linkedin’s interpretation of the CFAA is problematic for a number of reasons.

First, allowing a website to use the CFAA as a terms of service enforcement mechanism would do precisely what the Ninth Circuit in 2012 sought to avoid: it would “transform the CFAA from an anti- hacking statute into an expansive misappropriation statute” for enforcing the use of publicly available information across the Web. Accessing public information on the open Internet cannot—and should not—give rise to liability under a law meant to target breaking into private computers to access non-public information.

Second, imposing CFAA liability for accessing publicly available information via automated scripts would potentially criminalize all automated “scraping” tools—including a wide range of valuable tools and services that Internet users, journalists, and researchers around the world rely on every day. Automated scraping is the process of using Internet “bots”—software applications that runs automated tasks over the Internet—to extract content and data from a website. LinkedIn tried to paint all bots as bad, but as we explained to the Ninth Circuit, bots are an essential and socially valuable component of the Internet. The Web crawlers that power tools we all rely on every day, including Google Search and Amici DuckDuckGo and Internet Archive, are Internet bots. News aggregation tools, including Google’s Crisis Map, which aggregated critical information about the California’s October 2016 wildfires, are Internet bots. ProPublica journalists used automated scrappers to investigate Amazon’s algorithm for ranking products by price and uncovered that Amazon’s pricing algorithm was hiding the best deals from many of its customers. The researchers who studied racial discrimination on Airbnb also used bots, and found that distinctively African American names were 16 percent less likely to be accepted relative to identical guests with distinctively white names.

Third, by potentially criminalizing what are in fact everyday online tools, LinkedIn’s position violates the long held “Rule of Lenity,” which requires that criminal statutes be interpreted to give clear notice of what conduct is criminal.

Old Laws Can’t Do New Tricks

The CFAA is an old, blunt instrument, and trying to use it to solve a modern, complicated dispute between two companies will undermine open access to information on the Internet for everyone. As we said in our amicus brief:

The power to limit access to publicly available information on the Internet under color of the law should be dictated by carefully considered rules that balance the various competing policy interests. These rules should not allow the handful of companies that collect massive amounts of user data to reap the benefits of making that information publicly available online—i.e., more Internet traffic and thus more data and more eyes for advertisers—while at the same time limiting use of that public information via the force of criminal law.

LinkedIn’s Position Won’t Actually Protect Privacy

Both LinkedIn and the Electronic Privacy Information Center argue that imposing criminal liability for automated access of publicly available LinkedIn data would protect the privacy interests of LinkedIn users who decide to publish their information publicly, but that’s just not true. LinkedIn still wouldn’t have any meaningful control over who accesses the data and how they use it, because the data will still be freely available on the open Internet for malicious actors and anyone not within the jurisdiction of the United States to access and use however they wish. LinkedIn’s contractual use restrictions on automated access may provide an illusion of privacy—and deter law-abiding individuals and U.S.-based companies from using automated tools to access that data—but nothing more.

LinkedIn knows this. Its privacy policy acknowledges the inherent lack of privacy in data posted publicly and makes no promises to users about LinkedIn’s ability to protect it: “Please do not post or add personal data to your profile that you would not want to be publicly available.” LinkedIn shouldn’t be spreading misconceptions about the “privacy” of publicly posted data in court pleadings to advance its corporate interests.

LinkedIn Can’t Have Its Cake and Eat It, Too

The only way for LinkedIn to truly protect the privacy of its users’ is to make their profiles non-public—i.e., to put their information behind a username and password barrier. But instead its profiles are public by default. As LinkedIn itself admits, it benefits from that data remaining public and freely accessible on the Internet: open access on its platforms means more Internet traffic (and thus more data and more eyes for advertisers). As we told the court, “LinkedIn wants to ‘participate in the open Web’ but at the same time abuse the CFAA to avoid ‘accept[ing] the open trespass norms of the Web.’” We hope the court does not allow it.

“Rock Solid” Debian 9.3 And “Lightweight” Bodhi Linux 4.4.0 Available — Download Here

Debian “stretch” 9.3

In early 2017, the Debian Release team pushed Debian 9.0 “stretch” release, which would remain supported for the next 5 years. Named after Toy Story’s rubber toy octopus, this release has just witnessed its third update in the form of Debian 9.3 (release notes).

