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Hornets coach Steve Clifford to take leave of absence to address health

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Hornets coach Steve Clifford will be away from the team for an undetermined period of time to deal with a “health issue.”

The team made the announcement Wednesday in a release.

The 56-year-old Clifford missed Monday night’s game against Orlando because he was not feeling well. Associate head coach Stephen Silas filled in for Clifford against the Magic.

Clifford has battled heart problems in the past, but a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press the issue was not heart-related. The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because the team has not released details of Clifford’s health issue.

The team said there is no timetable for Clifford’s return and that officials would have no further comment.

Silas will continue to coach the team with Clifford out. The Hornets fell to Golden State 101-87 on Wednesday night.

“I just want to send him my best wishes,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “Obviously I have been through some issues, and I don’t know what his health issues are, but it’s no fun. I’m wishing him well and I hope he gets back on the sideline soon. But more importantly I hope that he’s healthy.”

If the players know what is wrong with Clifford, they aren’t saying.

“I feel like Cliff is one of those guys, no matter what is going on his life, he’s always going to be here,” Hornets forward Marvin Williams said. “So for him to not be here now is a little bit concerning. I have texted back and forth with him a couple of times and he’s texted back every time. He seems in good spirits. Whatever is going on with him, I’m sure he’s fine. If he has to step away to make sure he’s OK, that’s what is most important.”

Williams said the team has confidence in Silas.

“We will continue to follow his lead,” Williams said.

Clifford underwent a procedure in 2013 — his first year as Charlotte’s head coach — to have two stents placed in his heart, but he returned to coaching just three days later. The procedure came after Clifford began experiencing chest pain while eating at a Charlotte restaurant and had to be taken by ambulance to the hospital.

Clifford has since changed his diet and has been eating healthier.

The Hornets were playing well at home under Clifford, but they are just 9-13 overall heading into Wednesday night’s game. They have struggled on the road, where they are 1-10 this season despite the play of All-Star Kemba Walker. The point guard is turning in another impressive season, averaging 22.7 points and 6.3 assists per game.

Hornets coach Steve Clifford away for ‘immediate future’ to address health issues

A few hours before the Charlotte Hornets took on the Orlando Magic Monday night, it was announced that Steve Clifford would not be coaching due to an illness. 

Unfortunately, it turns out that whatever Charlotte’s coach is dealing with is not a short-term problem. The Hornets announced on Wednesday morning that Clifford will be stepping away from the team for the “immediate future” to deal with a health issue. They did not give a timetable for his return. Via NBA.com/Hornets:

The Charlotte Hornets announced today that Head Coach Steve Clifford will be away from the team for the immediate future to address his health. Currently, there is no timetable for his return. Hornets Associate Head Coach Stephen Silas will serve as acting head coach. Out of respect for Clifford’s privacy, the Hornets will have no further comment at this time.

Stephen Silas, who served as head coach against Orlando, will remain in charge during Clifford’s absence. Silas has been in the league as a scout or assistant coach since 1999, and has served as an assistant with the Hornets since 2010. 

Hopefully whatever Clifford is dealing with isn’t a serious issue and he’s able to rejoin the Hornets soon. 

How to Know Your IP Address if You’re Using Windows 10

770b4_ip-2-4 How to Know Your IP Address if You're Using Windows 10

Windows 10 came with amazing features and some of them are yet to be explored. According to the manufactures, this Operating System was built using feedback from millions of users -with its most pronounced forte being robust protection against phishing, malware, and viruses. Nonetheless, smart brains have discovered that you can actually see your IP address on any machine running Windows 10.

Literary speaking, you can assume your computer’s IP address to be a virtual residential address. You can always change your home address after you relocate; that’s given, right – the same case applies to the IP address when you move to another town it changes. Nevertheless, it’s also possible to change IP address on Windows 10 to suit your needs. 

770b4_ip-2-4 How to Know Your IP Address if You're Using Windows 10
Source: GoHacking

In real terms, your IP address serves two basic purposes: location addressing and network interface identification.

Why is it important?

In most cases, you’ll need to know your IP address when faced with Internet connectivity problems (the number can be used manually to resolve connection issues) or, when you are setting up a home theater Plex app or any service that may need to identify your computer. 

Steps to finding IP address on Windows 10

Well, there are two ways you can follow to uncover your IP address on Windows. One, you can use the Settings app button or the Command Prompt. The steps in both techniques are quite simple so you’ll not strain to follow through.

Method 1: Firing up the setting app

This is the easiest option to see your locations address on Windows 10 –already your computer is powered, so:

  1. Press Start, then go to Settings.
  2. You should be able to see the Network and Internet options here –click the button to follow through.
  3. A new platform opens. Look up in the left-hand panel, where a text will ask you to select either Ethernet or Wi-Fi, depending on the kind of connection you use, so try to be precise so you’ll be able to complete the process fast time right.
  4. At this point, you’ll should see your network or connection name, click on it.
  5. On the page that opens, engage the scroll bar and move down to where you’ll see IPv4 address –viola!
  6. The number -mostly separated by dots, is your IP address.

Method 2: Using Command Prompt

Most people don’t like anything to do the command prompt thinking that it’s something complex, well, it’s not. The black screen (sometimes white or blue depending on the PC) shouldn’t intimidate you on this because indeed you’ll be able to view your IP with a few steps. The result is the same no matter the approach you take:

  1. Open the Start Menu.
  2. A small “Search programs and files” field will appear.
  3. Type cmd and select Command Prompt, up there.
  4. Where the cursor blinks, type ipconfig and strike the Enter key (on your keyboard.)
  5. Scan (with your eyes) to locate either IPv4 Address (for Wi-Fi connectivity) or Autoconfiguration IPv4 Address (for Ethernet)
  6. The number you see after the white dots is your IP address.

As stated earlier, your address may not be constant as it changes with geographical location.

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How to Know Your IP Address if You’re Using Windows 10

770b4_ip-2-4 How to Know Your IP Address if You're Using Windows 10

Windows 10 came with amazing features and some of them are yet to be explored. According to the manufactures, this Operating System was built using feedback from millions of users -with its most pronounced forte being robust protection against phishing, malware, and viruses. Nonetheless, smart brains have discovered that you can actually see your IP address on any machine running Windows 10.

Literary speaking, you can assume your computer’s IP address to be a virtual residential address. You can always change your home address after you relocate; that’s given, right – the same case applies to the IP address when you move to another town it changes. Nevertheless, it’s also possible to change IP address on Windows 10 to suit your needs. 

770b4_ip-2-4 How to Know Your IP Address if You're Using Windows 10
Source: GoHacking

In real terms, your IP address serves two basic purposes: location addressing and network interface identification.

Why is it important?

In most cases, you’ll need to know your IP address when faced with Internet connectivity problems (the number can be used manually to resolve connection issues) or, when you are setting up a home theater Plex app or any service that may need to identify your computer. 

Steps to finding IP address on Windows 10

Well, there are two ways you can follow to uncover your IP address on Windows. One, you can use the Settings app button or the Command Prompt. The steps in both techniques are quite simple so you’ll not strain to follow through.

