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Net neutrality: Could anything stop the repeal of the Open Internet regulations?

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Net neutrality – what does it really mean?
Time

Time is running out on the federal regulations that prevent Internet service providers such as ATT and Comcast from blocking or slowing online content.

Those 2015 rules, which also prohibit Internet providers from favoring some content for payment, are set to be replaced Thursday by a vote during the Federal Communications Commission’s monthly meeting.

With three Republican votes on the five-member commission, those so-called net neutrality rules are expected to be reversed with a new measure: the Restoring Internet Freedom order, which instead requires Net companies to disclose any blocking or prioritization of their own content or from their partners.

More: Congress should block FCC’s net neutrality vote, Internet experts say

More: After net neutrality: How to tell if your ISP is slowing your Internet

More: Millions of net neutrality comments were faked. Turns out mine was one.

Follow USA TODAY Tech on Facebook

Supporters of the earlier set of rules, passed two years ago by a Democrat-led FCC, continue to voice their concerns, hoping for a postponement or cancellation of Thursday’s vote.

An online protest this week included a constant wave of tweets from individuals asking the FCC and Congress to keep the current rules. Sites such as Funny or Die, Mozilla and Reddit supported a “Break the Internet” campaign on their home pages.

In addition to 39 senators — 37 Democrats and two Independents — who wrote to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai Tuesday asking that the “reckless” plan be abandoned, five Republican members have expressed concerns, too. And 118 House Democrats signed their own letter Wednesday asking for a delay, too.

In a separate letter Tuesday, Rep. Mike Coffman (R-Colo.) asked Pai to delay the vote and let Congress pass legislation.

And one member, Rep. Jerry McNerney (D-Calif.), asked to address the FCC before its vote and was turned down. However, should the new Net order be adopted, McNerney plans to co-sponsor legislation from Rep. Mike Doyle (D-Pa.) to overturn the measure. 

Speaking on Sirius XM Wednesday, Commissioner Mignon Clyburn said she had been seeking a postponement of the vote. “I am hopeful,” said Clyburn, one of two Democrats on the commission.

Clyburn also tweeted a humorous alternative proposal to the commission, which crossed out nearly all the wording of the proposal to simply affirm the 2015 rules. 

A survey released Tuesday suggests the public strongly approves of the current rules. More than three-fourths (83%) of the 1,077 surveyed by the Program for Public Consultation at the University of Maryland opposed repealing the current rules, according to the findings released by the nonpartisan group Voice of the People.

Regardless, the vote is set for Thursday morning at the FCC meeting, which begins at 10:30 a.m. ET.

Technically, Congress can take no action preventing the FCC from voting Thursday. Instead, it can only ask the agency to postpone or cancel the vote, and then try to pass a law governing Internet access.

Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., said Tuesday Congress needs to act. “There is obviously immense passion that follows the issue of net neutrality.  Americans care deeply about preserving a free and open Internet.  As do I and so many of my colleagues on both sides of the aisle,” said Thune on the Senate floor Tuesday. He also commended Pai on his work as chairman on the issue.

“Congressional action is the only way to solve the endless back and forth on net neutrality rules that we’ve seen over the past several years,” Thune said.

Clamor has accompanied this issue for several years. The 2015 rules, shepherded by Chairman Tom Wheeler, a Democrat, were passed a year after a federal court overturned the agency’s rules from 2010.

Supported by President Obama, the 2015 rules treated Internet service providers (ISPs) similarly to public utilities such as electric companies. But Pai, who opposed the measure at the time, has called  those regulations heavy-handed and too restrictive on ISPs.

The new proposal gives ISPs leeway to experiment and will spur innovation and investment, he says. “Instead of saddling the Internet with heavy-handed regulations, we will work together to take targeted action against bad actors,” Pai said Monday in a statement on how the FCC and Federal Trade Commission will protect consumers.

Interest in the issue fueled a record number of public comments to the FCC: about 23 million. However, millions were found to be fake, with some submitted by bots and others sent from Russian email addresses.

The 2015 rules faced, and survived, a court challenge and these new rules will likely face one, too, if they are passed Thursday as expected.

That will result in a shift in the balance of online power towards ISPs and away from content providers, something that could swing the other way in another three years should a new administration take over the White House.