As expected, Debian “stretch” 9.3 ships with tons of security patches and fixes for some serious issues. Prior to this release, on various instances, security advisories for different issues have already been released.

Talking about the bug fixes, there are a total of 68 bug fixes, including startup crash for certain video cards, Debian installer, different package rebuilds for the point release, Python dependencies for different packages, etc.

9e0e6_debian-9-stretch “Rock Solid” Debian 9.3 And “Lightweight” Bodhi Linux 4.4.0 Available — Download Here

On the security front, Debian 9.3 got a total of 56 updates, which affect important packages like Tor, WordPress, curl, wget, firefox, chromium, vlc, samba, etc.

Due to being unmaintained and other security issues, libnet-ping-external-perl package was removed.

If you’re habitual of installing the latest security updates from Debian at regular intervals, you don’t need to perform tons of update. The same goes for package updates.

A comprehensive mirror list for upgrade and installation can be found here.

Apart from the above-mentioned release, The Debian Project also announced the tenth update to oldstable Debian 8. The release announcement for Debian “jessie” 8.10 can be found here.

Bodhi Linux 4.4.0

9e0e6_debian-9-stretch “Rock Solid” Debian 9.3 And “Lightweight” Bodhi Linux 4.4.0 Available — Download Here

Moving to the latest release of the #1 ranked distro on our list of best lightweight operating systems.

The Bodhi Linux developers have shipped the freshly baked images in the form of Bodhi Linux 4.4.0. Delivered three months after Bodhi 4.3.1, it’s a normal update release with an aim to keep all the packages up-to-date. So, don’t expect major changes or new features.

Built on top of dependable Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial base, Bodhi 4.4.0 comes with EFL 1.19.1, Terminology 1.1.0, and Ephoto 1.5. It’s powered by Linux kernel 4.13.

You can head to this link and find the release announcement and ISO/torrent images for Bodhi Linux 4.4.0.

In case you’re having some feedback or you’d like us to cover some specific Linux lists, do let us know. Keep reading Fossbytes.

Also Read: 10 Best Linux Desktop Environments And Their Comparison

When you like your health plan — but it’s no longer available

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iPhone X, iPhone 8 to be available in Indonesia on Dec. 22

Apple’s latest smartphones, the iPhone X, iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, are coming to Indonesian stores on Dec. 22, as reported by kompas.com on Friday.

The products are distributed in Indonesia by Teletama Artha Mandiri (TAM) and are set to be available at official retailers under the overseeing company Erajaya Group, such as iBox, several Erafone outlets, as well as Urban Republic all across Indonesia. 

The prices of the anticipated products are not yet known, however, estimates would see them approximately 30 percent higher than global prices in general.

Read also: iPhone X launches in Singapore Apple store after fans form massive queues overnight

“Information on the pricing will follow,” Djatmiko Wardoyo, Erajaya Group marketing and communication director, told kompas.com on Friday. 

iPhone X, iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus were first introduced during an Apple event in September, with the phones first sold in several countries beginning November. 

Singapore was the first country in Southeast Asia to sell the smartphones, enticing buyers from neighboring countries such as Vietnam, Cambodia, the Philippines and Indonesia to travel for the purchase, which subsequently created long lines at Singapore’s Apple Store last month. (liz/kes)

Chrome 63 Now Available for Android, Linux, Mac, and Windows: What’s New

Google Chrome’s latest software update, version 63, is now rolling out to all users on desktop (Linux, Mac, Windows) and mobile (Android), with updates for Chrome OS to follow shortly.

Chrome 63 brings with it a ton of new features for both desktop and mobile platforms. The highlighting features for both platforms include Flags redesign, Quick Site Certificate, and a new Device Memory Javascript API. On the other hand, Chrome for Android Oreo adds features like Smart Text Selection and a new modal Permissions dialog.

Flags redesign

The chrome://flags webpage gets a facelift with the new Material Design that helps users distinguish between Available and Unavailable in-development Chrome experiments. The feature has been previously used to enable and disable these beta experiments on the Web browser. There is also a new Search bar and a quick button to reset all experiments in one go.