Method 1: Firing up the setting app

This is the easiest option to see your locations address on Windows 10 –already your computer is powered, so:

  1. Press Start, then go to Settings.
  2. You should be able to see the Network and Internet options here –click the button to follow through.
  3. A new platform opens. Look up in the left-hand panel, where a text will ask you to select either Ethernet or Wi-Fi, depending on the kind of connection you use, so try to be precise so you’ll be able to complete the process fast time right.
  4. At this point, you’ll should see your network or connection name, click on it.
  5. On the page that opens, engage the scroll bar and move down to where you’ll see IPv4 address –viola!
  6. The number -mostly separated by dots, is your IP address.

Method 2: Using Command Prompt

Most people don’t like anything to do the command prompt thinking that it’s something complex, well, it’s not. The black screen (sometimes white or blue depending on the PC) shouldn’t intimidate you on this because indeed you’ll be able to view your IP with a few steps. The result is the same no matter the approach you take:

  1. Open the Start Menu.
  2. A small “Search programs and files” field will appear.
  3. Type cmd and select Command Prompt, up there.
  4. Where the cursor blinks, type ipconfig and strike the Enter key (on your keyboard.)
  5. Scan (with your eyes) to locate either IPv4 Address (for Wi-Fi connectivity) or Autoconfiguration IPv4 Address (for Ethernet)
  6. The number you see after the white dots is your IP address.

As stated earlier, your address may not be constant as it changes with geographical location.

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Bills proposed to address underfunded pension, health plans

  • Underfunded systems could be forced to make changes
  • Republican-backed bills designed to address underfunded pension, health care liabilities
  • Bills could face stiff resistance

 Bills proposed to address underfunded pension, health plans

 Bills proposed to address underfunded pension, health plans

LANSING — Legislation proposed Thursday would require municipal pension and retiree health plans to annually report their finances to the state, and severely underfunded systems could ultimately be forced to make changes by state appointees.

The bills, introduced in both the Republican-controlled House and Senate and backed by Gov. Rick Snyder, are designed to ensure that local governments adequately address billions in unfunded pension and health care liabilities, according to GOP legislators. Democrats and police and firefighter unions, which had been concerned about potential benefit cuts, were studying the package and had no immediate reaction.

The legislation does not go as far as more sweeping bills — which died a year ago — that would have prohibited new municipal workers from qualifying for health insurance in retirement, made retiree health benefits a prohibited subject of collective bargaining and forced current retirees to pay more for health care. But the bills could still face resistance given their interplay with Michigan’s law that allows state emergency managers to run financially distressed cities.

Under a five-stage process, communities with significantly underfunded retirement plans would have to submit planned “corrective actions” to a new Local Government Retirement Stability Board comprised of three gubernatorial appointees. If the board rejected the plan or a local government could not agree on a proposal, the state treasurer would declare a financial emergency and appoint a three-person team to act as an emergency manager — with “broad powers” to rectify the underfunded status. The team, however, could choose not to impose measures if it decided they would “directly endanger the health, safety, or welfare” of residents.

Initially, a retiree health plan would be deemed inadequately funded if it is not at least 30 percent funded and costs the municipalities more than 10 percent of general fund spending. A pension plan would have to be at least 60 percent funded. The minimum thresholds would rise over time. The treasurer would issue a waiver from an underfunding status if the debt is being adequately addressed. Otherwise, the state board would become involved.

“If we don’t fix this problem now, communities with dangerously underfunded retirement systems could go bankrupt and fail to keep promises made to retirees,” said Republican Rep. Jim Lower of Cedar Lake. “This plan heads off that problem and gives local governments a warning system to prioritize and safeguard the benefits retirees and current employees expect.”

The introduction of the legislation came a day after hundreds of law enforcement officers and firefighters protested at the Capitol in support of their retirement benefits.

Senate Majority Leader Arlan Meekhof, a West Olive Republican, said the bills would give local governments and their unionized employees an incentive to live up to their retirement obligations.

“Why would a local community want somebody to have to come in and tell them what else they need to do to solve their retirement problem? They don’t want that,” Meekhof said.

Four easy ways to find your PC IP address on Windows 10 S

80f27_view-ip-address-windows-10-s Four easy ways to find your PC IP address on Windows 10 S

If you’re running Windows 10 S, you can use one of these four methods to figure out your device IP address.

There could be plenty scenarios where you may need to know your device IP address, including when you need to let other users access resources (e.g., files or printer), when setting up an internet connection, or to troubleshoot network problems.

Whatever the reason it might be, typically, most Windows 10 users would just launch Command Prompt and run the IPConfig tool to find out the current TCP/IP configuration. However, if you have a Surface Laptop or another device running Windows 10 S, you won’t have access to Command Prompt, PowerShell, or any other command-line app.

Thankfully, if you’re running Windows 10 S, there are still ways to find the IP address assigned to your device using the Settings app, Task Manager, Control Panel, and even System Information.

In this Windows 10 guide, we’ll show you four quick ways to find your device TCP/IP configuration without having to use command-line tools.

  • How to find IP address using Task Manager
  • How to find IP address using Settings
  • How to find IP address using System Information
  • How to find IP address using Control Panel

How to find IP address using Task Manager

The quickest way to find the current IP address of your device is using Task Manager.

  1. Right-click the Taskbar and select Task Manager.
  2. Click the More details button if you’re using the experience in compact mode.
  3. Click the Performance tab.
  4. Select the network adapter.

In the network adapter section, you’ll find your current IPv4 and IPv6 configuration of the device.

80f27_view-ip-address-windows-10-s Four easy ways to find your PC IP address on Windows 10 S

2. How to find IP address using Settings

On Windows 10 S, the Settings app is another place you can use to look for the networking configuration of your device.

Wi-Fi

  1. Open Settings.
  2. Click on Network Internet.
  3. Select Wi-Fi.
  4. Click the wireless network you’re connected.

    80f27_view-ip-address-windows-10-s Four easy ways to find your PC IP address on Windows 10 S

Under “Properties,” you’ll find your current network address in the IPv4 address field. Additionally, in this section, you’ll find other networking information, such as the DNS address, wireless signal protocol and SSID (Service Set Identifier), MAC address and more. However, for some odd reason, you won’t find your current IPv6 information.

80f27_view-ip-address-windows-10-s Four easy ways to find your PC IP address on Windows 10 S

Ethernet

  1. Open Settings.
  2. Click on Network Internet.
  3. Select Ethernet.
  4. Click the Ethernet connection.

    80f27_view-ip-address-windows-10-s Four easy ways to find your PC IP address on Windows 10 S

Under “Properties,” your IP address will be displayed in the IPv4 address field.

80f27_view-ip-address-windows-10-s Four easy ways to find your PC IP address on Windows 10 S

3. How to find IP address using System Information

On Windows 10 S, you can even use the System Information tool to figure out the IP address and other networking information about your device.

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for System Information and click the result to open the tool.
  3. Expand the Network group.
  4. Select Adapter.

On the right side, look for the name of your adapter, and you’ll find your current address next to the IP Address field, but note that if your adapter has IPv4 and IPv6 configurations, they both will appear in the IP Address field.

80f27_view-ip-address-windows-10-s Four easy ways to find your PC IP address on Windows 10 S

4. How to find IP address using Control Panel

Alternatively, you can use the networking options within Control Panel to see the IP address currently assigned to your device along with several other networking configurations.