“Legally we are always going to have this problem until Congress clarifies what the FCC’s authority should be over broadband providers, in particular,” said Dan Lyons, a professor at the Boston College Law School. “The more distrustful you are of broadband providers, the more likely you are to think we need more regulation in this area.”

Follow USA TODAY reporter Mike Snider on Twitter: @MikeSnider.

Anything iPhone X can do… Android phones will get ‘deep portrait …

The iPhone X has been out for a little more than a month, but there are already plans to replicate its headline features in 2018’s high-end Android phones.

‘Deep portrait’ selfie photography, and Face ID and Unlock, will be supported by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 chipset, which is likely to be in a majority of top Androids next year.

This will enable bokeh-rich portrait photos from the selfie camera, which we’ve mainly seen on rear-facing cameras among Android phones. Blurring the background in your subject-focused selfies is a much more compelling effect than selfie beauty mode and skin smoothing, which almost blurs… you.

And while Android handsets have had a primitive version of Face ID and Unlock, Qualcomm’s solution is being touted as a way to match Apple’s TrueDepth front-facing camera. It all needs to start at the system-on-a-chip level.

We don’t know which phones will support the Snapdragon 845 chipset, and in turn support deep portrait selfies and Face ID, but almost all major phone makers did have the Snapdragon 835 chipset at the core of their hardware. The Samsung Galaxy S9 may be the first with the new 10nm silicon. 

Ready for Android Animoji?

You can also expect to see more 3D face-mapping on Android phones to match what we’ve seen from Apple’s Animoji feature.

Qualcomm’s new chipset has active depth-sensing and supports IR sensors for face-mapping. The company also talked up the security of its chip, noting that face-mapping security is of the utmost importance.

The Huawei-made Honor View 10 is already attempting to clone Animoji, but having the architecture in place on the chip is vital to improving performance and adoption of the next-generation of front-facing camera features.

  • We’re reporting live from Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Summit in Hawaii, bringing you the latest news, features and hands on reviews on the future of smartphones, laptops, 5G and IoT. You can follow all our coverage here.

Anything iPhone X can do… Android phones will get ‘deep portrait …

The iPhone X has been out for a little more than a month, but there are already plans to replicate its headline features in 2018’s high-end Android phones.

‘Deep portrait’ selfie photography, and Face ID and Unlock, will be supported by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 chipset, which is likely to be in a majority of top Androids next year.

This will enable bokeh-rich portrait photos from the selfie camera, which we’ve mainly seen on rear-facing cameras among Android phones. Blurring the background in your subject-focused selfies is a much more compelling effect than selfie beauty mode and skin smoothing, which almost blurs… you.

And while Android handsets have had a primitive version of Face ID and Unlock, Qualcomm’s solution is being touted as a way to match Apple’s TrueDepth front-facing camera. It all needs to start at the system-on-a-chip level.

We don’t know which phones will support the Snapdragon 845 chipset, and in turn support deep portrait selfies and Face ID, but almost all major phone makers did have the Snapdragon 835 chipset at the core of their hardware. The Samsung Galaxy S9 may be the first with the new 10nm silicon. 

Ready for Android Animoji?

You can also expect to see more 3D face-mapping on Android phones to match what we’ve seen from Apple’s Animoji feature.

Qualcomm’s new chipset has active depth-sensing and supports IR sensors for face-mapping. The company also talked up the security of its chip, noting that face-mapping security is of the utmost importance.

The Huawei-made Honor View 10 is already attempting to clone Animoji, but having the architecture in place on the chip is vital to improving performance and adoption of the next-generation of front-facing camera features.

  • We’re reporting live from Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Summit in Hawaii, bringing you the latest news, features and hands on reviews on the future of smartphones, laptops, 5G and IoT. You can follow all our coverage here.

Anything iPhone X can do… Android phones will get ‘deep portrait …

The iPhone X has been out for a little more than a month, but there are already plans to replicate its headline features in 2018’s high-end Android phones.

‘Deep portrait’ selfie photography, and Face ID and Unlock, will be supported by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 chipset, which is likely to be in a majority of top Androids next year.

This will enable bokeh-rich portrait photos from the selfie camera, which we’ve mainly seen on rear-facing cameras among Android phones. Blurring the background in your subject-focused selfies is a much more compelling effect than selfie beauty mode and skin smoothing, which almost blurs… you.