Device Memory JavaScript API

This feature has been added to help users on low-RAM devices. The API automatically detects the amount of memory in the device and can redirect to lite versions of websites in cases of high RAM usage; a great step in improving user experience. Chrome has been infamous, in the past, for consuming more RAM than other major Web browsers.

Site Isolation

This is an interesting new feature that takes forward the work of Google’s sandbox technology. Chrome 63 now lets you isolate certain webpages; content from them is rendered separately making sure that these pages do not share processes or cross-site iframes. This, obviously, comes at a cost: high memory usage. Google estimates that it will be 10-20 percent more than usual.

TLS 1.3 Rollout

TLS or Transport Layer Security is a protocol that configures secure communications for Gmail. The last update for TLS, version 1.2, came back in 2008, and Chrome 63 finally brings the latest in email security after a nine-year wait.

Smart Text Selection

Rolled out with Android 8.0 Oreo, Smart Text Selection is finally a feature in Chrome 63 for Android. Smart Text Selection recommends apps to users based on the text they select in any document, email or webpage. While the use case might be different from user to user, it is a really handy feature to have.

Chrome 63 will be available on your respective desktop/ mobile device in the coming days.

Chrome 63 Now Available for Android Linux, Mac, and Windows: What’s New

Google Chrome’s latest software update, version 63, is now rolling out to all users on desktop (Linux, Mac, Windows) and mobile (Android), with updates for Chrome OS to follow shortly.

Chrome 63 brings with it a ton of new features for both desktop and mobile platforms. The highlighting features for both platforms include Flags redesign, Quick Site Certificate, and a new Device Memory Javascript API. On the other hand, Chrome for Android Oreo adds features like Smart Text Selection and a new modal Permissions dialog.

Flags redesign

The chrome://flags webpage gets a facelift with the new Material Design that helps users distinguish between Available and Unavailable in-development Chrome experiments. The feature has been previously used to enable and disable these beta experiments on the Web browser. There is also a new Search bar and a quick button to reset all experiments in one go.

Device Memory JavaScript API

This feature has been added to help users on low-RAM devices. The API automatically detects the amount of memory in the device and can redirect to lite versions of websites in cases of high RAM usage; a great step in improving user experience. Chrome has been infamous, in the past, for consuming more RAM than other major Web browsers.

Site Isolation

This is an interesting new feature that takes forward the work of Google’s sandbox technology. Chrome 63 now lets you isolate certain webpages; content from them is rendered separately making sure that these pages do not share processes or cross-site iframes. This, obviously, comes at a cost: high memory usage. Google estimates that it will be 10-20 percent more than usual.

TLS 1.3 Rollout

TLS or Transport Layer Security is a protocol that configures secure communications for Gmail. The last update for TLS, version 1.2, came back in 2008, and Chrome 63 finally brings the latest in email security after a nine-year wait.

Smart Text Selection

Rolled out with Android 8.0 Oreo, Smart Text Selection is finally a feature in Chrome 63 for Android. Smart Text Selection recommends apps to users based on the text they select in any document, email or webpage. While the use case might be different from user to user, it is a really handy feature to have.

Chrome 63 will be available on your respective desktop/ mobile device in the coming days.

Android Oreo with EMUI 8.0 Now Available for the Chinese Huawei Mate 9

Over the past several months, we’ve seen quite a few OEMs roll out Android Oreo to their devices. It’s a pretty exclusive club at the moment, but it seems like more devices every day are getting Google’s latest and greatest. Case in point: A stable version of Android Oreo, based on EMUI 8.0, is now available for the Huawei Mate 9.

The Oreo update for the Mate 9 has been available in beta since since October, but it’s only recently gone public. The stable Oreo update is available for all four Chinese models of the Mate 9: The Mate 9 (MHA-AL00) Mate 9 Netcom Version (MHA-TL00), Mate 9 Pro (LON-AL00), and Mate 9 Porsche Edition. Keep in mind, though, that the update it’s not available over-the-air (OTA) at the moment — you’ll have to sideload it. Specifically, you’ll have to manually download it from the Mate 9’s Huawei Mobile Services application.

After updating, Mate 9 owners can look forward Oreo features such as picture-in-picture mode, password and username autofill, and battery-saving background task limits, along with EMUI 8.0 goodies like Smart Resolution, dual Bluetooth device connectivity, a Samsung DeX-like PC mode, Dynamic Wallpaper, navigation bar customizations, and more.