  1. Open Control Panel.
  2. Click on Network and Internet.
  3. Click on Network and Sharing Center.

    80f27_view-ip-address-windows-10-s Four easy ways to find your PC IP address on Windows 10 S

  4. On the left pane, click the Change adapter settings option.

    80f27_view-ip-address-windows-10-s Four easy ways to find your PC IP address on Windows 10 S

  5. Double-click the network adapter you want (e.g., Wi-Fi or Ethernet0).

    80f27_view-ip-address-windows-10-s Four easy ways to find your PC IP address on Windows 10 S

  6. In the “General” tab, click the Details button.

    80f27_view-ip-address-windows-10-s Four easy ways to find your PC IP address on Windows 10 S

In “Network Connection Details,” the IP address for your device will be shown in the IPv4 Address field. If you’re looking for the IPv6 address of your device, then this information will be shown in the Link-local IPv6 Address field.

80f27_view-ip-address-windows-10-s Four easy ways to find your PC IP address on Windows 10 S

Also, note that in this section you can find a lot of additional information, such as physical address (MAC), DNS address, whether your device is using DHCP server to obtain its TCP/IP configuration and the TCP/IP lease expiration date.

More Windows 10 resources

For more helpful articles, coverage, and answers to common questions about Windows 10, visit the following resources:

Enterprises must address Internet of Identities challenges

As November ends, everyone and their brother/sister will be writing about their IT and security predictions for 2018. Here’s a no-brainer from me — we’ll see massive proliferation of Internet of Things (IoT) devices on the network next year. Some of these will be general-purpose devices, such as IP cameras, smart thermostats, smart electric meters, etc., but many others will be industry-specific sensors, actuators, and data collectors. 

Managing the deployment, operations, and security of all these devices will be quite challenging. Someone must figure out network access controls, connectivity, segmentation, baseline behavior, network performance implications, etc.

This is where identity comes into play. Each device should have its own identity and attributes that govern connectivity, policy, and trust. My sagacious colleague, Mark Bowker, calls this trend the Internet of Identities. With Mark’s help, I introduced the concept of the Internet of Identities in this blog post, and further elaborated on the massive changes the Internet of Identities will bring in this one

The Internet of Identities is coming fast, but ESG research indicates that many organizations are not prepared for the onslaught because:

Letter: We need to address both mental health and gun problem

According to The New York Times, the U.S. death rate from gun homicides is about 31 per million, compared to a rate in England of about 1 per million and 1 per 10 million in Japan.

Letter: We need to address both mental health and gun problem

According to The New York Times, the U.S. death rate from gun homicides is about 31 per million, compared to a rate in England of about 1 per million and 1 per 10 million in Japan.

Chime in: Should Microsoft build an Android emulator to address the Windows app gap?

1e76f_google-pixel-2-xl-white-hands-on-6 Chime in: Should Microsoft build an Android emulator to address the Windows app gap?

If there’s one common complaint among the majority of Windows users, particularly Window Mobile users, it’s the “app gap,” or Windows’s lack of mobile, “touch-friendly” applications compared to other platforms, such as Android, iOS, and macOS.

The problem is a complex one, and it’s sort of a “Catch 22;” developers won’t invest time and effort in creating great apps if the users aren’t there to download (and perhaps pay) for them, but people won’t embrace a platform if the apps aren’t there. Alas, the app gap.

During the past few years, countless people have proposed seemingly endless solutions to this significant hurdle Windows faces. More recently, Windows Central forum member Younes Mirzaie created a thread asking whether the solution may be a native Android emulator for Windows and Surface, that would let people run Android apps on their PCs or other Windows devices.

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1e76f_google-pixel-2-xl-white-hands-on-6 Chime in: Should Microsoft build an Android emulator to address the Windows app gap?

If there’s one company that can create flawless emulators, it’s Microsoft. They’ve proven them selves with Xbox 360 on One and Windows 10 on ARM. So why not creating a built-in emulator for android or ask Bluestacks developers to build one for Surface? If this device is a Windows PC then it can easily handle the current Bluestacks app for Windows with no problem. However a built-in version is…

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It sounds great, in theory, right? But anyone who has used emulators like this knows they typically sound better than they work. That’s because there’s a lot going on behind the scenes of apps and device, and it’s often difficult or impossible for an emulator to recreate it all. And even if you do, it puts a major strain on system resources. Bluestacks for Windows 10 is one such solution, and it works pretty well, but it requires powerful PC-grade hardware and full Windows to run properly.

Still, a Microsoft-built Android emulator might be better than nothing, right? And even if it doesn’t completely fill in the app gap, it could at least address it in some way.

What do you think? Should Microsoft build an Android emulator? Or should people who want Android just get an Android device? Hit the forum link below and chime in with your two cents.

From the forums: Why fight if you can use your rival for your own benefit?

Cardinal Health announced program to address opioid crisis

As Cardinal Health continues to face lawsuits over its alleged role in stoking the national opioid crisis, the company on Thursday is scheduled to announce a sweeping program in Appalachia aimed at combating drug abuse.

Its Opioid Action Program, in cooperation with local partners in Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee and West Virginia, is being called a pilot program that could be expanded over time.

The Dublin-based company, one of the nation’s three dominant distributors of drugs made by other companies, is targeting an initial $10 million investment in the program through June 2018, the end of Cardinal’s fiscal year. The key steps Cardinal will take include:

• Buy and distribute, free of charge, approximately 80,000 doses of Narcan, also known by its generic name naloxone HC, to first responders and law enforcement officials in the target areas.

• Increase its existing support for drug-disposal and education programs, building on the Cardinal Health Foundation’s Generation Rx program in partnership with the Ohio State University College of Pharmacy.

• Devote $3 million to expand existing grants targeting youth drug-abuse prevention education, opioid awareness for prescribing physicians and related opiod-reduction efforts.

• Join with Brown University’s Warren Alpert Medical School to share teaching materials on opioid misuse and treatment with medical schools in Appalachia and elsewhere.

The efforts will be based in the targeted states, where Cardinal has operations. Those could include central Ohio communities including Obetz, Groveport and Zanesville, according to a spokeswoman.

“Opioid addiction and abuse has harmed too many people in our home state of Ohio, across Appalachia and around the country,” said George Barrett, chairman and CEO of Cardinal, in a statement. “This program is intended to build on the important work we have done over the years to bring more resources to communities that need them, with a focus on known solutions that will help families and communities combat this epidemic.”

Cardinal announced the broad parameters of the plan in August but has not previously released any details. Since then, the company has continued to draw fire from critics.

In the wake of multi-million dollar settlements from Cardinal and its two competitors, AmerisourceBergen and McKesson in opioid-related cases, cities and municipalities have continued to sue the distributors.

Also, last week, an investor group led by the Teamsters protested at Cardinal’s annual shareholders meeting over opioid deaths and the company’s alleged role in the crisis. And two days before that, the company announced Barrett would relinquish the CEO title at the end of the year and step down as executive chairman in November 2018. The Teamster-led group wanted the company to separate the roles of CEO and chairman.

Cardinal and its competitors also are under heightened scrutiny following an October report from 60 Minutes and the Washington Post, in which a former Drug Enforcement Administration official charged them with helping pass legislation that tied the DEA’s hands in stopping opioid diversion.