And while Android handsets have had a primitive version of Face ID and Unlock, Qualcomm’s solution is being touted as a way to match Apple’s TrueDepth front-facing camera. It all needs to start at the system-on-a-chip level.

We don’t know which phones will support the Snapdragon 845 chipset, and in turn support deep portrait selfies and Face ID, but almost all major phone makers did have the Snapdragon 835 chipset at the core of their hardware. The Samsung Galaxy S9 may be the first with the new 10nm silicon. 

Ready for Android Animoji?

You can also expect to see more 3D face-mapping on Android phones to match what we’ve seen from Apple’s Animoji feature.

Qualcomm’s new chipset has active depth-sensing and supports IR sensors for face-mapping. The company also talked up the security of its chip, noting that face-mapping security is of the utmost importance.

The Huawei-made Honor View 10 is already attempting to clone Animoji, but having the architecture in place on the chip is vital to improving performance and adoption of the next-generation of front-facing camera features.

  • We’re reporting live from Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Summit in Hawaii, bringing you the latest news, features and hands on reviews on the future of smartphones, laptops, 5G and IoT. You can follow all our coverage here.

Anything iPhone X can do… Android phones will get ‘deep portrait …

The iPhone X has been out for a little more than a month, but there are already plans to replicate its headline features in 2018’s high-end Android phones.

‘Deep portrait’ selfie photography, and Face ID and Unlock, will be supported by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 chipset, which is likely to be in a majority of top Androids next year.

This will enable bokeh-rich portrait photos from the selfie camera, which we’ve mainly seen on rear-facing cameras among Android phones. Blurring the background in your subject-focused selfies is a much more compelling effect than selfie beauty mode and skin smoothing, which almost blurs… you.

And while Android handsets have had a primitive version of Face ID and Unlock, Qualcomm’s solution is being touted as a way to match Apple’s TrueDepth front-facing camera. It all needs to start at the system-on-a-chip level.

We don’t know which phones will support the Snapdragon 845 chipset, and in turn support deep portrait selfies and Face ID, but almost all major phone makers did have the Snapdragon 835 chipset at the core of their hardware. The Samsung Galaxy S9 may be the first with the new 10nm silicon. 

Ready for Android Animoji?

You can also expect to see more 3D face-mapping on Android phones to match what we’ve seen from Apple’s Animoji feature.

Qualcomm’s new chipset has active depth-sensing and supports IR sensors for face-mapping. The company also talked up the security of its chip, noting that face-mapping security is of the utmost importance.

The Huawei-made Honor View 10 is already attempting to clone Animoji, but having the architecture in place on the chip is vital to improving performance and adoption of the next-generation of front-facing camera features.

  • We’re reporting live from Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Summit in Hawaii, bringing you the latest news, features and hands on reviews on the future of smartphones, laptops, 5G and IoT. You can follow all our coverage here.

Anything iPhone X can do… Android phones will get ‘deep portrait …

The iPhone X has been out for a little more than a month, but there are already plans to replicate its headline features in 2018’s high-end Android phones.

‘Deep portrait’ selfie photography, and Face ID and Unlock, will be supported by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 chipset, which is likely to be in a majority of top Androids next year.

This will enable bokeh-rich portrait photos from the selfie camera, which we’ve mainly seen on rear-facing cameras among Android phones. Blurring the background in your subject-focused selfies is a much more compelling effect than selfie beauty mode and skin smoothing, which almost blurs… you.

And while Android handsets have had a primitive version of Face ID and Unlock, Qualcomm’s solution is being touted as a way to match Apple’s TrueDepth front-facing camera. It all needs to start at the system-on-a-chip level.

We don’t know which phones will support the Snapdragon 845 chipset, and in turn support deep portrait selfies and Face ID, but almost all major phone makers did have the Snapdragon 835 chipset at the core of their hardware. The Samsung Galaxy S9 may be the first with the new 10nm silicon. 

Ready for Android Animoji?

You can also expect to see more 3D face-mapping on Android phones to match what we’ve seen from Apple’s Animoji feature.

Qualcomm’s new chipset has active depth-sensing and supports IR sensors for face-mapping. The company also talked up the security of its chip, noting that face-mapping security is of the utmost importance.