Unfortunately, folks carrying international variants of the Huawei Mate 9 will likely have to wait — the Oreo update’s not available outside of China. But given that Huawei promised to upgrade the entire Mate 9 lineup to Oreo before the end of the year, there’s a good chance it’ll roll out sooner than later.


Source: Gizmochina

Portal Knights console game now available on Android for $4.99

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Deal: Buy 3 Months, Get 3 Free. Unlimited Talk, Text.
Plans from $15/month

Microsoft’s collaborative Whiteboard app is now available for Windows 10 users


2f584_image_limitlesscanvas_876x505-copy1 Microsoft's collaborative Whiteboard app is now available for Windows 10 users

When it announced the new Surface Pro a few months back, Microsoft also used the opportunity to preview Whiteboard, a Windows 10 app designed to offer creative and business collaboration across devices. Since then, the app’s only been available as a private beta, but starting today, Microsoft’s offering it up as a public beta for anyone with a Windows 10 device.

Whiteboard is a compelling little app. It’s sort of a digital sibling to Microsoft’s pricey Surface Hub. The app will start rolling out to Windows 10 over the course of the next 24 hours, bringing the ability to essentially brainstorm, ideate, iterate and all of those other fun work things in real time across multiple devices running the same operating system.

The app uses a swap or a pen input, turning objects into standardized shapes in order to create tables, flowcharts, diagrams and the like; autosaving work to the cloud, others can pick up where you’ve left off. It looks like a pretty compelling app, and one that straddles the line between Microsoft’s traditional work focus and its current push to recruit more creative types through its Surface line of products.

Of course, these sort of work apps are really tough to get right, even with all of the advances to cloud-based collaborative over the past few years. Multi-device collaboration does require at least one person have an Office 360 subscription. Whiteboard is out of beta, but still in preview, so it’s not quite the final version. Microsoft’s still soliciting feedback, including feature requests through the app.

No word on whether or when the app might be coming to additional operating systems, but given Microsoft’s mobile strategy of late, I wouldn’t be too shocked to see it arrive on Android and iOS devices in the not too distant future.

Microsoft’s collaborative Whiteboard app is now available for Windows 10 users


2f584_image_limitlesscanvas_876x505-copy1 Microsoft's collaborative Whiteboard app is now available for Windows 10 users

When it announced the new Surface Pro a few months back, Microsoft also used the opportunity to preview Whiteboard, a Windows 10 app designed to offer creative and business collaboration across devices. Since then, the app’s only been available as a private beta, but starting today, Microsoft’s offering it up as a public beta for anyone with a Windows 10 device.

Whiteboard is a compelling little app. It’s sort of a digital sibling to Microsoft’s pricey Surface Hub. The app will start rolling out to Windows 10 over the course of the next 24 hours, bringing the ability to essentially brainstorm, ideate, iterate and all of those other fun work things in real time across multiple devices running the same operating system.

The app uses a swap or a pen input, turning objects into standardized shapes in order to create tables, flowcharts, diagrams and the like; autosaving work to the cloud, others can pick up where you’ve left off. It looks like a pretty compelling app, and one that straddles the line between Microsoft’s traditional work focus and its current push to recruit more creative types through its Surface line of products.

Of course, these sort of work apps are really tough to get right, even with all of the advances to cloud-based collaborative over the past few years. Multi-device collaboration does require at least one person have an Office 360 subscription. Whiteboard is out of beta, but still in preview, so it’s not quite the final version. Microsoft’s still soliciting feedback, including feature requests through the app.

No word on whether or when the app might be coming to additional operating systems, but given Microsoft’s mobile strategy of late, I wouldn’t be too shocked to see it arrive on Android and iOS devices in the not too distant future.