Through a trade group, the drug-distribution companies have countered that the 2016 Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act did not hamper DEA enforcement actions.

One official that has been involved with Cardinal’s anti-drug-abuse efforts in the past understands that the latest announcement may be viewed with skepticism, given the climate.

But Dr. Ken Hale, a clinical professor in OSU’s pharmacy college and co-director of its Generation Rx program with Cardinal, says he believes Cardinal and its employees have been committed for years with little fanfare to helping prevent and stem opioid abuse. As part of Generation Rx, Cardinal has given money to help pay for workers and materials devoted to the program at OSU since 2009.

“I’ve been very impressed with what they’re trying to do,” Hale said. “They’ve invested a considerable amount of funds and employees’ time to prevention efforts with us. They’ve reached millions of people, from grade school age to senior citizens.”

Hale echoed Barrett and the Healthcare Distribution Alliance industry trade group in stressing that the drug epidemic has many causes and many players who must be part of the solution.

“I’m not saying the distributors don’t have any culpability in this,” he said. “But pharmacists, health professionals, patients … all have responsibility. To point the finger at drug distributors is misguided.”

The program certainly won’t be a cure-all for the opioid problem, which has had an outsized impact on Appalachia. In Ohio alone last year, EMS workers reportedly administered in excess of 19,500 doses of nalaxone, the anti-overdose medication Cardinal will be distributing.

More information on the program will be posted online at www.cardinalhealth.com/opioidactionprogram.

mrose@dispatch.com

@MarlaMRose

Facebook offered free ads to mental health start-up, but could do more to address mental health, says Talkspace CEO

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ae00e_104835913-Oren_frank.530x298 Facebook offered free ads to mental health start-up, but could do more to address mental health, says Talkspace CEO

When disasters from hurricanes to wildfires swept the U.S. this fall, mental health start-up Talkspace turned to Facebook for free advertising to reach victims.

But while Talkspace CEO Oren Frank says he’s grateful for the donation, he was left with mixed feelings about accepting the ads.

Facebook is a near-necessity for companies trying to rapidly reach disaster victims, including Talkspace, which offers online therapy, Frank said. But Frank believes Facebook could take a more active approach when it comes to stewarding the mental health of its users.

“Facebook are currently insisting that they are ‘just a platform’ and are trying hard to stay away from any content and service plays. My two cents is that Facebook will have to change this approach. It’s not sustainable and also it is not the right thing to do,” Frank said. “Maybe, hopefully, in time, they’ll acknowledge their responsibility for the well being of people who spend so many hours using their services.”

Talkspace, which has raised at least $60 million from investors like SoftBank to power online chat-based therapy, offered a free Facebook group to help hurricane survivors, moderated by around 20 Talkspace representatives. There were groups for both Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma, and Facebook offered a “very nice number” of free ads to promote the groups.

These are moderated support groups — not a medical service or traditional therapy. At their peak they had over 1,000 people, Frank said.

“The support groups hosted conversations on a wide variety of topics, including ‘What do I do if my eating disorder has been triggered by the stress of the storm?,’ as well as ‘How do I process my survivor’s guilt?’ and ‘The best ways to handle anxiety when applying for FEMA benefits’,” Frank said.

But Facebook groups like these could reveal who has shown interest in working with a mental health professional — which could be considered a very private aspect of health and safety after trauma.

“We know that 20 percent to 25 percent of any population will suffer from mental illness every year. This means that in any given time, over 400 million using Facebook are suffering from a clinically diagnosable mental health issue,” Frank wrote in an email to CNBC. “I think Facebook, with their unlimited data capabilities, knows this very well, and it’s highly likely they also know exactly who the suffering users are.”

Facebook confirmed it provided credits for Talkspace’s ad campaign but could not disclose a dollar amount for the donation.

After the recent shooting in Las Vegas, Talkspace opted not to use Facebook groups to help employees of Live Nation, Mandalay Bay, the first responders, and the concert goers. The company is instead offering 100 months of free Talkspace therapy, which had to be done on a platform compliant with HIPAA privacy laws, so Facebook would not have suited.

But Talkspace went back to Facebook groups when it came time to reach victims of recent wildfires in northern California.

“We’ve decided that extending help is the highest priority,” Frank said. “Facebook has its own set of considerations which I’m not a part of, but knowing many people who work there, I believe they’re driven by doing the right thing and help their users — their willingness to help us is one sign of this.”

A hard balance

It’s fairly rare for advertising to be donated to a for-profit company, although it makes sense in the case of disaster, said Anthony LaFauce, vice president of Digital at Porter Novelli, and an adjunct professor who teaches social media strategy at American University. BetterHelp, a competing start-up, said it is also providing free services for those impacted by both Harvey and Irma, but a spokesperson said “it doesn’t look like we’re supporting the Facebook initiative.”

There’s no clear guidance for companies like Facebook and Talkspace when it comes to using health-related data to target advertising.. What happens with self-disclosed health-related data on social media is highly regulated in some ways, but is a grey area in others, LaFauce said.

“[The best practice on ad targeting] walks the balance of counseling and mental health treatment,” LaFauce said. “Fifteen years ago, you put yourself in the newspaper, it becomes public. We’ve been trying to put that into place, but it’s hard to understand, with social media, you’re entering a public conversation.”

Facebook has made changes to its approach to mental health this year, including more sophisticated outreach to users discussing self-harm and suicide and an investment in its safety and security team. The company also matched more than $1 million in donations for Hurricane Harvey, and donated $1 million to local organizations to help with wildfires in California.

Frank said Talkspace donates at least 500 months of free therapy to audiences and populations that can’t afford it each year. But he said would not deliver therapy on a platform like Facebook that “isn’t ours and is not HIPAA compliant.”

“Maybe, hopefully, in time, they’ll acknowledge their responsibility for the well being of people who [spend] so many hours using their services. I hope so,” Frank said.

ae00e_104835913-Oren_frank.530x298 Facebook offered free ads to mental health start-up, but could do more to address mental health, says Talkspace CEO



Experts address better health for Pacific Islanders

Shortfalls in Pacific Islander health are an old problem that can only be solved with new ways of thinking, experts said at a recent conference.

Researchers from across the globe met in Honolulu last month for the second Gathering for Pacific Islander Health to discuss issues such as diabetes and mental illness, which afflict islanders more than almost any other demographic group. The United States is home to hundreds of thousands of islanders, with more than 12,000 living in Northwest Arkansas, according to the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, which co-hosted the conference.

“In some ways, we’re here to learn but also to be inspired,” said Dr. Andy Subica, a clinical psychologist and researcher at the University of California Riverside School of Medicine who has worked with UAMS in recent years.

The litany of health problems has become all too familiar, said Dr. Raynald Samoa, a California endocrinologist who studies diabetes and obesity. Poverty, diets heavy in processed foods and, in the case of the Marshall Islands, dozens of American nuclear-weapon tests have all contributed to high rates of cancer, obesity and rare diseases such as leprosy throughout the Pacific.

The Arkansas university’s surveys find roughly half of the Marshallese in Northwest Arkansas have diabetes, compared to about 9 percent of U.S. adults. Most are overweight.

“You get a little jaded, you know,” Samoa told the group. He compared islanders to people struggling to swim in a river. Doctors jump in to pull them out, he said, but researchers must figuratively go upriver to find the underlying reasons the people are in their situations in the first place instead of trying to fight each symptom on its own.