The Huawei-made Honor View 10 is already attempting to clone Animoji, but having the architecture in place on the chip is vital to improving performance and adoption of the next-generation of front-facing camera features.

  • We’re reporting live from Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Summit in Hawaii, bringing you the latest news, features and hands on reviews on the future of smartphones, laptops, 5G and IoT. You can follow all our coverage here.

Anything iPhone X can do… Android phones will get ‘deep portrait’ mode and Face ID

The iPhone X has been out for a little more than a month, but there are already plans to replicate its headline features in 2018’s high-end Android phones.

‘Deep portrait’ selfie photography, and Face ID and Unlock, will be supported by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 chipset, which is likely to be in a majority of top Androids next year.

This will enable bokeh-rich portrait photos from the selfie camera, which we’ve mainly seen on rear-facing cameras among Android phones. Blurring the background in your subject-focused selfies is a much more compelling effect than selfie beauty mode and skin smoothing, which almost blurs… you.

And while Android handsets have had a primitive version of Face ID and Unlock, Qualcomm’s solution is being touted as a way to match Apple’s TrueDepth front-facing camera. It all needs to start at the system-on-a-chip level.

We don’t know which phones will support the Snapdragon 845 chipset, and in turn support deep portrait selfies and Face ID, but almost all major phone makers did have the Snapdragon 835 chipset at the core of their hardware. The Samsung Galaxy S9 may be the first with the new 10nm silicon. 

Ready for Android Animoji?

You can also expect to see more 3D face-mapping on Android phones to match what we’ve seen from Apple’s Animoji feature.

Qualcomm’s new chipset has active depth-sensing and supports IR sensors for face-mapping. The company also talked up the security of its chip, noting that face-mapping security is of the utmost importance.

The Huawei-made Honor View 10 is already attempting to clone Animoji, but having the architecture in place on the chip is vital to improving performance and adoption of the next-generation of front-facing camera features.

  • We’re reporting live from Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Summit in Hawaii, bringing you the latest news, features and hands on reviews on the future of smartphones, laptops, 5G and IoT. You can follow all our coverage here.

Measure anything with augmented reality and your iPhone

This article is brought to you by Mac Life magazine. If you’d like to read more articles like this then subscribe to Mac Life magazine,  and save an extra 10% off a subscription – it’s also the perfect gift for any Apple fan. Simply add code ML10 at checkout.

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We’ve seen all sorts of Pokémon Go-style “cartoon characters in the coffee shop” demos, some of which are emerging as finished products, but AR has more practical uses, with a growing number of measuring tape apps rapidly filling the App Store.

Because they’re built on the same ARKit features, these apps all work in similar ways, and AR MeasureKit exemplifies both the cleverness and the frustration of the technology. Open it and a live view from your camera fills the screen, which ARKit spends a few seconds analyzing. 

You need to wave your iPhone or iPad gently around, which is what you’d do naturally. It may then ask you to point at a surface, and by this it means a horizontal flat surface – for now, that’s the only thing ARKit really understands.

AR MeasureKit’s only free tool is the Ruler. In theory, you point your iPhone or iPad at whatever you want to measure, tap a start point and an end point, and the app draws a line between them in 3D space, instantly calculating its length. Sadly, the first catch is that you can’t just tap anywhere on the screen; you have to get the point you want in the center. Then you need to move to the end point. However, given the system’s limited accuracy, your start point begins to drift.

We tried out the app on an iPhone SE and an iPad Pro. If you thought wearing a VR helmet looked awkward, just wait until you try to measure a sofa with an iPad. The slightest movement jolts your center point off target, and it’s no good using two hands to steady the screen, because you’ll need one free to tap it. The iPhone was easier to wield, and the SE’s older hardware coped fine.

Under ideal conditions our measurements were about right – but they can be wildly wrong. If you were trying to measure something, how would you know? The way the lines drifted out of perspective as we moved made us wonder if ARKit truly understood where they lay in 3D space. This was also the Angle tool’s downfall, which couldn’t even reliably handle the 90-degree corners of a table.

We liked the tool that measures someone’s height. The developer suggests using this to record a child’s growth. But everyone knows roughly how tall they are; you measure to find out exactly. That’s what ARKit seems unable to do.

The bottom line: AR is going to be huge, but apps like this show it’s more impressive than practical. 