Vivaldi Browser Now Available For Raspberry Pi And ARM Based Linux Hardware

4ddea_Vivaldi-Browser Vivaldi Browser Now Available For Raspberry Pi And ARM Based Linux Hardware

Raspberry Pi enthusiasts and those of you using ARM based Linux devices, may be interested to know that Vivaldi has this week released an experimental build of the Vivaldi browser which is now available to download for Linux on ARM devices, including the awesome Pi mini PC. In addition to the Windows, macOS and Linux (x86/x86-64), operating systems. The Vivaldi browser is now available for a range of ARM based Linux devices and is now supported by the Raspberry Pi Zero, Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3 systems as well as CubieBoard, ASUS Tinker Board and more. Jon von Tetzchner, CEO at Vivaldi Technologies explains :

We are excited to unveil Vivaldi for the popular development board Raspberry Pi and other Linux based ARM devices. Enthusiastic Raspberry Pi users who are looking for a more feature-rich and flexible browser, will find Vivaldi a thrilling experience.

Features of the Vivaldi browser include :

– Advanced tab management – ability to group, tile, move and pin tabs.
– Side Panel with easy access to bookmarks, downloads, a “tree-style” access to tabs, notes, browsing history and websites of users’ choice.
– Built-in functionality such as the screenshot Capture tool, Notes and Image Properties.
– Powerful History overview that lets users explore their browsing patterns, backed by statistics and visual clues.
– Unique and customizable look and feel of the browser interface with custom Themes and more.
– Keyboard Shortcuts and Mouse Gestures for quick browser commands.

Running on Raspberry Pi, Vivaldi lets users optimize settings to boost overall performance. To reduce resource usage, they can turn off animated GIFs or use the advanced Reader View for a clutter-free reading environment. Vivaldi also has built-in functionality such as tab grouping, screenshot capture, ability to take notes right in the browser and so on – in combination, resulting in a speedy browsing experience.

The Vivaldi web browser is available to download free of charge and more information and download links are available from the official Vivaldi website which is accessible by following the link below.

Source: VB

Filed Under: Gadgets News

Latest Geeky Gadgets Deals

DxO’s detachable One camera is available now for Android for $499 through an early access program

It’s been a long time coming, but Android users can finally get their hands on a USB-C version of DxO’s detachable smartphone camera — sort of. DxO isn’t doing an “official” launch of the Android camera just yet, but if you’d like to get in on the action early, you can sign up for the company’s “Early Access pack” for $499 over at the DxO website, according to Android Central.

That $499 gets you the USB-C version of the DxO One that was designed for Android phones a few months ago, along with a rugged Outdoor Shell access to DxO’s PhotoLab software. It’s the same price that the original DxO One for iOS runs for, which doesn’t make this a bad deal either.

The only caveat is that DxO is only listing a few phones that will support the camera for now: the HTC U11, Huawei Mate 9, Huawei P10, LG G9, :G V20, Moto Z, Nexus 5X, Nokia 8, Nubia Z11 mini, Samsung Galaxy A5 (2017), Samsung Note 8, Samsung S8, and Huawei Honor 9. There is an “other” field to submit phones not on that list, like the Google Pixel 2 XL, but it’s not clear whether or not the camera has been optimized to work with them yet.


b406d_Screen_Shot_2017_11_30_at_3.50.02_PM DxO's detachable One camera is available now for Android for $499 through an early access program

According to the company, the Android version of the camera already has “most features currently available in the iOS version,” with things like time lapses and Facebook Live broadcasts planned for future updates.

SIM-Free iPhone X Now Available From Apple Online Store in the United States

Starting today, Apple is offering a SIM-free version of the iPhone X from its online store in the United States, allowing customers to buy an unlocked iPhone without choosing a carrier.

SIM-free versions of the iPhone X in all capacities list the same ~one week delivery estimate available for other iPhone X devices. SIM-free iPhone X models ordered today will arrive on December 12.

SIM-free iPhone X models will work with any carrier and have full support for both CDMA and GSM networks, much like the Sprint and Verizon versions of the new smartphone. iPhone X models from ATT and T-Mobile do not support CDMA networks and are not compatible with Sprint or Verizon.

Since iPhone X pre-orders kicked off on October 27, Apple has only allowed customers to buy an iPhone X with an ATT, Sprint, T-Mobile, or Verizon SIM, though models purchased in full are listed as unlocked. At launch, Apple was requiring carrier pre-activation to make an iPhone X purchase, but that requirement was lifted in mid-November.

It’s been possible to get the equivalent of a SIM-free unlocked iPhone X ordering a Verizon model and paying full price, but now there is an official SIM-free version.

Now that SIM-free iPhone X models are available, Apple is will also soon allow its employees to purchase the iPhone X through the internal employee site at a discount.