“These conditions that run together — diabetes, heart disease and cancer — they run together so often that it cannot be random,” Samoa said. Instead, the conditions could be linked. Diabetes, the body’s inability to respond to changing blood- sugar levels, can feed into obesity when that sugar converts to fat, for instance. Stress, lack of sleep or exercise amplify those problems and can sap the brain’s power to learn and change unhealthy behaviors.

“I likened it to there’s a lot of firewood, but there’s no matches,” Samoa said of the brain’s lack of resources in such a scenario. “If you plant that in your life, then this is the tree you’re ultimately going to sprout.”

Other conference speakers described the progress they’ve made uprooting the tree.

In Northwest Arkansas, the medical university’s Center for Pacific Islander Health works with Marshallese community leaders to find the group’s health goals and the most effective ways to reach them together, such as with family and church-based exercise and diet programs.

Dr. Sheldon Riklon, a Marshallese family doctor who joined the university around the time of last year’s conference in Fayetteville, treats his fellow islanders at two clinics and pushes the community’s youth to go into health-related careers.

“I love working there,” Riklon told the conference. “I can see the potential of what we can do there with the students, with the community.”

Last year’s conference featured several calls for Arkansas to allow Marshallese access to public health care programs such as Medicaid. The state has since added Marshallese children to the ARKids First program, which pays most or all of the health care costs for tens of thousands of low-income children in the state.

Lucy Capelle, director of the Arkansas Coalition of Marshallese, said last month that she planned to sign up two of her children when the program opens to them in January.

“Everyone is very happy about it,” she said. “At last, now they can enroll into ARKids, and they don’t have to worry about medical bills that they have.”

The University of Arkansas has also partnered with United Way and other groups to encourage college savings accounts among Marshallese families and provide financial classes. The first one is set for Thursday, Marcia Shobe, a social work professor at the university involved in the project, wrote in an email.

Back in the Marshall Islands, outreach efforts in churches and at bingo nights have helped providers screen hundreds of women for cancer, said Neiar Kabua, coordinator with the islands’ Comprehensive Cancer Control Program. She said she hopes to expand the effort to work sites and some of the more isolated islands.

Caolae Jones, a nurse, told the conference that Dubuque, Iowa, has made some progress in diabetes screenings and control among its small Marshallese population by hiring a Marshallese health care worker.

These successes often run into the messiness of life, however. Kabua said the cancer outreach often was stuck with under-equipped clinics, and other researchers noted health programs often make a lot of progress at first before plateauing or sliding backward.

Subica, the California psychologist, pointed to a recent Los Angeles County program that tried to encourage the local Samoan population to seek mental health services if needed. Samoans were involved in the effort, yet in two years the program managed to recruit fewer than five Samoans out of a population of 50,000, perhaps because of stigma around mental illness and the distractions of stress and poverty.

So Subica hopes to help with a project he’s begun with Nia Aitaoto, co-director of the Pacific Islander health center in Fayetteville. The pair will run surveys and community focus groups in California and Arkansas to get firm mental health data for islanders specifically, which is often lacking in other studies, and find ways to put that data to good use.

“Pacific Islander communities have way more strengths than many communities I work with, but they’re just not integrated into any type of care,” Subica said.

Every islander health project like this should pursue wellness, not just the absence of disease, said Dr. Stevenson Kuartei from the nation of Palau north of Australia.

“Wellness is a public good because it allows for individuals to pursue and fulfill their potential,” he said.

Metro on 11/13/2017

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Launch of special initiative to address climate change impact on health in Small Island Developing States

Joint news release UNFCCC/WHO


Today, at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP23), WHO, in collaboration with the UN Climate Change secretariat and in partnership with the Fijian Presidency of the twenty-third Conference of the Parties (COP23), has launched a special initiative to protect people living in Small Island Developing States from the heath impacts of climate change.

The vision is that, by 2030, all Small Island Developing States will have health systems that are resilient to climate change and countries around the world will be reducing their carbon emissions both to protect the most vulnerable from climate risks and deliver large health benefits in carbon-emitting countries.

The initiative has 4 main goals.

First, to amplify the voices of health leaders in Small Island Developing States, so they have more impact at home and internationally.

Second, to gather the evidence to support the business case for investment in climate change and health.

Third, to promote policies that improve preparedness and prevention, including “climate proof” health systems.

Fourth, to triple the levels of international financial support to climate and health in small island developing states.

“People living in Small Island Developing States are on the frontline of extreme weather events, rising sea levels and increased risk of infectious disease,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of WHO. “We owe it to these people to do everything we can to help them prepare for the future that is already washing up on their shores.”

“We in Fiji know all too well that climate change poses a serious threat to the health of our people. I’m delighted that we are launching this initiative – in partnership with the WHO and UNFCCC – to better equip small island states like ours with the knowledge, resources and technology to increase the resilience of their health systems, as part of larger efforts to adapt to climate change,” said Fijian Prime Minister and COP23 President Frank Bainimarama.

Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change, said: “Climate change will increasingly impact the health and well-being of people everywhere unless nations fully implement the Paris Agreement”.

“Small islands are in the frontline from extreme weather events that can contaminate drinking water to health-hazardous heatwaves and the spread of infectious diseases. This initiative can strengthen the response of small islands to the rising risks as the world works to ensure that together we keep a global temperature rise well below 2 degrees C and better, no higher than 1.5 degrees,” she said.

Small Island Developing States have long been recognized as especially vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change. Their situation is highlighted in the UNFCCC, by Ministers of Health at the 2008 World Health Assembly, and in the 2015 Paris Agreement.

They have also pioneered innovative approaches to improve the resilience of their health systems to climate change. As well as emitting a small proportion of the greenhouse gases that are driving climate change, many are further reducing their already low carbon emissions.

“Small Island Developing States are ready to take leadership towards green, resilient and health-promoting national development – but the support of the international community is essential,” said Dr Joy St John, recently appointed Assistant Director-General for Climate and Other Determinants of Health at WHO.

“Less than 1.5% of international finance for climate change adaptation is allocated to projects which ensure that the health of all people is preserved, and only a fraction of this supports small island developing states. The recent severe weather events in the Caribbean demonstrate that targeted interventions are important. We need to do much more and we need to act very quickly.”

Country ownership is a central principle of this initiative. Ministers of health from some of the most affected countries have already started to provide input through consultation with WHO’s Director-General and at WHO Regional Committee meetings, and this process will continue.

Since 2015, WHO has been working with the UNFCCC secretariat to develop detailed country profiles to assess risks, and provide tailored advice on how these countries can adapt to, and mitigate, the health effects of climate change. More than 45 country profiles have already been completed and, as part of this initiative, WHO commits to publishing a country profile for all small island developing states by the end of 2018.

Many national health actors, development and United Nations agencies are already making important contributions to protect health in small island developing states. WHO’s initiative aims to bring together existing and new efforts and scale them up so they achieve maximum impact.

“The vision is that, by 2030, all health systems in small island developing states will be able to withstand climate variability and change,” adds Dr St John. “And, of course, that countries around the world will have substantially reduced carbon emissions.”