EdgeTile Creators for Windows lets you create Start pins for (almost) anything

ccf03_EdgeTile-Creators-Hero_0 EdgeTile Creators for Windows lets you create Start pins for (almost) anything

Tiles are a favorite part of Windows 10 for many users. EdgeTile Creators lets you spice up your Start Menu and jump to the things you want quicker.

Customizing the layout of Live tiles is an enjoyed pastime of many Windows users. Finding the perfect layout for your apps and shortcuts within the Start Menu can be satisfying. EdgeTile Creators lets you create custom tiles for files, folders, and executables, and it doesn’t have some of the common drawbacks of similar apps.

The app is available for Windows 10 for $3.99.

See in Microsoft Store

Customizable Tiles

ccf03_EdgeTile-Creators-Hero_0 EdgeTile Creators for Windows lets you create Start pins for (almost) anything

EdgeTile Creators has an easy to use interface. You just click the plus icon to start the process of creating a tile and then select what you want it to look like and what you want it to open. You’re able to create custom tiles for any file, folder, or URL. You can also launch .exe files. Because Windows 10 has the option to have specific websites open apps, you can use EdgeTile Creators to create custom tiles for certain apps. For example, creating a custom tile for our website can launch the Windows Central app.

When you create a tile, you can select different images for the four tile sizes, or you can use the same image across all of them, though this will stretch the image on the wide tile rather than crop it. You can also select the tile color, text, and text color. When you use the right photos and options, the tiles you create fit right in with the rest of your Start screen or menu.

Tiles feel native

ccf03_EdgeTile-Creators-Hero_0 EdgeTile Creators for Windows lets you create Start pins for (almost) anything

There are other apps that allow you to create custom tiles, but they often have a splash screen appear whenever you click a tile. These usually go away very quickly but they still make it take longer to get to websites or files. Additionally, the splash screens are a reminder that you are using a third-party app to create tiles. EdgeTile Creators overcomes this common pitfall by creating tiles that quickly jump to where you want them to without any loading screen.

In our testing, the loading times to open a website or file seem the same as if you went to them directly. This allows you to set up the app and leave it running, which is the ideal situation for an app like this.

While the speed of tiles launching feels native, unfortunately the tiles you create are not Live tiles, meaning they don’t show new info in real-time. Whether this is a major factor to you depends on how you use the Start menu. Some people like tiles because they look unique and are resizable but don’t care about Live tiles. For others, they’re a must-have.

Final thoughts on EdgeTile Creators

ccf03_EdgeTile-Creators-Hero_0 EdgeTile Creators for Windows lets you create Start pins for (almost) anything

EdgeTile Creators is a great app to try out if you want to customize your Start screen or menu. The custom tiles it creates work very quickly and allow you to jump to files, folder, and more without a splash screen or added loading time.

There are features that would be great to see, such as Live tiles for websites and programs, but to some users that isn’t a major factor. Overall, it’s a solid app that creates a more personalized Windows 10 experience. And it’s worth $4.

Great

4/5
ccf03_EdgeTile-Creators-Hero_0 EdgeTile Creators for Windows lets you create Start pins for (almost) anythingccf03_EdgeTile-Creators-Hero_0 EdgeTile Creators for Windows lets you create Start pins for (almost) anythingccf03_EdgeTile-Creators-Hero_0 EdgeTile Creators for Windows lets you create Start pins for (almost) anythingccf03_EdgeTile-Creators-Hero_0 EdgeTile Creators for Windows lets you create Start pins for (almost) anythingccf03_EdgeTile-Creators-Hero_0 EdgeTile Creators for Windows lets you create Start pins for (almost) anything

See in Microsoft Store

Apple COO Jeff Williams on tech and health care: ‘we can’t think of anything more significant’

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972b8_103250523-GettyImages-465687438.530x298 Apple COO Jeff Williams on tech and health care: 'we can't think of anything more significant'

Apple’s chief operating officer Jeff Williams believes that advances in hardware and AI will revolutionize the way health care is delivered.

Williams delivered the remarks on Monday at an event hosted by Taiwanese chip maker TSMC about the company’s next decade.

“Probably one of the most significant examples of this is the opportunity to use transistor tech advances and power scaling to revolutionize health care. We think the (health) industry is ripe for change,” he told the audience.