IMDbPro Launches an iPhone App, Available to Download Now

IMDbPro has launched its first-ever iPhone app for iOS devices. The iPhone app is free for IMDbPro subscribers ($150 a year) and is available to download now in the App Store.

IMDbPRo is a subscription service built on the foundation of the incredibly popular free IMDb, but adds layers of information and data useful for those working in, or trying to break into, the world of film and television. Key features include contact and representation details for more than 300,000 industry professionals, information about 25,000 in-development titles, along with profiles pages, and trade news about the entertainment industry.

IndieWire saw a demo of the new app, which appears to incorporate all the information users can currently access on the IMDdPro website into an intuitive iPhone app that offers the added benefit of tap-through to call or email directly from an iPhone.

IMDb, an Amazon-owned company, states that their Pro product has seen signficant growth in subscribers inside the industry, but wouldn’t supply numbers to IndieWire to demonstrate the extent of that reach or growth. However, IMDb sees 250 million monthly unique visitors and is a go-to site both for fans and those who follow the industry.

Interestingly, one of the newest IMDbPro features – which came about through customer feedback and requests – was the ability for IMDbPro members to customize how they showcase themselves on IMDb, IMDbPro, and Amazon Video – including the ability to select their featured images and the credits they are best “known for.” When a professional’s IMDb page is often their top google search and the profile page many turn to in order to learn more about actors, directors and below-the-line talent, that ability to shape your own IMDb page can be invaluable.

According to Matt Kumin, head of IMDbPro, the iPhone app’s development stemmed directly from customer feedback. IMDb’s founder and CEO, Col Needham – who has personally been testing the iPhone IMDdPro beta app for weeks – said the ability to use IMDbPro away from the computer and while on the road at industry events, festivals and meetings was a necessary step.

“IMDbPro members are busy professionals who are frequently out in the world taking meetings and making connections,” said Needham. “Our new IMDbPro iPhone app empowers members to access the entertainment industry’s most complete and authoritative information resource wherever they go, and was developed in collaboration with IMDbPro customers, who have told us that a mobile app is the #1 most impactful new product we could launch to support their daily professional needs.”

IMDbPro’s new iPhone App also enables push notifications so that subscribers can be kept up-to-date on a specific project or person that is particularly relevant to them.

DxO One Camera for Android is Now Available in an ‘Early Access’ Program ($499)

The primary reason why smartphone enthusiasts know about DxO Labs is because it’s the company behind DxOMark, the popular smartphone camera reviewing website. It isn’t the only service DxO Labs offers, though. The company now also has DxO One, a camera attachment for the iPhone, and has their own image editing software too.

033ff_DxO-One-Android DxO One Camera for Android is Now Available in an 'Early Access' Program ($499)

In October, DxO Labs announced that the DxO One would be coming soon for Android, two and a half years after its release for the iPhone in June 2015. It has a 20MP 1-inch sensor (similar to the Sony RX100 series) with a f/1.8 max aperture.

The DxO One is pocketable because it doesn’t have a primary display of its own. Instead, it has a small onboard OLED display and it relies on a smartphone’s display for the viewfinder in order to frame photos. The Android version connects to smartphones via the USB Type-C port. The primary reason it can take better photos than most smartphones is because it has a larger sensor with 1-inch sensor size, compared to smartphone sensors, which range in size from 1/2.3-inch to 1/3.1-inch. It supports RAW photography via Super RAW, and records up to 4x slow motion video.

Now, DxO Labs has announced that the One camera is now available in an ‘Early Access’ program for $499. The $499 price includes the camera, a waterproof case for submerging the camera attachment up to 45-meters, and DxO Photolab – the company’s image processing software. Normally, the case and DxO Photolab have price tags of $59.90 and $199 respectively.

Users can head to DxO’s website and enter their email and phone model to order the DxO One camera. Strangely, the DxO One will support only a limited list of smartphones for now, instead of supporting every Android smartphone with a USB-C port. The current list of supported phones includes the HTC U11, Huawei Mate 9, Huawei P10, LG G6, LG V20, Moto Z, Nexus 5X, Nokia 8, Nubia Z11 mini, Samsung Galaxy A5 2017, Samsung Note 8, Samsung Galaxy S8 and Huawei Honor 9. If users have any other smartphone, they can select “other” and then specify their brand of phone.