For more information, please contact:

Nada Osseiran
Communications Officer
Mobile: +41 79 445 1624
Email: osseirann@who.int

Sarah Cumberland
Communications Officer
Mobile: +4179 2061403
Email: cumberlands@who.int

James Creswick
WHO EURO Office in Bonn
Mobile +491722083967
Email: creswickj@who.int

Dr. Samadi: Month of ‘Movember’ is time to address men’s health

Be on the lookout for more men sporting facial hair. It’s Movember — also known as No-Shave November or Moustache November, and the next 30 days is meant to bring awareness to men’s health.

Every day of the year should be a day devoted to the health of men, but this month shines a spotlight on often-overlooked issues affecting men, such as prostate and testicular cancers as well as depression and suicide.

This annual event began in 2004 in Australia when a group of friends wanted to raise awareness of the need for early cancer detection, diagnosis and effective treatments for men. Their goal was to ultimately reduce the number of preventable deaths men face.

To help raise that awareness, instead of wearing a colored ribbon, men are encouraged to grow a moustache as their “ribbon” reminding each of us of the importance of men’s health.

The top 8 behaviors of sexually healthy men

The phrase, “grow a mo, save a bro,” is meant to inspire donations, conversations, and real change.

One of Movember’s aims is to bring to light the fact that men, on average, die six years younger than women, and for reasons that are largely preventable.

Here are five things men should do in Movember to do protecting their physical and mental health:

1. Make man time

Dr. Samadi: 7 ways to keep your prostate healthy and cancer-free

Stay connected with other men friends to catch up and check in on one another.

2. Have open conversations

Be there for each other, listening and giving of your time.

3. Know the numbers

Dr. Samadi: What to do if your sex drive is stuck in low gear

At the age of 40, men should talk to their doctor about prostate cancer and having a prostate specific antigen (PSA) test.

4. Go nuts

Men should know what is normal for their testicles by checking them regularly and if something is not right, to go see their doctor.

5. Move more

Dr. Samadi: 7 reasons why men experience pain during intercourse

Men should add more activity every day. Take walking meetings, take the stairs, or bicycle to work.

Dr. David Samadi

This month of Movember is focused on three specific health issues to men — prostate cancer, testicular cancer, and mental health and suicide prevention:

Prostate cancer

Since only men have a prostate gland, they need to know the facts on prostate cancer and to take action early to prevent it from spreading.

The 8 most common urological issues affecting men

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men in the U.S. This walnut-sized and shaped gland tends to grow bigger as a man ages. If detected early, men have a 98% chance of survival beyond five years. If detected late, men have only a 26% chance of survival beyond five years.

What do men need to do to care for their prostate? They need to go to their doctor and starting at the age of 40, have a routine prostate specific antigen (PSA) test done. By starting early, this improves the chances of finding prostate cancer at an earlier, more treatable stage.

Testicular cancer

Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in young men aged 15-34 in the U.S. In most cases, the outcome for men with testicular cancer is very good — a 95% chance of survival.

But for the 1 in 20 men who won’t make it, that is no comfort. The best thing a man can do is to feel their testicles for any abnormalities on a regular basis. This helps a man to know what feels right and to recognize if there is anything that is abnormal.

Men who are at risk of testicular cancer include those with undescended testes at birth, or who have a family history, like a father or brother, who has had testicular cancer. The good news is this cancer is highly treatable and be effectively treated and often cured, if diagnosed and treated early.

Mental health and suicide prevention

The statistics tell a story: three out of four suicides are men. What can each of us do? We can talk, listen, encourage action, and check in on the men we love and know.

There are many resources for men who are feeling down and can’t seem to shake the funk or feelings of being overwhelmed about life.

Help men to move beyond these feelings. Help them recognize symptoms of depression. Then, have them talk to someone they trust. Encourage them to get moving through physical exercise. Make sure they take breaks giving themselves downtime to get out and have some fun. If they still are struggling mentally, have them talk to a professional for advice and support.

For men needing to speak with someone immediately, contact National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255; if suicide is imminent, call 911 or go directly to emergency services.

Dr. Samadi is a board-certified urologic oncologist trained in open and traditional and laparoscopic surgery and is an expert in robotic prostate surgery. He is chairman of urology, chief of robotic surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital. He is a medical contributor for the Fox News Channel’s Medical A-Team. Follow Dr. Samadi on Twitter, Instagram, Pintrest, SamadiMD.com, davidsamadiwiki, davidsamadibio and Facebook

For more DAILY VIEWS, The News’ contributor network, click here.

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Critical Tor flaw leaks users’ real IP address—update now

f7e5c_tor-update-800x428 Critical Tor flaw leaks users' real IP address—update now

Mac and Linux versions of the Tor anonymity browser just received a temporary fix for a critical vulnerability that leaks users’ IP addresses when they visit certain types of addresses.

TorMoil, as the flaw has been dubbed by its discoverer, is triggered when users click on links that begin with file:// rather than the more common https:// and http:// address prefixes. When the Tor browser for macOS and Linux is in the process of opening such an address, “the operating system may directly connect to the remote host, bypassing Tor Browser,” according to a brief blog post published Tuesday by We Are Segment, the security firm that privately reported the bug to Tor developers.

On Friday, members of the Tor Project issued a temporary work-around that plugs that IP leak. Until the final fix is in place, updated versions of the browser may not behave properly when navigating to file:// addresses. They said both the Windows versions of Tor, Tails, and the sandboxed Tor browser that’s in alpha testing aren’t vulnerable.

“The fix we deployed is just a workaround stopping the leak,” Tor officials wrote in a post announcing Friday’s release. “As a result of that navigating file:// URLs in the browser might not work as expected anymore. In particular entering file:// URLs in the URL bar and clicking on resulting links is broken. Opening those in a new tab or new window does not work either. A workaround for those issues is dragging the link into the URL bar or on a tab instead. We track this follow-up regression in bug 24136.”

Friday’s post went on to say that We Are Segment CEO Filippo Cavallarin privately reported the vulnerability on October 26. Tor developers worked with Mozilla developers to create a work-around the following day, but it only partially worked. They finished work on a more complete work-around on Tuesday. The post didn’t explain why the fix, delivered in Tor browser version 7.0.9 for Mac and Linux users, wasn’t issued until Friday, three days later. The Tor browser is based on Mozilla’s open-source Firefox browser. The IP leak stems from a Firefox bug.

Tor officials also warned that alpha versions of the Tor browser for Mac and Linux haven’t yet received the fix. They said they have tentatively scheduled a patch to go live on Monday for those versions. In the meantime, the officials said, Mac and Linux alpha users should use updated versions of the stable version.

Tor’s statement Friday said there’s no evidence the flaw has been actively exploited on the Internet or darkweb to obtain the IP addresses or Tor users. Of course, the lack of evidence doesn’t mean the flaw wasn’t exploited by law enforcement officers, private investigators, or stalkers. And now that a fix is available, it will be easy for adversaries who didn’t know about the vulnerability before to create working exploits. Anyone who relies on a Mac or Linux version of the Tor browser to shield their IP address should update as soon as possible and be ready for the possibility, however remote, their IP addresses have already been leaked.