“We think there is tremendous potential to do on-device computing, to do cloud computing as well, and to take that learning through machine learning, deep learning and ultimately artificial intelligence, change the way health is delivered,” he said.

“We can’t think of anything more significant than this.”

Apple has made some early forays into health care with its software toolkits for developers, ResearchKit, HealthKit and CareKit, as well as through its health and fitness-tracking Apple Watch.

At its most recent developers conference, WWDC, the company also shared stories of how Apple Watch’s heart rate sensor picked up on the early signs of disease, prompting users to seek help before it was too late. Now, the company is investing big in research to find out if it can use the device’s existing sensors to detect serious medical conditions.

The iPhone maker is also working on several research and development initiatives, including novel blood sugar sensors that might someday benefit millions of people worldwide with diabetes. The company is also exploring a move into primary care to improve the processes of care delivery.

This is one of the few occasions that Williams has spoken out about health care. Apple CEO Tim Cook has also talked about Apple’s interest in the space, even taking steps to learn about the experiences of patients bysporting a glucose monitor.

Watch the full speech here.

972b8_103250523-GettyImages-465687438.530x298 Apple COO Jeff Williams on tech and health care: 'we can't think of anything more significant'



Google Assistant shortcuts can make your Home say anything

Back in May, Google Assistant added support for shortcuts, allowing you to say one thing and have Assistant perform another command. For example, I set “night” as a shortcut for starting ambient noise on my Google Home. But you can just as easily have fun with it, when combined with Assistant’s ‘repeat after me’ command.

Here’s how it works: when you make a shortcut, type ‘repeat after me’ in the command box, followed by whatever you want Assistant to say. As a test, I set ‘Open the pod bay doors’ as the shortcut, and ‘repeat after me I’m sorry Dave, but I’m afraid I can’t do that’ as the command. You can see it in action below:

As you can probably guess, I’m not very creative, but I’m sure y’all can come up with some great uses for this beyond movie quotes. To make a new shortcut, just open the Google Assistant settings and tap on Shortcuts. You can find the Assistant settings through the side menu on the Google Home app, or by tapping the blue button on the Assistant popup and pressing the overflow menu.

Huawei’s take on Android Oreo doesn’t really change anything from Nougat

One of the phones I’m eagerly looking forward to this year is the Huawei Mate 10, and it’s supposedly going to be debuting with Android Oreo. Software was Huawei’s biggest weak point in the past, but it made great strides forward with EMUI 5. Now, we’re about to see EMUI 6, and our first look reveals that it hasn’t really changed all that much…


b1b23_giftguide_schoon_13 Huawei's take on Android Oreo doesn't really change anything from Nougat

The best gifts for Android users

XDA Developers obtained an early build of EMUI 6 for the Huawei Mate 9 which is based on Android Oreo, and reveals what the company has done with Google’s latest OS. Depending on what you thought of EMUI 5, you’ll either love or hate what’s being shown off, because it basically hasn’t changed.

Visually, EMUI 6 looks no different from EMUI 5, at all. There are some new features tossed in such as the ability to change screen resolution, hide your navigation bar on the fly, and even customize the fingerprint gestures to do whatever you’d like. Personally, that’s a feature I’m looking forward to trying out since the default setup still feels unintuitive to me.

b1b23_giftguide_schoon_13 Huawei's take on Android Oreo doesn't really change anything from Nougat b1b23_giftguide_schoon_13 Huawei's take on Android Oreo doesn't really change anything from Nougat

b1b23_giftguide_schoon_13 Huawei's take on Android Oreo doesn't really change anything from Nougat

b1b23_giftguide_schoon_13 Huawei's take on Android Oreo doesn't really change anything from Nougat

b1b23_giftguide_schoon_13 Huawei's take on Android Oreo doesn't really change anything from Nougat

b1b23_giftguide_schoon_13 Huawei's take on Android Oreo doesn't really change anything from Nougat

That said, everything else new in this update is basically just on Oreo’s end. There’s the integration of Google’s new Autofill API, notification channels, picture-in-picture mode (which should be great on the Mate’s big screen), and strict background limitations for apps. XDA even reports that theming works through Substratum.

Huawei will debut the Mate 10 at an event on October 16th likely launching with this new UI and Android Oreo. As for the Mate 9 and other recent releases from the company, they’ll likely start picking up Oreo in the coming months.


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