The Android version of the DxO One will have full image and video capture capabilities out-of-the-box, but it won’t have support for Facebook live streaming and time-lapse right away. DxO Labs says that it will add the aforementioned features and more in the coming months.


Source: DxO LabsVia: Android Central

Download: New official ‘Light in Darkness’ Windows 10 theme now available

by Surur

 

Linux Mint 18.3 ‘Sylvia’ KDE and Xfce betas available for download, but don’t bother

43cde_mint-sylviakde Linux Mint 18.3 'Sylvia' KDE and Xfce betas available for download, but don't bother

Linux Mint is a great operating system that I recommend highly. It is based on the rock-solid Ubuntu 16.04, meaning it is stable and compatible with many packages. For Windows converts in particular, Linux Mint with the Cinnamon desktop environment can be a very inviting first-time distribution that should offer a positive experience. The Mate DE variant is a solid choice too — if your hardware is a bit anemic, that is.

Two desktop environments are probably the most that a Linux operating system should officially offer. Why? Too much choice can sometimes be bad, as it fragments the user experience and strains developer resources. Thankfully, the Linux Mint team seems to be seeing the light on this, as it will soon be ending the KDE version of the OS. There is still one final version of Mint that will offer KDE, however, and that is 18.3 Sylvia. Today, the beta version featuring that environment sees release.

Since it has one foot in the grave, you should probably avoid Linux Mint 18.3 KDE. If you are dead set on using that overly complicated desktop environment, however, switching to an operating system that will support it would be a better move. I would recommend going with Netrunner or Kubuntu, but better yet, just use Mint with the great Cinnamon DE!

In addition to the KDE variant beta, the Linux Mint team has also released a beta version of 18.3 Sylvia Xfce. Now, I am not a fan of that desktop environment. To speak bluntly and a bit crudely, Xfce sucks compared to both Cinnamon and Mate. Quite frankly, there is no reason for Mint Xfce to exist either. It is a good option for low-powered hardware, but so is Mate. With that said, an Xfce version is simply redundant and a waste of resources. I am not saying Xfce needs to disappear — we just don’t need an official version of Mint for it.

43cde_mint-sylviakde Linux Mint 18.3 'Sylvia' KDE and Xfce betas available for download, but don't bother

ALSO READ: Forget Windows 10! Dell launches five new computers with Ubuntu Linux pre-installed

The KDE variant of Mint gets an upgrade to Plasma 5.8, but for the most part, it is otherwise unremarkable. I mean, it is about to be retired after all — what did you expect? The Linux Mint team shares several improvements that are specific to the Xfce version below, however.

  • Notifications are better looking and more customizable than before. Themes were improved and symbolic icons are now supported.
  • The computer can now be put into a “Do not disturb” mode to prevent notifications from appearing.
  • Notifications can also be ignored for specific applications and a log is available to see notifications that may have been missed.
  • The task manager is now able to identify windows by clicking on them.
  • The terminal was updated to version 0.8.0 and it received a lot of new features.

If you want to try Linux Mint, I urge you to try the Cinnamon or Mate versions which you can read about here — they are already out of beta and have bright futures. If you foolishly have an interest in the KDE or Xfce betas, however, you can download them and read the release notes using the links below.

Android Oreo is now available for the HTC U11 Life

Following an update which rolled out to its flagship HTC U11, the company is now rolling out Android Oreo to the recently released HTC U11 Life.


1ef14_giftguide_schoon_13 Android Oreo is now available for the HTC U11 Life

The best gifts for Android users

If you’ll recall, the HTC U11 Life recently debuted both domestically and internationally as a T-Mobile exclusive in the States, as well as the first Android One product from HTC overseas. The smaller, mid-range device clearly pulls a lot from the standard HTC U11, including the same blue color and squeezable sides.

Unfortunately, the T-Mobile version of the phone as well as the Android One option aren’t getting Oreo just yet, but HTC’s VP of Product Management Mo Versi has confirmed the update for unlocked models of the phone. Presumably, updates for the T-Mobile and Android One variants won’t be far behind, but we’re glad in any case to see HTC providing a quick update for a phone this new.


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