Health officials ramping up efforts to address hepatitis A outbreak

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You’ve likely heard of hepatitis C, a disease intravenous drug users have contracted from using needles unsafely. But hepatitis is much more complex.
Time

Ingham County health officials are urging hospital, food service and sanitation workers to get vaccinated amidst what state officials are calling a regional hepatitis A outbreak.

Because the national supply of hepatitis A vaccines is limited, officials are only encouraging high-risk individuals to be vaccinated at this time.

That also includes men who have sex with men, people who are homeless, people with liver problems, illicit drug users and sex workers and their clients. 

Hepatitis A is highly contagious, but vaccinations and thorough hand-washing can prevent its spread. The disease attacks the liver and causes symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dark urine, clay-colored stool, fever, chills, and yellow skin and eyes (jaundice) and can be fatal.

Three Ingham County residents have been diagnosed with the disease since August. One of those people has died.

“In two months, we’ve seen the number of cases we typically expect to see over the course of a year,” Ingham County Health Officer Linda Vail said.

Last month, Ingham County health officials vaccinated staff and clientele at two local homeless shelters following a possible exposure to hepatitis A. The health department declined to release the names of the shelters.

Sparrow Health System, McLaren Greater Lansing and Michigan State University are all taking steps to deal with the outbreak.

Outbreaks reported across several states

Several states, including Colorado and California, are also battling hepatitis A outbreaks and there is an increased demand for the vaccine. There are only two manufacturers with FDA-approval to make the vaccine, which is administered as two shots six months apart.

For over a year, Southeast Michigan has been fighting a more widespread hepatitis A outbreak. In recent months, hepatitis A cases have been linked to food workers in Ann Arbor, Grosse Pointe Woods and Grosse Pointe Park and Mt. Pleasant.  

Michigan activated its State Emergency Operations Center this week to help coordinate local responses to hepatitis A.

More:

Ann Arbor restaurant worker diagnosed with hepatitis A

Judy Putnam: Vaccine education is small price to pay

Hepatitis A cases spike among men who have sex with men, Michigan health officials warn

Vaccine supply ‘constrained’

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that although the Hepatitis A vaccine supply is “constrained” it does not yet constitute a shortage.

Even though the state is recommending the vaccine for high-risk individuals, low-risk individuals will not be denied the vaccine if they were to request it, said Michigan Department of Health and Human Services spokeswoman Angela Minicuci.

An Ingham County Health Department spokeswoman said the department does not have an approximate figure on the number individuals in the county at high risk for hepatitis A.

The health department is offering immunizations though officials encourage people with private health insurance to instead contact their health care providers.

Since August 2016, there have been 457 confirmed cases of hepatitis A in the state, according to the most recent data. That figure represents a 14-fold increase in cases compared to the same period in 2014-15. 

Eighteen Michigan residents have died from hepatitis A.

No single source has been identified. 

“We are seeing a large person-to-person transmission. It’s that not that we have one particular food source, or one specific drug” linking all the cases, said Angela Minicuci, a spokeswoman for the Michigan Department of Health Human Services.

The illness ranges in severity and may last for several weeks or a few months. A blood test can determine whether someone has hepatitis A.

The disease can spread between sexual partners. It can also spread if a person ingests the virus due to contact with food, water or household objects that are contaminated by the feces of an infected person.

Michigan State University is “strongly encouraging” hepatitis A vaccination for its more than 5,000 food service workers, university spokesman Jason Cody said.

“In light of this, we do kind of ramp up our training in terms of hygiene and preventing food-borne illnesses,” Cody said. “We’re taking extra care to remind the staff of this information.”

The university cannot require its employees to be vaccinated, but Cody noted that doctors and nurses who work at the MSU Clinical Center must comply with licensing requirements, which could include vaccinations.

There have been no hepatitis A cases at MSU, Cody said.

Dr. Linda Mercado Peterson, chief medical officer at McLaren Greater Lansing, said the hospital has not dealt with any recent cases of hepatitis A.

As a preventative measure, the hospital is urging, but not mandating, its highest-risk employees to be vaccinated. That includes food service workers and more than 100 emergency room staff members.

McLaren has a stock of vaccines, which will be sufficient to meet the needs of high-risk people, Peterson said.

Sparrow Hospital also has not had a problem obtaining vaccines for the people who need them, said Jeffrey Kay, safety officer and director of accreditation at Sparrow.

The hospital is offering hepatitis A vaccines to about 1,800 at-risk employees, including emergency room staff members, food service workers and security personnel. The vaccines are not mandated for those employees

Kay said he could not comment on whether Sparrow has treated any hepatitis A cases.

The hospital has a task force to respond to the outbreak, Kay said, and is communicating with the health department.

“The key to hepatitis A is containment,” Kay said.

Detroit Free Press reporter Ann Zaniewski . and Free Press staff contributed to this report. Contact Sarah Lehr at (517) 377-1056 or slehr@lsj.com. Follow her on Twitter @SarahGLehr. Ann Zaniewski of the Detroit Free Press contributed reporting.

About hepatitis A

If you think you might have hepatitis A, contact your doctor. To be vaccinated, contact your health care provider or the Ingham County Immunization Clinic at (517) 887-4316.

NIH establishes new research in social epigenomics to address health disparities

News Release

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Grant program to break new ground in genomics and health disparities research.

The National Institutes of Health will award 10 grants to support social epigenomics research in health disparities. This investigator-initiated research is being funded as part of the Social Epigenomics Research Focused on Minority Health and Health Disparities research program, which seeks to support research to better understand the drivers of health disparities. The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), part of the National Institutes of Health, will commit $26.2 million over five years, subject to available funds, for nine awards. An additional award under this initiative will be funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) – also part of NIH.

Social epigenomics is the study of how social experiences affect the genes and our biology. Our experiences do not alter the genetic code itself; however, social experiences may bring about changes in the various molecules that interact with DNA, determining which genes are switched on or off. Recent studies suggest that social stressors may affect health status through epigenomic modifications of various biological pathways.

Living in disadvantaged neighborhoods with exposure to chemical stressors, violence, discrimination, residential segregation and psychosocial stress, and limited access to healthy foods, can affect a person’s ability to stay healthy – becoming barriers to health.

“We are on the cusp of unprecedented research where we are bringing together different fields of science: social science and epigenetics, to help elucidate how social factors affect biology in health disparity populations,” said NIMHD Director Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, M.D.

Research geared toward understanding how epigenomic changes are influenced by social experiences may lead to a better understanding of mechanisms and pathways that may ultimately affect minority health and health disparities.

By identifying epigenetic modifications prior to the onset of disease, it may be possible to tailor interventions to prevent chronic conditions or diseases later in life which may result in better approaches to disease prevention, and early diagnosis, with the end goal of reducing health disparities.

The award recipients are:

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Epigenetic Mediation of Adverse Social Context on Stress Response, Socioemotional Development, and Health in a Population-based Study of Minority and Low SES Children and Adolescents
Colter Mitchell, Ph.D.
1R01MD011716-01 — Researchers will examine whether DNA methylation mediates the effects of adverse social experiences, such as poverty, harsh parenting, family instability and neighborhood disorganization, on biological processes related to stress response and stress-responsive behaviors in children and adolescents.

University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign
Epigenomic Predictors of PTSD and Traumatic Stress in an African American Cohort
Monica Uddin, Ph.D.
1R01MD011728-01  — Researchers will characterize genome wide patterns of leukocyte DNA methylation in African American participants in the Detroit Neighborhood Health Study, a population-based study of mental disorders among adult Detroit residents. Analyzing glucocorticoid receptor regulatory network genes, they will test the effects of social adversity on DNA methylation levels.

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Race/Ethnicity, DNA Methylation, and Disparities in Cardiovascular Mortality: NHANES 1999-2002
Belinda L. Needham
1R01MD011721-01 — Researchers will study whether differences in DNA methylation between African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, and non-Hispanic Whites helps explain why mortality rates for cardiovascular disease are higher among African Americans and how socially-patterned risk factors become physically embodied.

University of Florida, Gainesville
Epigenetic Mechanisms of Emotional/Behavioral Health Among Impoverished African American Youth 
Darlene A. Kertes, Ph.D.
1R01MD011727-01 — Researchers will investigate whether environmental stressors, such as racial discrimination and exposure to violence, are associated with DNA methylation and telomere length among low-income, urban minority youth, which can help inform biological mediators of stress effects on emotional/behavioral health.

University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Influence of Prenatal Psychosocial Stressors on Maternal and Fetal Circulating miRNAs
Carrie Breton, Sc.D.
1R01MD011698-01  — Researchers will evaluate whether psychosocial stressors in the maternal environment impact the pattern of expression of maternal and fetal microRNA (miRNA) from low SES Hispanic women and whether the expression of these miRNA can impact critical newborn and early life health outcomes indicative of future health trajectory.

North Carolina State University, Raleigh
Social Adversities, Epigenetics, and the Obesity Epidemic
Cathrine Hoyo, Ph.D.
1R01MD011746-01 —  Researchers will explore mechanisms by which social adversity confers risk for obesity in youth among Blacks, Hispanics and Whites and unravel the pathways by which mothers’ prenatal stress may alter DNA methylation and influence early development, growth trajectories and childhood obesity.

University of Pittsburgh
Exposure to Violence, Epigenetic Variation, and Asthma in Puerto Rican Children
Juan Carlos Celedon M.D., Dr.PH
1R01MD011764-01  — Researchers will determine how exposure to violence leads to increased risk of asthma and asthma morbidity through altered methylation of genes regulating behavioral, autonomic, neuroendocrine and immunologic responses to stress in Puerto Rican children.

Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, California (NCI-funded)
Epigenetic Damage in Women Living in LA Food Desert Zip Codes Victoria Seewaldt, M.D.
1R01CA220693-01 —Researchers will explore in young Women-of-Color (African-American and Latina/Hispanic-American) living in food-desert zip codes in Los Angeles, whether insulin-resistance promotes epigenetic damage and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) risk.

North Carolina Central University, Kannapolis
Molecular Determinants of Social Factors in Prostate Cance
1R01MD012767-01 — Deepak Kumar, Ph.D.
Researchers will analyze circulating microRNAs and stress hormone levels in African American prostate cancer patients living in the Washington D.C., metropolitan area, at different levels of socioeconomic status (SES) and social stress to understand the epigenetic mechanisms modified by social stress that may cause prostate cancer health disparities.

Northwestern University
Understanding Socioeconomic Disparities in Perinatal Risk: The Role of Epigenetic and Transcriptional Regulation in the Placent
1R01MD011749-01 — Gregory Evan Miller, Ph.D.
Researchers will determine the extent to which socioeconomic/psychosocial conditions affect prenatal DNA methylation, miRNA expression, mRNA expression and inflammation, and influence preterm birth and small for gestational age among low SES women.

NIMHD is one of NIH’s 27 Institutes and Centers. It leads scientific research to improve minority health and eliminate health disparities by conducting and supporting research; planning, reviewing, coordinating, and evaluating all minority health and health disparities research at NIH; promoting and supporting the training of a diverse research workforce; translating and disseminating research information; and fostering collaborations and partnerships. For more information about NIMHD, visit https://www.nimhd.nih.gov.

About the National Cancer Institute (NCI): NCI leads the National Cancer Program and the NIH’s efforts to dramatically reduce the prevalence of cancer and improve the lives of cancer patients and their families, through research into prevention and cancer biology, the development of new interventions, and the training and mentoring of new researchers. For more information about cancer, please visit the NCI website at cancer.gov or call NCI’s Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH):
NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

NIH…Turning Discovery Into Health®

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Wearable tech devices can address health problems – Tribune

Updated 9 hours ago

Projects featuring wearable health care devices received a total of $565,000 in awards at the final event in the Pitt Innovation Challenge.

The challenge, in its fourth year, was sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute. Contestants addressed the question, “How can we use wearable technology to address an important health problem?”

“Wearable technology capabilities are advancing rapidly, and this year’s PInCh final showcased how this technology can make a difference in health care,” said institute director Dr. Steven Reis in a news release.

Thirteen teams competed at the final pitch event on Oct. 25, which included live presentations and posters. Three projects took home $100,000 to $125,000 each in funding, seven received $10,000 to $30,000, and three others received $10,000.

Funds to support 2017 PInCh awards were provided by DSF Charitable Foundation, the charitable-giving organization of the David Scaife family.

Projects receiving $100,000 to $125,000 were:

MOVISU-Fit: Mobile gait training system for lower limb amputees that provides real-time visual feedback.

Purrr: An intuitive tool that detects rising stress levels and empowers people to control it.

ThermalBlock: A reversible thermal block technology to suppress or completely disrupt peripheral nerve activity without causing tissue damage or pain

The $25,000 to $30,000 projects are:

FitIt: A smart, adjustable and self-monitoring compression stocking for patients with chronic venous insufficiency, a condition that affects blood flow from veins in the leg back to the heart.

InterACTION: ADL Module: Behavioral intervention for chronic low back pain that assesses activities of daily living and provides a customized treatment plan.

OH Alert!: Technology that assesses individualized heart rate data to predict and warn a person of potential falls due to a low blood pressure condition.

uHaptic: For upper or lower limb prostheses to interface with existing and future stimulation systems to provide life-like sensory feedback to the wearer.

REMIT DM: A technology that combines continuous glucose monitors with temporary intensive insulin therapy to restore a diabetic’s ability to make his or her own insulin.

FLO2 NeuroCap: A non-invasive technology to monitor brain oxygenation and neuronal activity in children after cardiac arrest or other brain injury.

Manual Wheelchair Virtual Seating Coach: A system to help manual wheelchair users learn and remember to do adequate pressure reliefs to prevent the development of pressure ulcers.

The $10,000 awards went to:

FingerSight: Technology patented by Pitt that replaces eye motion with finger motion, allowing visually impaired users to scan the environment and rapidly find and identify objects.

I-HITS: An individualized hand improvement and tracking system, which allows stroke patients to monitor hand movement and therapists to deliver treatment remotely.

MagicSocks: Smart textile device for treatment of restless leg syndrome that delivers controlled electrical and vibrational stimulations to lower extremities.

This year’s challenge included a Veteran Impact Incentive, with solutions aiding U.S. military veterans being eligible for up to an additional $25,000 in funding, which the MOVISU-Fit and Purrr projects receive.

Project videos can be viewed at pinch.pitt.edu .

Shirley McMarlin is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5750, smcmarlin@tribweb.com or via Twitter @shirley_trib.




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